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Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
10-27-2015, 09:29 PM
Post: #31
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
great contributions on this thread

it's amazing how Gen. Clarke's "prediction" basically came true to the tee

yemen was one of the countries to be attacked
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11-06-2015, 04:12 PM
Post: #32
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
Quote:IraqiSuryani ‏@IraqiSuryani1 14h14 hours ago
#Yemen - #Russian Ilyushin-78 plane arrived in Sanaa's international airport carrying 20 tonnes of humanitarian aid.

[Image: CTD1bPjUEAAHVW8.jpg]
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11-06-2015, 04:16 PM
Post: #33
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
Russia doing good deeds once again.

Congrats Russia!
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11-11-2015, 03:32 PM
Post: #34
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
http://www.moonofalabama.org/2015/11/yem...oyees.html

Yemen: UN Gives Cover For U.S. Spies - Endangers Its Employees

On October 26 UN reporter Mathew Lee of InnerCity Press scooped all other media with this nugget on Yemen:

Quote:Inner City Press' sources exclusively tell it of a new low, that the UN brought into Sana'a what the Houthis call two members of US intelligence, with the cover identification that they work for the company running the former hotel now occupied by the UN. But, the sources say, security in Sana'a recognized the two and they are now detained.

The "contractors" flew to Sanaa from Djibouti where the U.S. has a large military and intelligence base. The plane the "contractors" came on was rented by the UN.

The Houthis surely wondered why at that time, with Sanaa being under intense Saudi-U.S. air attacks, "hotel contractors" would arrive in Sanaa.

Now one of the "contractors" died, allegedly by suicide, while imprisoned by the Houthis. USAToday reports that his name is John Hamen from Chesapeake, Va. and that his body is currently repatriated to be buried at Arlington Cemetery. For a "hotel contractor" Hamen has a rather interesting resumé:

Quote:U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric told CBS that she could not confirm the contractors' nationality but said they arrived on a U.N. aircraft from Djibouti on Oct. 20 and were detained by "the authorities at the airport in Sanaa."
He said the two "are not U.N. contractors" but work for the company that manages the facilities that the U.N. is using in Sanaa, CBS reported.

Hamen's LinkedIn professional page lists his occupation as "Diplomatic Support" and described his previous employers as the U.S. Special Operations Command, the U.S. Army, and the Joint Communications Support Element.

Is that the qualification one needs to run a former hotel for the UN?

The Joint Communications Support Element is an interesting shop:

Quote:JCSE [..] is composed of joint active duty, Guard and Reserve personnel who can globally deploy within hours of notification to provide communications packages tailored to the specific needs of a full joint task force headquarters and to a joint special operations task force.
These two "contractors" and "former" U.S. special forces were anything but regular civilian staff. The were probably preparing to set up a new U.S. military or intelligence communications hub in Sanaa.

The UN has bungled the Yemen issue since the moment that former president Saleh left his office. It was tasked with setting up a new governance structure that would administrate Yemen and organize elections to replace the interim president Hadi. But the UN driven National Dialog Conference left out the interests of the most important forces on the ground which had helped to push for Saleh's ouster, the Houthis. Left without representation in the UN advised structures the Houthis took over Sanaa and the government. Under Saudi pressure the UN envoy to Yemen resigned.

Now the Saudis and the U.S. wage war on Yemen to kick out the Houthis and to reinstall Hadi who no Yemeni wants back in power. While the Saudis are committing war crimes in Yemen they now also occupy an important seat at the UN Human Rights Council. The UN also bungled the current ceasefire negotiations between the Houthi and the Saudi-U.S. alliance:

Quote:Inner City Press previously reported on and published the Houthis' letter denouncing UN envoy Ould Cheikh Ahmed as little more than a Saudi tool. Now it's gotten worse: even Kenny Gluck who works for the envoy and went to Muscat trying to meet the Houthis was unable. He waited then returned to Riyadh.
...
The Saudis, asserting control, have told Ould Cheikh Ahmed to try to cut Oman out, sources tell Inner City Press, hence the idea the talks will be in Geneva. But what talks, if the Houthis won't talk to Ould Cheikh Ahmed or his Kenny Gluck.

The Houthis accused the new UN envoy of falsely asserting that they agreed to all Saudi conditions while ignoring the spread of al-Qaeda in southern Yemen. The Russians, also haggling with the Saudis, seem to be the only other party concerned over the spread of al-Qaeda and terrorism in Yemen under the Saudi war cover.

The UN has completely abdicated any neutrality on Yemen. It serves as a mere mouthpiece and servant of misguided U.S.-Saudi policies. The now confirmed, though not admitted, transporting of "former" U.S. special forces under UN cover is an inexcusable breach of its independence and a danger to all its employees.

Any UN envoy or contractor all over the world will now be under suspicion of being a U.S. military or intelligence agent. This will endanger the lives of thousands of UN employees working under difficult circumstances in various conflict areas.

Meanwhile the Saudis and the UAE are pulling all ground forces out of Yemen and are outsourcing their war to soldiers from Sudan, Mauritania, Senegal and Eritrea as well as to mercenaries from Columbia. After the UAE pullback the Houthis have recovered several southern Yemeni cities and are planing to re-capturing the Al-Anad airbase near Aden.

Posted by b on November 10, 2015 at 06:33 AM

! This post was funded by the goverment of the Russian Federation !
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11-12-2015, 11:07 AM
Post: #35
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
The Houthis seem to be a very formidable military force.
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11-13-2015, 04:01 PM
Post: #36
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
[Image: CTjFo27UwAAHpEp.png:large]
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12-31-2015, 11:06 AM
Post: #37
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
WARNING:

Photos of starving Yemeni civilians:

https://twitter.com/Undermyskin75/status...7290060800

^^^ Seen plenty more floating around the net.

Even the Jihadist PR firm Al Jazeera is acknowledging the gravity of the situation:

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/09/10...10445.html
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12-31-2015, 11:15 AM
Post: #38
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
Very sad. Another war supported by Obama.
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01-10-2016, 08:36 AM
Post: #39
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
Quote:By any measure, Saudi Arabian Oil Co. is in a league of its own.

Take its oil reserves -- roughly 260 billion barrels, nearly 10 times those of the global ultra-major Exxon Mobil Corp. Or its daily production -- 10 million barrels, more than the domestic output of every U.S. oil company combined.

Which is why the mere suggestion that this state-owned oil giant might go public seems so outlandish. Would the Kingdom of Oil really place its crown jewel in the hands of fickle investors?

The answer is maybe. On Friday, Saudi Aramco confirmed it was studying options to allow "broad public participation in its equity through the listing in the capital markets" of either the whole group or a subsidiary.

The statement came a day after Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom’s deputy crown prince, said in a newspaper interview that Aramco, the linchpin of the world oil market, was considering an initial public offering as Riyadh confronts the hard economic and geopolitical realities of cheaper and cheaper crude.

An excerpt of the news release issued by Saudi Aramco.

[Image: -1x-1.jpg]

It’s impossible to overstate the power Aramco wields in Saudi Arabia and the global oil market. The company traces its origins back to the oil shortages of World War I and is deeply intertwined with the rise of one of the most powerful forces of the past half century: the modern petro state.

What is that worth? “Trillions of dollars,” according to The Economist, which first reported the prince’s comments. That would easily rank Aramco among the world’s most valuable companies, well above Apple Inc., at $600 billion. Based simply on its oil reserves and using a conservative valuation of roughly $10 per barrel, Aramco could be worth more than $2.5 trillion.

And yet stock market investors rarely value state-owned oil companies as dispassionately as the numbers suggest -- or as government officials might hope. Should Aramco go public, it might actually fetch as little as $100 billion, based on valuations applied to similar state-owned groups.
Rosneft, Petrobras

Russia’s Rosneft OAO is paradigmatic. The Kremlin-owned company is the largest oil producer in Russia and one of the largest in the world. It pumps 5 million barrels a day -- far more than Chevron Corp. Yet its market capitalization is just $35 billion, a fraction of Chevron’s $160 billion.

Petroleo Brasileiro SA is worth even less, $23 billion, even though it controls nearly every aspect of Brazil’s oil industry. Of all the major state-owned oil groups, only Chinese companies such as PetroChina Co. have large market capitalizations, running in the hundreds of billions of dollars.

The reasons? One is political risk, real or perceived. Investors often worry governments will put their interests ahead of shareholders. Others are a lack of transparency and, in some cases, corruption.

In the case of Saudi Arabia, Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and a former senior oil official at the White House, said that some people have “raised questions about the true size” of Saudi Aramco’s oil reserves. The kingdom has never published an audit of the reserves. Most details about the size of its giant fields remain secret.

What’s more, “Aramco has obligations beyond producing just oil that other publicly listed companies do not have, such as, for example, running a good part of the health-care system,” Bordoff said.

Granted, Saudi Aramco is widely regarded as the closest that a state oil company can get to an Exxon. It has a reputation for meritocracy going back to its days as a subsidiary of the predecessors of Exxon and Chevron. It is also a leader in petroleum engineering technology.
Enthusiastic About IPO

Salman, the prince, told The Economist he was “enthusiastic” about a potential stock offering.

“This is something that is being reviewed, and we believe a decision will be made over the next few months,” the prince was quoted as saying, adding that an IPO would bring “transparency” to Aramco.

The IPO discussions are preliminary and Riyadh could opt to list smaller units within Saudi Aramco, such as one of its giant domestic refineries, as a first step.

On Friday, Aramco said one option was to float "a bundle its downstream subsidiaries." That could create a valuation benchmark for the whole company, without the risk of placing a value on its oil reserves or losing face should the stock later decline.

The Saudi move comes as oil prices trade at their lowest in 12 years, flirting with the $30 a barrel level as OPEC floods the market and Chinese demand slows down. On Friday, Brent crude, the global oil benchmark, traded at $34.50 a barrel.

For investors, a smaller chunk of Aramco could be easier to value -- and to swallow. And the kingdom has already some experience. In January 2008, it listed a venture called Rabigh Refining and Petrochemical Co., with Aramco retaining a 37.5 percent stake, Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd. another 37.5 percent and the rest sold into the local market. Rabigh, which processes about 400,000 barrels a day, is today worth about $2.4 billion.

The Rabigh listing also showed the enormous interest within Saudi Arabia to get a piece of the country’s oil jewels. The IPO was five time oversubscribed, with 4.5 million Saudis buying shares.

Yet Rabigh is also an example of the potential pitfalls. As news hit Thursday of the possible IPO for Aramco, Rabigh shares fell to an all-time low, leaving them down 51 percent since the IPO.

That shows that while Aramco may be in a league of its own, it still faces the same challenge as everyone else in the oil business: the lowest crude prices in 12 years.
(Adds Aramco confirmation of IPO in fourth paragraph.)
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01-10-2016, 08:37 AM
Post: #40
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2...of-its-own
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04-15-2016, 03:51 PM
Post: #41
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
https://southfront.org/jordanian-militar...r-reports/

Quote:Jordanian military will replace UAE forces in Yemen war: reports

The Saudi defense minister Price Mohammad met King Abdullah in the Jordanian port city of Aqaba and signed a bulk of agreements, including on the development of military cooperation.

On Thursday, Yemen’s Khabar news agency, citing informed sources, reported that the Jordanian military forces and advisers will be replacing UAE troops fighting in the Saudi war on Yemen and the decision had been made following a recent visit by Saudi deputy crown prince Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud to Jordan.

The report said that the Saudi defense minister Price Mohammad met King Abdullah in the Jordanian port city of Aqaba and signed a bulk of agreements, including on the development of military cooperation.

According to the report, the deployment of Jordanian forces will now be coming after the United Arab Emirates withdrew the bulk of its military force from Yemen’s Ma’rib following a series of military setbacks. Emirati authorities are reportedly angry with a Saudi decision to dismiss a former general with close ties to the UAE.

Last July, the Jordanian military forces reportedly took part in the Saudi operation in Aden following the flight of Saudi-backed militiamen loyal to former president Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi.

On March 26, 2015, Saudi Arabia launched its military aggression against Yemen to bring Saudi backed Hadi back to power and undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement. It is reported that more than 9400 people have been killed and at least 16,000 injured including children and women. And due to the Saudi airstrikes, the country’s facilities and infrastructure including hospitals, schools, and factories were heavily destroyed.
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01-18-2017, 09:49 AM
Post: #42
RE: Saudi Arabia + "10 countries" attack Yemen capital
He's an English actor/comedian:

Quote:Pegg News ‏@simonpegg Jan 13

British bombs are falling on #Yemen -1.5m children face starvation. Tell your local MP it must stop http://po.st/RedLineYemen #RedLineForYemen

https://twitter.com/simonpegg/status/819864957512806400
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