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The Candidacy and Presidency of Donald Trump
07-26-2015, 03:53 AM
Post: #76
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(07-24-2015 11:06 AM)BRIC Countries Wrote:  


I made it through 25 seconds. All he does is desensitize people to critical issues. My cod those cackling idiots in the audience...

I guess it didn't matter whether we elected Clinton or Trump.
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07-26-2015, 07:16 AM
Post: #77
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(07-26-2015 03:53 AM)GMB13 Wrote:  
(07-24-2015 11:06 AM)BRIC Countries Wrote:  


I made it through 25 seconds. All he does is desensitize people to critical issues. My cod those cackling idiots in the audience...

Yep.
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07-26-2015, 07:33 AM
Post: #78
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump


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07-30-2015, 12:40 AM
Post: #79
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
Could Trump Win?

By Pat Buchanon

The American political class has failed the country, and should be fired. That is the clearest message from the summer surge of Bernie Sanders and the remarkable rise of Donald Trump.

Sanders’ candidacy can trace it roots back to the 19th-century populist party of Mary Elizabeth Lease who declaimed:

“Wall Street owns the country. It is no longer a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, but a government of Wall Street, by Wall Street, and for Wall Street. The great common people of this country are slaves, and monopoly is the master.”

“Raise less corn and more hell!” Mary admonished the farmers of Kansas.

William Jennings Bryan captured the Democratic nomination in 1896 by denouncing the gold standard beloved of the hard money men of his day: “You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold.”

Sanders is in that tradition, if not in that league as an orator. His followers, largely white, $50,000-a-year folks with college degrees, call to mind more the followers of George McGovern than Jennings Bryan.

Yet the stagnation of workers’ wages as the billionaire boys club admits new members, and the hemorrhaging of U.S. jobs under trade deals done for the Davos-Doha crowd, has created a blazing issue of economic inequality that propels the Sanders campaign.

Between his issues and Trump’s there is overlap. Both denounce the trade deals that deindustrialized America and shipped millions of jobs off to Mexico, Asia and China. But Trump has connected to an even more powerful current.

That is the issue of uncontrolled and illegal immigration, the sense America’s borders are undefended, that untold millions of lawbreakers are in our country, and more are coming. While most come to work, they are taking American jobs and consuming tax dollars, and too many come to rob, rape, murder and make a living selling drugs.

Moreover, the politicians who have talked about this for decades are a pack of phonies who have done little to secure the border.

Trump boasts that he will get the job done, as he gets done all other jobs he has undertaken. And his poll ratings are one measure of how far out of touch the Republican establishment is with the Republican heartland.

When Trump ridicules his rivals as Lilliputians and mocks the celebrity media, the Republican base cheers and laughs with him.

He is boastful, brash, defiant, unapologetic, loves campaigning, and is putting on a great show with his Trump planes and 100-foot-long stretch limos. “Every man a king but no man wears a crown,” said Huey Long. “I’m gonna make America great again,” says Donald.

Compared to Trump, all the other candidates, including Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush, are boring. He makes politics entertaining, fun.

Trump also benefits from the perception that his rivals and the press want him out of the race and are desperately seizing upon any gaffe to drive him out. The piling on, the abandonment of Trump by the corporate elite, may have cost him a lot of money. But it also brought him support he would not otherwise have had.

For no group of Americans has been called more names than the base of the GOP. The attacks that caused the establishment to wash its hands of Trump as an embarrassment brought the base to his defense.

But can Trump win?

If his poll numbers hold, Trump will be there six months from now when the Sweet 16 is cut to the Final Four, and he will likely be in the finals. For if Trump is running at 18 or 20 percent nationally then, among Republicans, it is hard to see how two rivals beat him.

For Trump not to be in the hunt as the New Hampshire primary opens, his campaign will have to implode, as Gary Hart’s did in 1987, and Bill Clinton’s almost did in 1992.

Thus, in the next six months, Trump will have to commit some truly egregious blunder that costs him his present following. Or the dirt divers of the media and “oppo research” arms of the other campaigns will have to come up with some high-yield IEDs.

Presidential primaries are minefields for the incautious, and Trump is not a cautious man. And it is difficult to see how, in a two-man race against the favorite of the Republican establishment, he could win enough primaries, caucuses and delegates to capture 50 percent of the convention votes.

For almost all of the candidates who will have dropped out by then will have endorsed the last man standing against Trump. And should Trump be nominated, his candidacy would make Barry Goldwater look like the great uniter of the GOP.

Still, who expected Donald Trump to be in the catbird seat in the GOP nomination run before the first presidential debate? And even his TV antagonists cannot deny he has been great for ratings.
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07-31-2015, 04:14 AM
Post: #80
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
Is the Donster still making big waves? Let's check back in a few months, when the real candidates start getting into gear.

The Donster is a distraction to get Americans in the voting frame of mind. He will definitely not be there at the end.

Anyone wanna bet?

come for the calo, stay for the yoshida brotha
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07-31-2015, 08:43 AM
Post: #81
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(07-31-2015 04:14 AM)Winnson Wrote:  Is the Donster still making big waves? Let's check back in a few months, when the real candidates start getting into gear.

The Donster is a distraction to get Americans in the voting frame of mind. He will definitely not be there at the end.

Anyone wanna bet?

I tend to agree. I don't see him wanting the presidency for real.

I just wonder how long he will participate until he exits. Maybe just long enough to help his chosen candidate?
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07-31-2015, 09:21 AM
Post: #82
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(07-31-2015 04:14 AM)Winnson Wrote:  Is the Donster still making big waves? Let's check back in a few months, when the real candidates start getting into gear.

The Donster is a distraction to get Americans in the voting frame of mind. He will definitely not be there at the end.

Anyone wanna bet?

This is exactly what I think. It's a little bit of drama that's going to get America pulled into the 2016 cycle early.
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07-31-2015, 09:23 AM
Post: #83
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(07-26-2015 07:33 AM)BRIC Countries Wrote:  


Lol at Bill O'Rielly trying to play the Anti-War Advocate.

"You don't respect Iraq's Territorial Integrity??? Really???"
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08-03-2015, 06:36 AM
Post: #84
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
Is the Trumpster still making a splash?

come for the calo, stay for the yoshida brotha
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08-03-2015, 07:48 AM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2015 07:53 AM by Reflexion.)
Post: #85
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
The Trump train appears to have derailed. The story below:

Donald Trump, the Republican presidential hopeful who shot up to the head of the pack over his controversial comments about illegal immigrants, is finally starting to lay out an immigration policy.

Trump said Wednesday in an interview with CNN's Dana Bash that as president he would deport all undocumented immigrants and then allow the "good ones" to reenter the country through an "expedited process" and live in the U.S. legally, though not as citizens.

"Legal status," Trump suggested. "We got to move 'em out, we're going to move 'em back in if they're really good people."

For a blustering candidate whose rhetoric has snatched headlines and galvanized a sizable segment of the Republican base, Trump's comments Wednesday represent his most detailed explanation into what he would do with the estimated 11-plus million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

He had previously suggested that he favors a "merit-based system," but did not delve into his support of granting legal status, but not citizenship to undocumented immigrants he calls "the good ones."

But Trump is still a long ways from presenting a specific immigration policy platform and his explanation in Wednesday's interview shows a candidate who -- despite leading in the polls a week ahead of the first primary debate -- is still largely dealing in broad strokes.

Trump would not say how he would locate, round up and deport the 11 million undocumented immigrants he says must go. Instead, he deflected, saying that while it may be a task too tall for politicians, it isn't for a business mogul like himself.

"Politicians aren't going to find them because they have no clue. We will find them, we will get them out," Trump said. "It's feasible if you know how to manage. Politicians don't know how to manage."

And when asked about whether he would deport undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, Trump fumbled and said, unsure, that "it's a tough situation" and "it depends."

Trump was unequivocal, though, that a Trump administration would immediately deport undocumented criminals living freely and in American jails.

"We have a lot of bad dudes, as I said. We have a lot of really bad people here," Trump said. "I want to get the bad ones out...And by the way, they're never coming back."

But he was also unwavering in his insistence that many of the undocumented immigrants in the U.S. are positive additions to the country and should be allowed to live in the U.S. legally -- of course, only after being expelled and then brought back in through Trump's "expedited process" for legal status.

"We have to make sure they were exemplary, they were wonderful people when they were here. They worked hard, there was no problem," he said. "We have to bring great people into this country. OK? And I want to bring -- I love the idea of immigration. But it's got to be legal immigration."

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/07/29/politi...flip-flop/
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08-04-2015, 10:16 AM
Post: #86
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
How Big a Third-Party Threat Is Trump?

Monday, August 03, 2015

If “The Donald” loses the Republican presidential nomination and runs as a third-party candidate, he definitely could put a crimp in GOP hopes to reclaim the White House.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 29% of Likely U.S. Voters say they are at least somewhat likely to vote for Trump if he is not chosen as the GOP nominee and runs as a third party candidate. But that includes only 14% who say they are Very Likely to vote for him. Sixty-eight percent (68%) say they are unlikely to vote for the billionaire developer if he runs as a third-party presidential candidate, with 51% who say it’s Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Worrisome for Republicans, however, is the finding that over a third (36%) of Likely GOP Voters say they are likely to vote for Trump if he’s a third-party candidate, with 18% who are Very Likely to do so. One-in-three (33%) voters who are not affiliated with either major party also are likely Trump voters, including 16% who say they are Very Likely to vote for him if he runs third-party.

Even 19% of Democrats describe themselves as likely Trump voters, although that includes just nine percent (9%) who say they are Very Likely to vote that way.

Rasmussen Reports spokesman Leon Sculti is available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send e-mail to leon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

Right now, Trump leads the pack of 16 major Republican presidential hopefuls, going into their first debate this week.

Forty-six percent (46%) of all voters say they have voted for an independent candidate not affiliated with either major political party. Among these voters, 34% say they are likely to vote for Trump if he ends up running as a third-party presidential candidate, including 18% who say they are Very Likely to do so.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 28-29, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

At this early stage of the game, name recognition is key, and the headlines Trump has been making in recent weeks have undoubtedly helped push him to the top of the heap.

Here’s how all the presidential hopefuls stack up so far.

Men are more likely than women to have voted for an independent candidate. Blacks are less likely to have voted that way compared to whites and other minority voters.

Trump is a more attractive third-party candidate to men and younger voters than he is to women and those 40 and over.

Interestingly, roughly one-third of both conservative and liberal voters say they are likely to vote for Trump if he runs third-party, while 74% of moderates say they are Not At All Likely to do so.

Thirty-four percent (34%) of voters who think the country is heading down the wrong track say they are likely to vote for Trump if he’s a third-party candidates, but just 21% of those who say the country is heading in the right direction agree.

As each candidate formally announced in recent weeks, Rasmussen Reports asked voters in their respective parties what they think of the candidate and how they rate his or her chances to be their party’s nominee next year. Bush is seen as having the best shot among Republicans, with 56% who see him as the likely nominee, but his last name is a drawback for some.

Hillary Clinton remains far and away the leader for the Democratic nomination. But some in her party worry about her electability given the controversies swirling around her, and Vice President Joe Biden is now reportedly exploring a presidential bid to challenge her. Rasmussen Reports will survey on Biden later this week.

In January 2012 just before the last presidential primary season kicked off, only six percent (6%) of Likely Republican Voters said they were prepared to vote third-party if their favorite didn’t win the party nomination.

Sixty-three percent (63%) of all voters said later that year that the current electoral setup discourages third-party challenges.

The GOP appears on the brink of civil war, so if Bush, anathema to many conservatives because of his moderate views on illegal immigration and his support of the Common Core national education standards, wins the party nomination, will many right-leaning voters bolt?

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_c...t_is_trump
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08-07-2015, 01:39 AM
Post: #87
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
For some Republicans, a Trump victory looks increasingly possible
ReutersBy By James Oliphant and Emily Flitter | Reuters

CLEVELAND (Reuters) - Four years ago, only one Republican candidate was consistently hitting the same kind of polling heights among the presidential field that real estate mogul Donald Trump is reaching now. His name was Mitt Romney.

The fact that Romney went on to capture his party’s nomination should be, at the very least, one basic reason why Trump’s recent surge can’t be dismissed as the aberration that so many pundits and party strategists claim it is.

That doesn’t mean, of course, that Trump, who will command center stage at the first Republican presidential debate on Thursday, is going to wind up the party’s nominee a year from now. There are significant obstacles in his path: his history of supporting liberal causes, his sclerotic campaign organization and his limited appeal - so far - to a narrow swath of Republican voters.

Still, some Republicans, especially those outside of Washington, are urging the party to take Trump’s bid seriously, arguing that it’s not out of the question that he could shock the world and win the primary.

Craig Robinson, the former chairman of the Iowa Republican Party, sees echoes of the current president in Trump's run, saying Trump is another product of the media environment.

"Obama was a brand. Donald Trump is a brand. At the end of the day it was really cool to be an Obama supporter and really uncool to be a McCain or Romney supporter," said Robinson, who is neutral in the Republican primary.

Steve Deace, an influential conservative radio host in Iowa, said those within the Republican party who are dismissing Trump's chances of securing the Republican presidential nomination “are underestimating just how fed up the base is with the feckless actions of this political party.”

Trump, who has made incendiary comments about Mexican immigrants, is dominating polls that suggest he is riding a wave of anti-immigrant and anti-establishment fervor. The big question is whether he can ride that wave all the way to the Republican nominating convention in Cleveland, Ohio, in July 2016.

ROOM TO GROW

To do that, "he’s going to need to do one of the harder things in politics - bring scores of new voters into the primary voting process," Deace said.

That’s because, while Trump’s support within the party at the moment appears to be relatively substantial compared to the rest of the presidential field, it is also limited.

He attracts male voters who are less educated, less affluent, and less religious than the Republican electorate as a whole, according to a Reuters/Ipsos survey of almost 2,000 Republicans conducted last month.

It showed 61 percent of Trump supporters to be male and almost half of those surveyed in the poll said they weren’t religious. Over half had not attended college and almost 20 percent earned less than $50,000 a year.

To win the nomination, Trump would need to widen his appeal by attracting social conservatives in greater numbers than he’s doing now as well as more upscale, college-educated voters and women voters.

To that end, Trump is showing signs of wanting to be more than a celebrity contender. Slowly, he’s beginning to build organizations in the key early primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire to compete for voters.

In Iowa, Trump has hired Chuck Laudner, a well respected operative who in 2012 worked for the underfunded and little-known Rick Santorum, the candidate who shocked the national political scene by tying Romney in the caucuses.

A religious conservative, Laudner signing on with Trump was viewed by some in Iowa as a surprise and it could mean that Trump will be able to expand his base of support. Last month, Trump raised eyebrows when he told an Iowa audience that he had never sought forgiveness from God for anything.

"I don't bring God into that picture. I don't," Trump said.

“Chuck Laudner’s a true believer in the Christian right,” said Douglas Gross, a Republican strategist in Iowa. “Ideologically, [he and Trump] couldn’t be farther apart."

In New Hampshire, Trump already has a chairman in each county in the state.

“I’ve been part of campaigns for the past 20 years in New Hampshire, and I’m seeing all the right things being done to put him in a very good position for the primary,” said Lou Garguilo, a county co-chair for Trump.

Of the candidate’s appeal, Garguilo said, “What I love about him is he’s a successful businessman who’s built a very large business. He speaks plainly, He talks about issues that are of grave concern to many of us, things like healthcare, border security, China.”

Most important, “He tells it like it is,” Garguilo said.

STRIKING A CHORD

There’s little doubt that Trump has tapped into a segment of the party that is concerned about immigration, trade, outsourcing, and the erosion of middle-class jobs in the United States.

Another successful businessman, Ross Perot, voiced similar concerns. In his independent bid for president in 1992, he secured 19 percent of the vote. His presence helped define the issues in the race.

Trump is doing something similar for the Republicans. “Right now, this election is about immigration," said Vincent DeVito, a Republican election lawyer and strategist who worked for Romney in 2012. "Donald Trump made it about immigration."

Trump’s anti-establishment appeal and his contempt for party orthodoxy are also seen as drawcards for many voters frustrated by a political elite they see as disconnected from the issues that matter most to middle class Americans.

In a CBS News poll released this week, Trump scored the highest among Republican candidates (30 percent) with voters who said they were angry at Washington.

“The environment is ripe for anti-Washington, anti-politician candidacy. The more the Republican establishment circles the wagons, the more people are attracted to him,” said Joe Trippi, the strategist who helped engineer Democrat Howard Dean’s insurgent presidential bid in 2004.

Trippi said that the large Republican field — there are 17 declared candidates — could work to Trump’s advantage, meaning he would need a smaller share of the Republican electorate to win primaries.

“However improbable it is that Trump emerges as the nominee, I would not bet against him,” Trippi said. “He can win states with 25 percent or 30 percent of the vote.”

All of it is easier said than done. That same CBS News poll showed Trump to have the highest negative ratings of any Republican in the field.

There have been other recent celebrity candidate flameouts. Eight years ago, the contenders who were leading the national polls during the summer of 2007 were Rudolph Giuliani, the ex-New York mayor, and Fred Thompson, the former star of TV’s “Law and Order.”

Both were gone from the race within six months.

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/republicans-tr...13033.html
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08-07-2015, 04:31 AM
Post: #88
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
They keep saying "shocking" it's not shocking to normal people. Just the media elites who want to control the narrative.

They are very pissed because they are trying to continue to tell us who to vote for and who to choose from.

Remember, journalists and doctors are trained and taught that they are better than us and they really believe it.

--I Eat Grits--
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08-07-2015, 04:54 AM
Post: #89
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
If Trump becomes the next POTUS, I will eat my hat.

come for the calo, stay for the yoshida brotha
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08-07-2015, 04:57 AM
Post: #90
RE: The Candidacy of Donald Trump
(08-07-2015 04:54 AM)Winnson Wrote:  If Trump becomes the next POTUS, I will eat my hat.
I said that about a black guy.

My tummy hurts.

--I Eat Grits--
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