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Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
03-17-2019, 11:32 PM
Post: #1
Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
shoddy engineering. Boeing's rep has taken a HUGE HIT




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03-18-2019, 02:39 AM
Post: #2
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
Apparently the software will override the pilot's input.

And they can't just pull up on the joystick, they have to flick some switch. But the plane doesn't tell them it is overriding them, so basically it just starts plunging for no reason (the software thinks it is preventing stall, which it is but surely divebombing to Earth is more dangerous than stalling).

Of course, if software can override a pilot's input, that also makes it ripe for hacking, remote control, wouldn't ya say?
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03-18-2019, 04:58 AM
Post: #3
Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
The Best Analysis Of What Really Happened To The Boeing 737 Max From A Pilot & Software Engineer https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-1...e-engineer // WeAreTheNewMedia.com

The following tweets from Trevor Sumner, CEO of Perch Experience, of what really happened to the Boeing 737 Max, may be one of the best summaries of the events that led to the two recent airplane crashes, and also why Boeing's "software upgrade" response is a farce.



1of x: BEST analysis of what really is happening on the #Boeing737Max issue from my brother in law @davekammeyer, who’s a pilot, software engineer & deep thinker. Bottom line don’t blame software that’s the band aid for many other engineering and economic forces in effect.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

Some people are calling the 737MAX tragedies a #software failure. Here's my response: It's not a software problem. It was an

* Economic problem that the 737 engines used too much fuel, so they decided to install more efficient engines with bigger fans and make the 737MAX.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

This led to an

* Airframe problem. They wanted to use the 737 airframe for economic reasons, but needed more ground clearance with bigger engines.The 737 design can't be practically modified to have taller main landing gear. The solution was to mount them higher & more forward.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

This led to an

* Aerodynamic problem. The airframe with the engines mounted differently did not have adequately stable handling at high AoA to be certifiable. Boeing decided to create the MCAS system to electronically correct for the aircraft's handling deficiencies.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

During the course of developing the MCAS, there was a

* Systems engineering problem. Boeing wanted the simplest possible fix that fit their existing systems architecture, so that it required minimal engineering rework, and minimal new training for pilots and maintenance crews.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

The easiest way to do this was to add some features to the existing Elevator Feel Shift system. Like the #EFS system, the #MCAS relies on non-redundant sensors to decide how much trim to add. Unlike the EFS system, MCAS can make huge nose down trim changes.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

On both ill-fated flights, there was a:
* Sensor problem. The AoA vane on the 737MAX appears to not be very reliable and gave wildly wrong readings. On #LionAir, this was compounded by a

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

* Maintenance practices problem. The previous crew had experienced the same problem and didn't record the problem in the maintenance logbook. This was compounded by a:

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

* Pilot training problem. On LionAir, pilots were never even told about the MCAS, and by the time of the Ethiopian flight, there was an emergency AD issued, but no one had done sim training on this failure. This was compounded by an:

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

* Economic problem. Boeing sells an option package that includes an extra AoA vane, and an AoA disagree light, which lets pilots know that this problem was happening. Both 737MAXes that crashed were delivered without this option. No 737MAX with this option has ever crashed.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

All of this was compounded by a:

* Pilot expertise problem. If the pilots had correctly and quickly identified the problem and run the stab trim runaway checklist, they would not have crashed.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

Nowhere in here is there a software problem. The computers & software performed their jobs according to spec without error. The specification was just shitty. Now the quickest way for Boeing to solve this mess is to call up the software guys to come up with another band-aid.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

I'm a software engineer, and we're sometimes called on to fix the deficiencies of mechanical or aero or electrical engineering, because the metal has already been cut or the molds have already been made or the chip has already been fabed, and so that problem can't be solved.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

But the software can always be pushed to the update server or reflashed. When the software band-aid comes off in a 500mph wind, it's tempting to just blame the band-aid.

Follow @davekammeyer if you want to dig in.

— Trevor Sumner (@trevorsumner) March 16, 2019

VISIT ➫ WeAreTheNewMedia.com for a 2018 Updated and Growing List of the #NewMedia!


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03-18-2019, 05:36 AM
Post: #4
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
"On both ill-fated flights, there was a:
* Sensor problem. The AoA vane on the 737MAX appears to not be very reliable and gave wildly wrong readings"

How is this not a software problem?
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03-18-2019, 05:01 PM
Post: #5
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
Software problem, the hardware engineering is fine.
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03-18-2019, 06:38 PM
Post: #6
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
imagine if this was a non-US /masonic company?

would have fixed or highlighted the issue instantly
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03-19-2019, 06:33 PM
Post: #7
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
BEST analysis of what really is happening on the #Boeing737Max issue from my brother in law @davekammeyer, who’s a pilot, software engineer & deep thinker. Bottom line don’t blame software that’s the band aid for many other engineering and economic forces in effect.

Some people are calling the 737MAX tragedies a #software failure. Here's my response: It's not a software problem. It was an

Economic problem that the 737 engines used too much fuel, so they decided to install more efficient engines with bigger fans and make the 737MAX.
Airframe problem. They wanted to use the 737 airframe for economic reasons, but needed more ground clearance with bigger engines.The 737 design can't be practically modified to have taller main landing gear. The solution was to mount them higher & more forward.
Aerodynamic problem. The airframe with the engines mounted differently did not have adequately stable handling at high AoA to be certifiable. Boeing decided to create the MCAS system to electronically correct for the aircraft's handling deficiencies.
During the course of developing the MCAS, there was a:

Systems engineering problem. Boeing wanted the simplest possible fix that fit their existing systems architecture, so that it required minimal engineering rework, and minimal new training for pilots and maintenance crews.
The easiest way to do this was to add some features to the existing Elevator Feel Shift system. Like the #EFS system, the #MCAS relies on non-redundant sensors to decide how much trim to add. Unlike the EFS system, MCAS can make huge nose down trim changes.

On both ill-fated flights, there was a:

Sensor problem. The AoA vane on the 737MAX appears to not be very reliable and gave wildly wrong readings. On #LionAir, this was compounded by a
Maintenance practices problem. The previous crew had experienced the same problem and didn't record the problem in the maintenance logbook. This was compounded by a...
Pilot training problem. On LionAir, pilots were never even told about the MCAS, and by the time of the Ethiopian flight, there was an emergency AD issued, but no one had done sim training on this failure. This was compounded by an..
Economic problem. Boeing sells an option package that includes an extra AoA vane, and an AoA disagree light, which lets pilots know that this problem was happening. Both 737MAXes that crashed were delivered without this option. No 737MAX with this option has ever crashed.
All of this was compounded by a:

Pilot expertise problem. If the pilots had correctly and quickly identified the problem and run the stab trim runaway checklist, they would not have crashed.
Nowhere in here is there a software problem. The computers & software performed their jobs according to spec without error. The specification was just shitty. Now the quickest way for Boeing to solve this mess is to call up the software guys to come up with another band-aid.

I'm a software engineer, and we're sometimes called on to fix the deficiencies of mechanical or aero or electrical engineering, because the metal has already been cut or the molds have already been made or the chip has already been fabed, and so that problem can't be solved.

But the software can always be pushed to the update server or reflashed. When the software band-aid comes off in a 500mph wind, it's tempting to just blame the band-aid.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-1...e-engineer
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04-06-2019, 10:14 AM
Post: #8
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
Family of Ralph Nader's niece killed Ethiopian Airlines crash files the first lawsuit

By Bill Hutchinson Apr 4, 2019 12:40 PM
The first lawsuit stemming from the Ethiopian Airlines crash was filed in Chicago on Thursday by the family of a 24-year-old American woman killed in the disaster, who is the great niece of consumer advocate icon Ralph Nader.

The federal lawsuit was filed by the family of Samyo Stumo, who worked for the health systems development organization ThinkWell in Washington, D.C., and was among the 157 people who perished when the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed last month shortly after taking off from Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia.

The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago names Chicago-based Boeing, the manufacturer of the aircraft and Ethiopian Airlines as defendants. The suit also names Rosemount Aerospace Inc., the Delaware company that made the airplane's flight control system known as MCAS, which is now under scrutiny by investigators.

[Image: samya-stumo-ht-ml-190404_hpMain_16x9_992.jpg]

https://abcnews.go.com/International/law...d=62166217
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04-06-2019, 10:19 AM
Post: #9
RE: Defective Boeing 737 planes have caused 2 fatal crashes already
Quote:August 3, 2016
Mr. Dennis Muilenburg
The Boeing Company
100 North Riverside
Chicago, Illinois 60606

Dear Mr. Muilenberg,
We, as current and former national security professionals, write to express our great concern that the
Boeing Company, along with its subsidiaries, is continuing to pursue a deal with the Islamic Republic of
Iran to provide the country with commercial aircraft, parts, and technicians to modernize its aging
aviation industry. This deal represents more than a business venture with an emerging market; it
represents a legitimization of a State Sponsor of Terror and a direct benefit for a ruling regime responsible
for gross human rights abuses, support for terrorism including threats against the U.S. and its allies, and
continued provocations against the international community in regards to its ballistic missile program.
The reported deal with Iran would send more than a hundred planes to the Islamic Republic, while Iran
attempts to finance the purchase of these aircraft through its opaque and illicit financial sector. We are
aware that Boeing has secured a license from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asset
Control to engage in preliminary discussions with Iran about these sales. However, the prospect of such
sales remains fraught with danger for Boeing and the international community. Given Iran’s regional
destabilizing activity, that danger will be even greater should this deal be finalized. We are also sending a
letter to Airbus to express these same concerns.
In order to finance a deal of this magnitude with Iran, Boeing or one of its subsidiaries will have to
engage Iran’s financial sector in order to receive payment. The banks that finance the deal will have to
work with a country that remains a jurisdiction of primary money laundering concern, as designated by
the U.S. Treasury. The 2011 designation of Iran and its entire financial sector, including its central bank,
was based on “Iran’s support for terrorism; pursuit of weapons of mass destruction (WMD); reliance on
state-owned or controlled agencies to facilitate WMD proliferation; and the illicit and deceptive financial
activities that Iranian financial institutions – including the Central Bank of Iran – and other statecontrolled entities engage in to facilitate Iran’s illicit conduct and evade sanctions.” The Financial Action
Task Force (FATF) called out Iran’s financial sector as suspect, stating in June, “Until Iran implements
the measures required to address the deficiencies identified in the Action Plan, the FATF will remain
concerned with the terrorist financing risk emanating from Iran and the threat this poses to the
international financial system.” These statements represent a joint conclusion by both the U.S. and
international community that Iran has yet to significantly reform its financial sector and is still not
compliant with international banking standards.
Through the terms of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), many Iranian banks, including
the Central Bank of Iran, were de-listed by the U.S. Treasury and the European Union in order to
facilitate Iran agreeing to temporarily roll back its nuclear program. Unfortunately, these financial
institutions have not changed their behavior and may still be facilitating the illicit financial activities that
resulted in their designation in the first place. We also know from recent reports that Iran has attempted to
acquire technology relevant to ballistic missiles and chemical and biological weapons. Additionally, UN
Secretary General Ban Ki-moon stated that Iran is acting in ways inconsistent with the spirit of the
JCPOA by conducting ballistic missile tests and left open that Iran may be violating UN Security Council
resolutions. We are also concerned about reports that Iran may be attempting to acquire materials outside
of the designated procurement channel to clandestinely support its nuclear program and the seizure of
illegal Iranian weapons shipments intended for Houthi militants in Yemen. These incidents demonstrate
that Tehran is engaged in activities contrary to international norms and security.
Lastly, we remain concerned that the aircraft themselves will be used by the Iranian regime to further the
activities of its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) in support of President Bashar al-Assad’s war
machine in Syria. The IRGC has flown weapons and soldiers to Syria to defend the Assad regime and
provides arms to the Houthi rebels in Yemen. It has also supplied thousands of rockets and arms to
Hezbollah in Lebanon, representing a direct threat to the State of Israel. Many of Iran’s airlines, including
Mahan Air, remain designated by the U.S. Treasury for these activities. Iran Air, the recipient of the
aircraft and parts from this deal, was only recently delisted by the U.S. Treasury as a concession in the
JCPOA, and was previously designated for assisting the IRGC and Iranian Ministry of Defense’s
weapons shipments. Iran Air continues to fly direct routes from Iran to Syria, and some of these flights
have originated from known IRGC hubs.
The deal appears to extend beyond any practical need. Iran Air currently only operates around 40
functional aircraft. Iran’s stated goal of acquiring some 500 aircraft would vastly overtake its needs and
represent a huge pool of aviation technology that could be diverted for illicit purposes. We are concerned
that the true intent of Iran Air is likely to lease or resell some of its older aircraft as well as these new
aircraft to other designated Iranian airlines. If diverted and used by designated entities, these aircraft
would be directly supporting terrorism.
As concerned national security practitioners and professionals, we will continue to advocate limiting
resources to Iran that can be utilized to continue and fortify its malign behavior. As Iran continues to
violate international law through its support of global terrorism, gross human rights abuses, and
aggressive behavior to destabilize the Middle East, we promise to increase pressure on Congress, the
administration, and the international community to hold Iran accountable for its actions. We ask that you
consider these issues before selling a significant capability to a country which remains a State Sponsor of
Terror and a threat to the U.S. and our allies.
Sincerely,
Gen. Michael V. Hayden
Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency
and National Security Agency
Sen. Joseph Lieberman
Former U.S. Senator from Connecticut
Judge Michael Mukasey
Former Attorney General of the United States
Hon. George P. Shultz
Former Secretary of State
Elliott Abrams
Former Deputy National Security Advisor for
Global Democracy Strategy
Ilan Berman
Vice President, American Foreign Policy Council
Max Boot
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National
Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
John Cassara
Former Special Agent, U.S. Department of the
Treasury
Hon. Irwin Cotler
Former Minister of Justice and Attorney General
of Canada
Amb. Joseph DeTrani
Former Senior Advisor to the Director of
National Intelligence
Michael Doran
Former Senior Director for Near East and North
African Affairs, U.S. National Security Council
Mark Dubowitz
Executive Director, Foundation for Defense of
Democracies
Reuel Marc Gerecht
Former Middle Eastern specialist, CIA's
Directorate of Operations
Christopher J. Griffin
Executive Director, Foreign Policy Initiative
Lawrence J. Haas
Senior Fellow, American Foreign Policy Council
John Hannah
Former National Security Advisor to the Vice
President of the United States
Olli Heinonen
Former Deputy Director-General for Safeguards,
International Atomic Energy Agency
Jamil Jaffer
Former Chief Counsel and Senior Advisor,
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Matthew Kroenig
Former Special Adviser, Office of the Secretary
of Defense
Robert J. Lieber
Professor of Government and International
Affairs, Georgetown University
Valerie Lincy
Executive Director, Wisconsin Project on
Nuclear Arms Control
Mary Beth Long
Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for
International Security Affairs
Michael Makovsky
President and Chief Executive Officer, Jewish
Institute for National Security Affairs
Ann Marlowe
Visiting Fellow, Hudson Institute
Clifford D. May
President, Foundation for Defense of
Democracies
Robert McBrien
Former Associate Director for Global Targeting,
Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S.
Department of the Treasury
Scott Modell
Senior Advisor, Center for Strategic and
International Studies
Emanuele Ottolenghi
Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of
Democracies
Danielle Pletka
Senior Vice President for Foreign and Defense
Policy Studies, American Enterprise Institute
John Podhoretz
Editor, Commentary Magazine
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