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Something to think about - Millenial health decline
10-10-2019, 01:09 AM
Post: #1
Something to think about - Millenial health decline
Something to think about...

Health insurance companies by their very nature use highly paid actuaries to compile the best possible medical data to ensure they make a profit for their shareholders. Knowing mortality rates is crucial to properly predicting death rates and thus profiting in the insurance industry. The Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurance association reports that millennials — the first generation to grow up using cell phones on an every-day basis — are experiencing a recognizable and unprecedented decline in their health by the time they’ve reached their late 20s.

It's also noteworthy that millennials are the first generation to grow up with a highly processed food diet within an environment — all food, water, soil and air — that's contaminated with glyphosate and 1000s of additional chemicals, some known, some still unknown.

And again notable that millennials are the first generation to grow up surrounded by dozens of computer-chip based electrical components (cell phones, computers, cars, appliances, cameras, monitors, cell towers, etc) that produce radio frequency pollution.

The Health Of Millenials • Blue Cross - Blue Shield
Blue Health Intelligence Report
Published April 24, 2019

https://www.bcbs.com/sites/default/files...BzpzY6T9hg

Ask for the blue pill. The rabbit hole isn't that nice
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10-10-2019, 01:45 AM
Post: #2
RE: Something to think about - Millenial health decline
change usually = growing pains and so a generation or few will suffer until those nanobots and other advances become mainstream when the next stage of evolution takes place as the merging of man/machine.
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10-10-2019, 01:54 AM
Post: #3
RE: Something to think about - Millenial health decline
Quote:Irakli Loladze is a mathematician by training, but he was in a biology lab when he encountered the puzzle that would change his life. It was in 1998, and Loladze was studying for his Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Against a backdrop of glass containers glowing with bright green algae, a biologist told Loladze and a half-dozen other graduate students that scientists had discovered something mysterious about zooplankton.

Zooplankton are microscopic animals that float in the world’s oceans and lakes, and for food they rely on algae, which are essentially tiny plants. Scientists found that they could make algae grow faster by shining more light onto them—increasing the food supply for the zooplankton, which should have flourished. But it didn’t work out that way. When the researchers shined more light on the algae, the algae grew faster, and the tiny animals had lots and lots to eat—but at a certain point they started struggling to survive. This was a paradox. More food should lead to more growth. How could more algae be a problem?

Loladze was technically in the math department, but he loved biology and couldn’t stop thinking about this. The biologists had an idea of what was going on: The increased light was making the algae grow faster, but they ended up containing fewer of the nutrients the zooplankton needed to thrive. By speeding up their growth, the researchers had essentially turned the algae into junk food. The zooplankton had plenty to eat, but their food was less nutritious, and so they were starving.

Loladze used his math training to help measure and explain the algae-zooplankton dynamic. He and his colleagues devised a model that captured the relationship between a food source and a grazer that depends on the food. They published that first paper in 2000. But Loladze was also captivated by a much larger question raised by the experiment: Just how far this problem might extend.

“What struck me is that its application is wider,” Loladze recalled in an interview. Could the same problem affect grass and cows? What about rice and people? “It was kind of a watershed moment for me when I started thinking about human nutrition,” he said.

https://www.politico.com/agenda/story/20...a9YpBwB1k0
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