Login | Register

Post Reply 
Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
06-29-2020, 08:15 PM
Post: #1
Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
[Image: wjYBMc2Tk3kZe7_6xxfVgu82v-X9odA6JQvd9NgO...be2483d8bd]

Those who know, know! Big Grin
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-29-2020, 08:43 PM
Post: #2
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
Is that what they kids call white privilege?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 02:10 AM
Post: #3
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
I take it that it's an elevator.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 03:07 AM
Post: #4
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
[Image: josie-6-bertha-6-sophia-10-oyster-shucke...c-1024.jpg]

Josie, six years old, Bertha, six years old, Sophie, 10 years old, they work in an oyster factory. South Carolina, United States of America. 1911

[Image: f0ae067d488f4d1728da5dd7aa31355d.jpg]

Rose Berdych, 7 years old, Bluffton, South Carolina oyster factory. Rosie is Polish from Austro-Hungary.

Here's an article about her:https://morningsonmaplestreet.com/2015/0...e-berdych/

And here is the US Library of Congress photo collection:https://www.loc.gov/collections/national...3Alot+7476

! This post was funded by the goverment of the Russian Federation !
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 12:50 PM
Post: #5
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
men esp. of the lower classes have had it very bad throughout history, yet feminists conveniently deny this.

Most of the chauvinism happened in the UPPER CLASSES where wealthy men could have the upper hand most of the time.

Also an aristocratic woman always had more privilege than a common man.. so the real issue is CLASS not GENDER.

China has had many female head of states, how could this be possible? that is because female nobility had more privilege than 99% of males in imperial China.

people are not seeing things clearly.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 02:44 PM
Post: #6
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
ah the "good ol' days".......


maybe good-life future generations will look back on us and think how they have it better than us?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 06:57 PM
Post: #7
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
(06-29-2020 08:43 PM)Skookum Charlie Wrote:  Is that what they kids call white privilege?
I think it's called "black face".

--I Eat Grits--
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 07:05 PM
Post: #8
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
Where is my reparations?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
06-30-2020, 11:43 PM (This post was last modified: 07-01-2020 12:33 AM by pilgrim.)
Post: #9
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
(06-30-2020 07:05 PM)Redneck Wrote:  Where is my reparations?

You don't get reparations, you get to enjoy your white privilege instead.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-01-2020, 02:41 AM
Post: #10
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
(06-30-2020 12:50 PM)pug-thug Wrote:  men esp. of the lower classes have had it very bad throughout history, yet feminists conveniently deny this.

Most of the chauvinism happened in the UPPER CLASSES where wealthy men could have the upper hand most of the time.

Also an aristocratic woman always had more privilege than a common man.. so the real issue is CLASS not GENDER.

China has had many female head of states, how could this be possible? that is because female nobility had more privilege than 99% of males in imperial China.

people are not seeing things clearly.

The palaces were literally 'manned' by eunuchs, no?

More male privilege?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-01-2020, 06:46 PM
Post: #11
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
As i understand these arent Coalminers from Belgian origine but infact Irish (WHITE) slaves captured by The Englishkingdom

Quote:The Irish slave trade began when 30,000 Irish prisoners were sold as slaves to the New World. The King James I Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.
Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.
From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.
During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.
Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.
As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.
African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.
In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.
England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.
There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on its own to end its participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.
But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.
Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

ILM - Irish Lives Matter (Too)
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-02-2020, 05:13 AM
Post: #12
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
.
Good read, Glimmer.

So do we need to prepare reparations for the Irish now also?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-02-2020, 05:25 AM
Post: #13
RE: Belgian Coal Miners, Circa 1900
Quote:Barbary Pirates and English Slaves

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/Hi...sh-Slaves/

For over 300 years, the coastlines of the south west of England were at the mercy of Barbary pirates (corsairs) from the coast of North Africa, based mainly in the ports of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli. Their number included not only North Africans but also English and Dutch privateers. Their aim was to capture slaves for the Arab slave markets in North Africa.

The Barbary pirates attacked and plundered not only those countries bordering the Mediterranean but as far north as the English Channel, Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, with the western coast of England almost being raided at will.

[Image: MYmYL6b.jpg]

Partly as a result of an inadequate naval deterrent, by the early 17th century the situation was so bad that an entry in the Calendar of State Papers in May 1625 stated, ‘The Turks are upon our coasts. They take ships only to take the men to make slaves of them.’

Barbary pirates raided on land as well as at sea. In August 1625 corsairs raided Mount’s Bay, Cornwall, capturing 60 men, women and children and taking them into slavery. In 1626 St Keverne was repeatedly attacked, and boats out of Looe, Penzance, Mousehole and other Cornish ports were boarded, their crews taken captive and the empty ships left to drift. It was feared that there were around 60 Barbary men-of-war prowling the Devon and Cornish coasts and attacks were now occurring almost daily.

Sir John Eliot, Vice Admiral of Devon, declared that the seas around England “seem’d theirs.”

The situation was so bad that in December 1640 a Committee for Algiers was set up by Parliament to oversee the ransoming of captives. At that time it was reported that there were some 3,000 to 5,000 English people in captivity in Algiers. Charities were also set up to help ransom the captives and local fishing communities clubbed together to raise money to liberate their own.

In 1645, another raid by Barbary pirates on the Cornish coast saw 240 men, women and children kidnapped. The following year Parliament sent Edmund Cason to Algiers to negotiate the ransom and release of English captives. He paid on average £30 per man (women were more expensive to ransom) and managed to free some 250 people before he ran out of money. Cason spent the last 8 years of his life trying to arrange the release of a further 400.

By the 1650s the attacks were so frequent that they threatened England’s fishing industry with fishermen reluctant to put to sea, leaving their families unprotected ashore.

Oliver Cromwell decided to take action and decreed that any captured corsairs should be taken to Bristol and slowly drowned. Lundy Island, where pirates from the Republic of Salé had made their base, was attacked and bombarded, but despite this, the corsairs continued to mount raids on the coastal towns and villages in Cornwall, Devon and Dorset.

Those kidnapped would be sent to the slave markets of the Ottoman Empire to be bought as labourers or concubines, or pressed into the galleys where they would man the oars. The Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes, author of ‘Don Quixote’, was a captive in Algiers between 1575 and 1580, when he was ransomed by his parents and the Trinitarians, a Catholic religious order.

[Image: 96CMEtL.jpg]

The Barbary slave trade even features in Samuel Pepys’ diary, in an entry from 8th February 1661:

‘…went to the Fleece Tavern to drink; and there we spent till four o’clock, telling stories of Algiers, and the manner of the life of slaves there! And truly Captn. Mootham and Mr. Dawes (who have been both slaves there) did make me fully acquainted with their condition there: as, how they eat nothing but bread and water. … How they are beat upon the soles of their feet and bellies at the liberty of their padron. How they are all, at night, called into their master’s Bagnard; and there they lie. How the poorest men do use their slaves best. How some rogues do live well, if they do invent to bring their masters in so much a week by their industry or theft; and then they are put to no other work at all. And theft there is counted no great crime at all…’

Something had to be done. In 1675 Sir John Narborough, backed by a Royal Navy squadron, managed to negotiate a peace with Tunis. A heavy naval bombardment by the British then brought about a similar peace with Tripoli.

[Image: meTIkO7.jpg]

Algiers was also attacked from the sea, not only by British warships but also by the French and Spanish. The United States fought two wars against the Barbary States of North Africa: the First Barbary War of 1801–1805 and the Second Barbary War, 1815 – 1816. Finally after an attack by the British and Dutch in 1816 more than 4,000 Christian slaves were liberated and the power of the Barbary pirates was broken.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Dementia Joe: Coal Miners should ‘Learn’ to Code: Anybody ‘Can Learn How to Code! pug-thug 4 280 01-02-2020 11:24 PM
Last Post: Skookum Charlie
  Nintendo Gaming Headquarters Circa 1889 pug-thug 2 986 01-28-2018 02:04 AM
Last Post: SometimesThe Heart of a Turtle
  Ku Klux Klan Application Form circa 1920 pug-thug 10 3,729 10-27-2017 06:01 PM
Last Post: pilgrim
  Andrew Dice Clay circa 1987. Internet would explode if done today pug-thug 5 3,129 06-28-2016 08:32 AM
Last Post: pug-thug

Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)