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So what's the deal with Stephen King?
04-25-2017, 03:05 PM
Post: #1
So what's the deal with Stephen King?
A few days ago, EY said that this place was like the reunion in Stephen King's "It".
So is King an occultist, or is he just a novelist who happens to like supernatural, dark topics?

King about God:
Quote:In an interview King said:

"I don't see myself as God's stenographer. As someone who believes in God, believes that God is a logical out growth of the fact that life fits together as well as it does, but that doesn't mean that we know God's mind... There's been a lot of criticism of the book[The Stand] where they say the God stuff really turns them off. I'm thinking to myself that these guys have no problems with vampires, demons, golems, werewolves and you name it. If you try to bring in a God who can take sardines and crackers and turn it into loaves and fishes, then these people have a problem.
http://www.adherents.com/people/pk/Stephen_King.html

Stephen King says:
Quote:I hate organized religion. I think it’s one of the roots of real evil that’s in the world. If you really unmask Satan, you’ll probably find that he’s wearing a turnaround collar.
...
The beauty of religious mania is that it has the power to explain everything. Once God (or Satan) is accepted as the first cause of everything which happens in the mortal world, nothing is left to chance… logic can be happily tossed out the window.

http://hollowverse.com/stephen-king/

Quote:King's daughter Naomi was at one time a Unitarian Universalist Church (UUC) minister in Plantation, Florida with her... same-sex partner, Rev. Dr. Thandeka. ... A startling 18% of members of the Unitarian Universalist Church are professed atheists. Obviously, the UUC is a fraud religion, not even remotely related to Christianity. The fundamental belief of the UUC is that there are no fundamental beliefs. Members are free and encouraged to form their own beliefs, choose as they may
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Evils%20i...n_king.htm

About the book "IT":
Quote:Stephen King's IT, a closer look

...the Mr. Gray character in Dreamcatcher is the same evil presence that operates in the town of IT. Just like that Stephen King hints that the Randall Flag character is also in some books (mainly Dark Tower) universally connected with different stories. Some even say that it's all the same evil presence under different names and masks(!). When writing about the Elmstreet series earlier i thought about the relation to IT in regards to the using of fear to traumatise the soul/spirit in order to break them and get closer to them and eventually swallowing them up.
...
It's made clear that as the children grow up they lose something special. Basically their 'magic' or in other words faith, imagination etc. They find out that if they want to defeat IT once and for all they have to get back to this childlike state and find the magic again because it has been 'beaten' out of them via the trauma.
...
IT has it's hand in almost every negative event in the history of the town. You could say that it resembles the evil forces (Illuminati) or in other word The Hidden Hand who orchestrate evil happenings in our world. IT also leaves it's mark this way by for example appearing as Pennywise the Clown at the Mafia-shooting in the book or the giant bird at the fire of the 'black spot'. IT is woven in history and as children some of them have a vision, after attempting to do some shamanic indian ritual, of how old IT is and how it came here (IT Came From Outer Space ) Also the fact that It resides underground and can move itself swiftly through dark underground tunnels connected to a deep sewer system also struck a light with me.

https://forum.davidicke.com/showthread.php?t=233256

About his series The Dark Tower:
Quote:The Dark Tower and Chaos

One of the themes explored is that all stories that have ever been written (fiction of course) actually are reality in some parallel universe. The idea here is that a writer/novelist can actually channel the story because somewhere (on some level of the Tower, if you prefer) the story is actually happening.

Another theme of the book is that time travel is sometimes possible because everything that happens, or has happened, or will happen, or could happen, IS happening right now, all at the same time, just on different planes. This is similar to the above example, but this applies to "real life"... whatever that may mean to you.

The assumption that everything is happening right now, somewhere. This can account for the way chaotes can evoke fictional characters like Chuthu (did I spell that right?) and The Joker and friggin Scrooge McDuck for all I know. All I know is the evokation WORKS, and so the character exists on some level, right?
http://www.occultforum.org/forum/viewtop...f=3&t=9354
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04-25-2017, 04:13 PM
Post: #2
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
He has good taste in music.

Hated Kubrick's "The Shining", which was great.

Loved the Made for TV version, which was terrible.

Probably Illuminati.
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04-25-2017, 09:59 PM
Post: #3
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
He's a left wing loon who probably believes in some kind of vague wishy-washy form of Christianity.
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04-26-2017, 02:52 AM
Post: #4
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
(04-25-2017 04:13 PM)THE_DEAN Wrote:  Probably Illuminati.
I want more info on this.
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04-26-2017, 01:17 PM (This post was last modified: 04-26-2017 01:18 PM by Rako.)
Post: #5
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
Quote:in a Stephen King novella (The Running Man--yes, the one that would become a Schwarzenegger movie, they just took out the airliner-into-the-skyscraper climax).
http://www.cracked.com/article_18747_5-a...ories.html


Quote:[Image: ccodex_67.jpg]
Stephen King, whose novels on horror and terror invariably go to the top of the bestseller's list. The caption of this photo, published in Newsweek (August 28, 2000, p. 45) reads, "It's good to be King."

[Image: ccodex_68_small.jpg]
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/socio...gica11.htm

Quote:Bizarre Theories About Stephen King
7. His Alcoholism Was A Cover Up For Hiring Ghost Writers

[Image: whiskey-bottle.gif]

King has been sober since his family staged an intervention in the 1980's. "The hungover eye," he said "had a weird ability to find the ugliest things in any given landscape."

Rumours around the 90's that King does have ghostwriters, he then uses alcoholism as a safety net in case he is questioned intensely about any of his writing techniques. He can then relate back to this illness at any time as a defence for not remembering the books he has supposedly written himself.

He mentions that "there's one novel, Cujo, that I barely remember writing at all. I don't say that with pride or shame, only with a vague sense of sorrow and loss. I like that book. I wish I could remember enjoying the good parts as I put them down on the page." He also mentioned in interviews that he cannot remember writing The Tommyknockers either.

Cynics still do believe that he uses ghost writers as their theory is that it's impossible for one author to pen as many books as King does.
http://whatculture.com/books/10-insane-a...ing?page=5

Quote:5. He Steals All His Work

King writes 3-4 hours per day and in his prime would manage 2000 €“ 3000 words a day. Some however believe in the mad theory that the author barely presses a key when it comes to creating his work and instead just steals work from others.
There have been cases against Stephen King and accusations of copyright theft, however to accuse the greatest horror writer of this generation of stealing content is offensive and this was made clear by one judge in particular. Author Chrstine Starobin appeared in court to accuse King of plagiarising her manuscript Blood Eternal; the judge ruled in favour of King and reprimanded Starobin for "engaging in a recurring and vitriolic attack upon the character and abilities of King."

The fact that aspiring film makers can purchase the rights to his short stories for just $1 also adds fuel to the rumour. All he asks is that a completed copy of the film is sent to him. Theorists believe the cheap price for the rights is due to him feeling guilty that the work was never truly his in the first place.
Most of the ghost-writing rumours are from those who are in complete disbelief that an author can write so quickly - especially when you consider that he completed the 304 page novel The Running Man in only ten days. Jealousy is a terrible thing.
http://whatculture.com/books/10-insane-a...ing?page=7
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04-28-2017, 02:52 PM
Post: #6
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
I think he's just a story teller who likes dark themes.

His work changed dramatically after he nearly died when a car mounted the sidewalk and almost killed him.


Which was rather ironic.

[Image: christinepic.jpg]

I'm just trying to figure this shit out like you are.
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04-28-2017, 03:05 PM
Post: #7
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
(04-26-2017 01:17 PM)Rako Wrote:  
Quote:in a Stephen King novella (The Running Man--yes, the one that would become a Schwarzenegger movie, they just took out the airliner-into-the-skyscraper climax).
http://www.cracked.com/article_18747_5-a...ories.html


Quote:[Image: ccodex_67.jpg]
Stephen King, whose novels on horror and terror invariably go to the top of the bestseller's list. The caption of this photo, published in Newsweek (August 28, 2000, p. 45) reads, "It's good to be King."

[Image: ccodex_68_small.jpg]
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/socio...gica11.htm

Quote:Bizarre Theories About Stephen King
7. His Alcoholism Was A Cover Up For Hiring Ghost Writers

[Image: whiskey-bottle.gif]

King has been sober since his family staged an intervention in the 1980's. "The hungover eye," he said "had a weird ability to find the ugliest things in any given landscape."

Rumours around the 90's that King does have ghostwriters, he then uses alcoholism as a safety net in case he is questioned intensely about any of his writing techniques. He can then relate back to this illness at any time as a defence for not remembering the books he has supposedly written himself.

He mentions that "there's one novel, Cujo, that I barely remember writing at all. I don't say that with pride or shame, only with a vague sense of sorrow and loss. I like that book. I wish I could remember enjoying the good parts as I put them down on the page." He also mentioned in interviews that he cannot remember writing The Tommyknockers either.

Cynics still do believe that he uses ghost writers as their theory is that it's impossible for one author to pen as many books as King does.
http://whatculture.com/books/10-insane-a...ing?page=5

Quote:5. He Steals All His Work

King writes 3-4 hours per day and in his prime would manage 2000 €“ 3000 words a day. Some however believe in the mad theory that the author barely presses a key when it comes to creating his work and instead just steals work from others.
There have been cases against Stephen King and accusations of copyright theft, however to accuse the greatest horror writer of this generation of stealing content is offensive and this was made clear by one judge in particular. Author Chrstine Starobin appeared in court to accuse King of plagiarising her manuscript Blood Eternal; the judge ruled in favour of King and reprimanded Starobin for "engaging in a recurring and vitriolic attack upon the character and abilities of King."

The fact that aspiring film makers can purchase the rights to his short stories for just $1 also adds fuel to the rumour. All he asks is that a completed copy of the film is sent to him. Theorists believe the cheap price for the rights is due to him feeling guilty that the work was never truly his in the first place.
Most of the ghost-writing rumours are from those who are in complete disbelief that an author can write so quickly - especially when you consider that he completed the 304 page novel The Running Man in only ten days. Jealousy is a terrible thing.
http://whatculture.com/books/10-insane-a...ing?page=7

all this stuff seems like a stretch.

he probably uses copywriters that add some stuff here and there but he probably does all his own work
him letting filmmakers uses his work is a good gesture and this should be applauded

Those who know, know! Big Grin
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04-28-2017, 04:44 PM (This post was last modified: 04-28-2017 04:48 PM by Rako.)
Post: #8
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
It's just a "coincidence" that Kubrick happened to be the director for the super-trippy Shining after a random director mailed him a dollar?

I guess No, if that wasn't a Short Story. Maybe sometimes he really does sell his movie rights for 1$. I do know that when high-asset sales are made for the price of a dollar, it has a tendency to raise red flags in business practices.
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04-28-2017, 07:13 PM
Post: #9
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
I doubt that he uses ghost writers, his style was consistent throughout the 80's and 90's and was regarded by many as being on another level compared to the work of Koontz and other horror writers. I think that to even suggest that you can get a few unknown writers to produce such work, is a stretch.

His near death experience, and the injuries he sustained when he was hit by the car, seemed to have changed him. He went from horror themed stuff to fantasy themed. The Dark Tower series isn't actually dark, it's just a very different theme to what he was doing prior.
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04-28-2017, 09:34 PM
Post: #10
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
Agree with prof
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04-29-2017, 03:28 PM
Post: #11
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
Quote:Driver who hit Stephen King is found dead
By Toby Harnden in Washington12:00AM BST 27 Sep 2000
THE driver whose van struck and nearly killed the horror writer Stephen King last year has been found dead at his home after telling friends that he could not face another winter.
Bryan Smith, 43, had become increasingly isolated after the accident near North Lovell, Maine, in which King suffered multiple injuries and nearly lost a leg.
The author of Carrie and The Shining had pushed for Mr Smith to be charged with aggravated assault, which could have led to a jail sentence, and mocked him in a New Yorker article as "a character out of one of my own novels". Mr Smith, who had been left disabled by a building site accident, received a suspended sentence and lost his driving licence.
A post mortem examination found no signs of violence. King said yesterday that he was "very sorry to hear of the passing of Bryan Smith". He said: "The death of a 43-year-old man can only be termed untimely."
The author had been criticised for pursuing what some saw as a vendetta against Mr Smith, whose lawyers complained that he could not get a fair trial. Carl Magee, a friend of Mr Smith, said: "I could go out and run over a little kid; it could happen to any of us. All I'm saying is, with an average Joe, none of this would have happened. But Stephen King is on national television, he's moaning and whining."

Mr Smith, who had been taking painkillers for a back injury, was found dead in his caravan home at Freyburg, Maine, on Friday. John Thompson, another friend, said: "Bryan had nothing left. He said to me, 'I'd hate to go through another winter dragging my way up and down the highway in the snow'."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnew...-dead.html
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04-29-2017, 05:02 PM
Post: #12
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
That is fishy, attempted hit on his life imo
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04-29-2017, 10:24 PM
Post: #13
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
(04-29-2017 03:28 PM)Redneck Wrote:  A post mortem examination found no signs of violence. King said yesterday that he was "very sorry to hear of the passing of Bryan Smith". He said: "The death of a 43-year-old man can only be termed untimely."
Untimely but no signs of violence?
What is "untimely" supposed to connotate?
Not a normal death?
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04-29-2017, 10:36 PM
Post: #14
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
With assault, I think you need to show intent.
If there was no intent, then what would the crime be, some kind of negligence?
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04-30-2017, 03:20 AM
Post: #15
RE: So what's the deal with Stephen King?
(04-29-2017 10:24 PM)Rako Wrote:  
(04-29-2017 03:28 PM)Redneck Wrote:  A post mortem examination found no signs of violence. King said yesterday that he was "very sorry to hear of the passing of Bryan Smith". He said: "The death of a 43-year-old man can only be termed untimely."
Untimely but no signs of violence?
What is "untimely" supposed to connotate?
Not a normal death?



It was a strange choice of words.

I'm just trying to figure this shit out like you are.
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