Login | Register

Post Reply 
Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
08-11-2018, 11:59 PM
Post: #1
Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
.
Interesting read that looks at the history of the social media platforms and the ideas behind them and the challenges they are facing.

--

Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created

Who knew connecting the world could get so complicated? Perhaps some of technology's brightest minds should have seen that coming.

Social media bans of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones have thrust Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and others into a role they never wanted — as gatekeepers of discourse on their platforms, deciding what should and shouldn't be allowed and often angering almost everyone in the process. Jones, a right-wing provocateur, suddenly found himself banned from most major social platforms this week, after years in which he was free to use them to promulgate a variety of false claims.

Twitter, which one of its executives once called the "free speech wing of the free speech party," remains a lonely holdout on Jones. The resulting backlash suggests that no matter what the tech companies do, "there is no way they can please everyone," as Scott Shackelford, a business law and ethics professor at Indiana University, observed.

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter's Jack Dorsey and crew, and Google's stewards of YouTube gave little thought to such consequences as they built their empires with lofty goals to connect the world and democratize discourse. At the time, they were the rebels aiming to bypass the stodgy old gatekeepers — newspaper editors, television programmers and other establishment types — and let people talk directly to one another.

"If you go back a decade or so, the whole idea of speech on social media was seen as highly positive light," said Tim Cigelske, who teaches social media at Marquette University in Wisconsin. There was the Arab Spring. There were stories of gay, lesbian and transgender teens from small towns finding support online.

At the same time, of course, the companies were racing to build the largest audiences possible, slice and dice their user data and make big profits by turning that information into lucrative targeted advertisements.

The dark side of untrammeled discourse, the thinking went, would sort itself out as online communities moderated themselves, aided by fast-evolving computer algorithms and, eventually, artificial intelligence.

"They scaled, they built, they wanted to drive revenue as well as user base," said technology analyst Tim Bajarin, president of consultancy Creative Strategies. "That was priority one and controlling content was priority two. It should have been the other way around."

That all got dicier once the election of President Donald Trump focused new attention on fake news and organized misinformation campaigns — not to mention the fact that some of the people grabbing these new social-media megaphones were wild conspiracy theories who falsely call mass shootings a hoax, white nationalists who organize violent rallies and men who threaten women with rape and murder.

While the platforms may not have anticipated the influx of hate speech and meddling from foreign powers like Russia, North Korea and China, Bajarin said, they should have acted more quickly once they found it. "The fact is we're dealing with a brave new world that they've allowed to happen, and they need to take more control to keep it from spreading," he said.

That's easier said than done, of course. But it's particularly difficult for huge tech companies to balance public goods such free speech with the need to protect their users from harassment, abuse, fake news and manipulation. Especially given that their business models require them to alienate as few of their users as possible, lest they put the flood of advertising money at risk.

"Trying to piece together a framework for speech that works for everyone — and making sure we effectively enforce that framework — is challenging," wrote Richard Allan, Facebook's vice president of policy, in a blog post Thursday. "Every policy we have is grounded in three core principles: giving people a voice, keeping people safe, and treating people equitably. The frustrations we hear about our policies — outside and internally as well — come from the inevitable tension between these three principles."

Such tensions force some of the largest corporations in the world to decide, for instance, if banning Nazis also means banning white nationalists — and to figure out how to tell them apart if not. Or whether kicking off Jones means they need to ban all purveyors of false conspiracy theories. Or whether racist comments should be allowed if they are posted, to make a point, by the people who received them.

"I don't think the platforms in their heart of hearts would like to keep Alex Jones on," said Nathaniel Persily, a professor at Stanford Law School. "But it's difficult to come up with a principle to say why Alex Jones and not others would be removed."

While most companies have policies against "hate speech," defining what constitutes hate speech can be difficult, he added. Even governments have trouble with it. One country's free speech is another country's hate speech, punishable by jail time.

Facebook, Twitter, Google, Reddit and others face these questions millions of times a day, as human moderators and algorithms decide which posts, which people, which photos or videos to allow, to kick off or simply make less visible and harder to find. If they allow too much harmful content, they risk losing users and advertisers. If they go too far and remove too much, they face charges of censorship and ideological bias.

"My sense is that they are throwing everything at the wall and seeing what sticks," Persily said. "It's a whack-a-mole problem. It's not the same threats that are continuing, and they have to be nimble enough to deal with new problems."

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/10/the-asso...eated.html
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 04:29 PM
Post: #2
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
CONFIRMED: MARK ZUCKERBERG PERSONALLY MADE DECISION TO BAN INFOWARS
Billionaires now deciding what you can see and read

Confirmed: Mark Zuckerberg Personally Made Decision to Ban Infowars

A New York Times report confirms that Mark Zuckerberg personally made the final decision to ban Infowars.

In an article entitled Facebook Banned Infowars. Now What?, Kevin Roose reveals how, “Late on Sunday, after returning to his hotel room on a trip away from home, Mark Zuckerberg made a decision he had hoped to avoid.”

The report adds that the Facebook CEO “got personally engaged” and “discussed Infowars at length with other executives,” while speculating that Jones may have wanted to get banned to get media attention.

Zuckerberg initially considered whether Infowars was being brigaded by partisan mobs mass reporting of posts (this undoubtedly happened, but only after CNN had engaged in an intense lobbying campaign to have Jones banned).

Zuckerberg decided to remove the Infowars page entirely, rather than just giving the page a strike, when he saw on the news that Apple had removed the Infowars podcast.

“After seeing the news, Mr. Zuckerberg sent a note to his team confirming his own decision: the strikes against Infowars and Mr. Jones would count individually, and the pages would come down. The announcement arrived at 3 a.m. Pacific time,” writes Roose.

This follows the revelation that Apple CEO Tim Cook also personally took the decision to ban the Infowars podcast.

https://www.infowars.com/confirmed-mark-...-infowars/
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 04:35 PM
Post: #3
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
How ironic that a severely socially retarded person is in charge of social media.



Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 04:52 PM
Post: #4
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
i don't think he's making the big decisions at that company

he has the the typical silicon valley geek look, so it probably helps morale when your leader is the stereotypical aspergers nerd type
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 05:57 PM
Post: #5
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
DT started the whole fake news thing to discredit the dinosaur media

Dinosaur media then changed fake news to be about Russia and extreme clickbait

fake news was originally about establishment media LYING through their teeth about various issues
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 06:10 PM
Post: #6
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
He personally made the decision to ban AJ after being "advised" to do so. No public company would let an idiot like him have a say on those issues .
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 06:12 PM
Post: #7
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
yeah

well I'm glad to say they have lost the information war

you can't stop the wave.

in CHina they limit free speech, but then the people just talk in code

for example they refer to Xi as Winnie the Pooh
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 06:17 PM
Post: #8
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
Apparently Zuckerberg still controls most of his board. According to investopedia:



The founder and "face" of Facebook indirectly holds around 14.18 million Class A Facebook shares in a series of funds, as of July 25, 2018. Zuckerberg also owns a whopping 441.6 million Class B shares. Control over nearly 89% of the Class B shares, gives Zuckerberg 60% voting rights in the compnay. Mark Zuckerberg started Facebook in his Harvard dorm room, and has become one of the most famous businessmen in the world. Zuckerberg and Facebook have come under fire in the Cambridge Analytica scandal where it was revealed that the latter accessed user data and used it to target political advertisements. Zuckerberg in a written statement before the House admitted that the company had not done enough to protect its users.



Read more: The Top Shareholders of Facebook | Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/articles/in...z5NwxArzyG
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2018, 06:20 PM
Post: #9
RE: Tech giants are still stumbling in the social world they created
he seems very unassertive and unconfident.

however he may be diff. when he's playing the role of boss

but I think they sent in Sheryl Sandberg as the adult liason between FB and the deep state
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  China launches high-tech bird drones to watch over its citizens pilgrim 0 265 08-05-2018 03:22 AM
Last Post: pilgrim
  BRAVE web browser, created by ousted Mozilla Founder pug-thug 9 499 08-04-2018 07:08 AM
Last Post: kungfool
  Welcome to NEOM, Saudi Arabia's $500-Billion Self-Governed Tech Hub of the Future jho 9 289 06-16-2018 10:06 AM
Last Post: karasu
  Interesting Social Statistic karasu 8 336 06-16-2018 05:15 AM
Last Post: karasu

Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)