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Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Printable Version

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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - The Diet Butcher - 05-28-2014 01:40 AM

good stuff. he was also in Bodyguards and Assassins where he got kneebarred by Donnie Yen.





fuck, they censored the knee break in this clip Angry


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-28-2014 02:44 PM

(05-24-2014 03:08 PM)The Diet Butcher Wrote:  A faith in humanity restored type of video just popped up on FB




China is a big place. There are lots of altruists there but unfortunately the media always likes to focus on the negatives.


Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-29-2014 12:45 AM

(05-28-2014 01:40 AM)The Diet Butcher Wrote:  good stuff. he was also in Bodyguards and Assassins where he got kneebarred by Donnie Yen.





fuck, they censored the knee break in this clip :@

Thank you got your kind words!

Yeah I knew about B & A but chose to do The Grandmaster first. B&A coming soon


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Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-29-2014 01:43 AM

My last set of GIFs of Cung Le’s appearance in The Grandmaster – this set is a bonus set, isolating for one action, extracted specific frames, etc. unlike the previous 2 GIF seTs where I captured the scene

[Image: TheGrandmaster-TonyLeung-17-FrontKick-400-sg.gif]
[Image: TheGrandmaster-TonyLeung-19-WalkAway-400-sg.gif]

Enjoy 5 more GIFs here:

http://www.stickgrappler.net/2014/05/bonus-gif-set-1-grandmaster-cung-le.html



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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-30-2014 12:50 AM

teh grandmaster started off very srong but ended very weak.

WKW is a visual master but his storytelling is weak.


Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-30-2014 01:19 AM

(05-30-2014 12:50 AM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  teh grandmaster started off very srong but ended very weak.

WKW is a visual master but his storytelling is weak.

His main theme always has been unrequited love and for that The Grandmaster is true to form


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Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-30-2014 01:19 AM

A Better Tomorrow I GIF Set 2 - some of Chow Yun-fat's Gun-Fu – 9, count them 9 GIF’s for your viewing pleasure! Instead of capturing the scene like my previous set, this set features shorter fun GIFs isolating for just Gun-Fu.


[Image: ABetterTomorrow-1st-02a-400-sg.gif]
[Image: ABetterTomorrow-1st-02c-400-sg.gif]
[Image: ABetterTomorrow-1st-03a-400-sg.gif]


Enjoy 6 more GIFs here:

http://www.stickgrappler.net/2014/05/a-better-tomorrow-i-gif-set-2-some-of_29.html



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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-30-2014 01:26 AM

(05-30-2014 01:19 AM)Stickgrappler Wrote:  
(05-30-2014 12:50 AM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  teh grandmaster started off very srong but ended very weak.

WKW is a visual master but his storytelling is weak.

His main theme always has been unrequited love and for that The Grandmaster is true to form


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

yeah, but it's kind of a cheesy theme in today's cultural climate.

it's just not realistic anymore. people are very quick to move on regarding love and other things.

I think he needs to modify his approach towards tackling the subject?

regarding the grandmaster, it just seemed to be disjointed in a lot of ways. the various plot strands did not come together in a coherent way.

In his previous movies like fallen angels or chungking express he did a much better job.

Ashes of time was also another storytelling failure even though visually it was gorgeous. nice soundtrack too.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-30-2014 01:42 AM

Chinese rescue another baby:






RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-30-2014 01:56 AM






RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 05-30-2014 01:58 AM

shanghai can really hurt your feelings if you are materialistic.


Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-30-2014 08:36 AM

(05-30-2014 01:26 AM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  
(05-30-2014 01:19 AM)Stickgrappler Wrote:  
(05-30-2014 12:50 AM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  teh grandmaster started off very srong but ended very weak.

WKW is a visual master but his storytelling is weak.

His main theme always has been unrequited love and for that The Grandmaster is true to form


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

yeah, but it's kind of a cheesy theme in today's cultural climate.

it's just not realistic anymore. people are very quick to move on regarding love and other things.

I think he needs to modify his approach towards tackling the subject?

regarding the grandmaster, it just seemed to be disjointed in a lot of ways. the various plot strands did not come together in a coherent way.

In his previous movies like fallen angels or chungking express he did a much better job.

Ashes of time was also another storytelling failure even though visually it was gorgeous. nice soundtrack too.

Re: TGM - there's rumored to be a four hour cut! He trimmed it down from four hrs to like 130 mins for the "Hong Kong Cut" or "Chinese Cut" - forgot what they called it.

And then Martin Scorsese throws his name on it and WKW further cuts it down to 108 mins for the " American Cut" or is it called " International Cut"?

Given the rumor of the four hour cut, i can understand why it's disjointed. The Baji master aka The Blade was in two fight scenes and probably should've been cut out but he's on the poster so they kept him is my guess. He sldo id on the train with ZZY. WKW should've just stuck with telling Ip Man's story but he also wanted to show how other MA came into HK




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Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Stickgrappler - 05-31-2014 07:10 AM

Eye in the Sky
Directed by Yau Nai-Hoi
Produced by Johnnie To

Starring
Simon Yam Tat Wah
Tony Leung Ka-fai (aka Big Tony)
Kate Tsui
Maggie Siu
Lam Suet

In this 2007 Hong Kong movie, Yam and Tsui play surveillance operatives on the trail of a gang of professional robbers led by Leung. Both Yam and Leung, veteran Hong Kong A-list stars, were great in this. It was Yau’s first directorial effort, working often on scripts for Johnnie To, and what a good movie he directed! Yau Nai-hoi won the Hong Kong Film Award for Best New Director.

Kate Tsui, a former Miss Hong Kong starred in her first movie and she won the Hong Kong Film Award for Best New Actress. She was terrific in this movie. She is a rookie who joins the SU (Surveillance Unit) – their missions are all surveillance/tailing suspects etc. They work as an intricate team tailing suspects, all supervised by Simon Yam.

Big Tony is the mastermind of a gang of professional thieves who knock off jewelry stores. Cold, calculating, smart, and ruthless, he always plans out the heist to the exact second, timing Police response times, etc.

Suspenseful throughout, this police procedural/crime film delivers. There were small touches here and there that really endeared me to the movie like Simon Yam telling a joke to relieve boredom while canvassing an area awaiting the appearance of Lam Suet. Also Lam, great character actor, turned in a solid performance. Additionally, Maggie Siu, a veteran actress, as the foul-mouthed supervisor of the Criminal Intelligence Bureau which the SU is part of, was awesome as well.

NO SPOILER: There were 2 points in the movie that were clichéd … the first point in the movie, I think should’ve been done the other way, but it was good that it went the way it did. The 2nd point was cliché all the way and was satisfying.

I generally recommend any Johnnie To directed movie as well as any movie from his production company, Milkway Image. Even though To didn’t direct Eye in the Sky, any Milkway Image movie will have him overseeing.

I highly recommend this movie.


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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 06-01-2014 02:03 PM

Complaints about Chinese buyers inflating house prices miss the fact that foreign residential property investment encourages new housing construction.

It’s rare to see the Left and the Right reaching consensus, but it appears nothing can pull Australians together as much as the threat posed by Chinese property buyers.

Today Paul “Magic Water” Sheehan offered his take on the impact of Chinese buyers on the Sydney residential property market. He warned darkly in today’s Sydney Morning Herald:

“The growth of the Chinese middle class has been so explosive, and on such a scale, that it has the capacity to affect Australia in ways that will need to be controlled if some trends continue to accelerate. Notably home buying.”

Sheehan, it seems, is was most worried about young people:

“First-time buyers, young buyers, are now caught in a pincer movement between superannuation and Chinese investment.”

A pincer movement. Wow. But Sheehan was merely echoing Clive Hamilton, who recently wrote an article for The Guardian originally headlined “Wealthy Chinese buyers are making Sydney’s housing problem worse”. Hamilton’s piece commenced:

“Every weekend in Sydney, young Australian couples are turning up at auctions excited at the prospect of finally owning their own home, only to find that other bidders are wealthy foreign buyers with money to burn.”

“Cash pouring in from China” was responsible, Hamilton claimed — a “flood of unregulated investment”. It touched on the same themes as Sheehan’s piece later would: young people priced out of the market, official indifference, how Hong Kong doesn’t let the same thing happen.

But the headline on Hamilton’s piece was changed to “Foreign demand is making Sydney’s housing problem worse” after an outcry from readers. The Guardian offered an apologia almost as long as the article itself admitting a number of problems with Hamilton’s article, although “the author stands by his opinion”.

Hamilton and Sheehan aren’t the only ones, though. This “flood” of unregulated money from China is becoming a staple of media real estate coverage, especially in Fairfax papers, which have carried articles about the Chinese property “splurge” as real estate prices, especially in Sydney, have soared.

Well, let’s try some facts, courtesy of the Foreign Investment Review Board’s 2012-13 annual report, which has data on who is buying residential property. Total foreign investment in residential property in Australia fell in 2012-13, from $19.7 billion to $17.2 billion. That was because of a fall in “off-the-plan” purchases; purchases of existing dwelling stock increased to $5.4 billion (it had fallen in 2011-12), and purchases of vacant land had more than doubled to $1.4 billion. Victoria and New South Wales dominate as destinations for foreign investment in residential property, garnering around $5.8 billion and $5.5 billion respectively.

But importantly, foreign residential real estate investment skews toward new dwelling construction: in 2012-13, despite the fall-off in off-the-plan purchasing, $8.64 billion in foreign investment was for new dwellings, with a further $2 billion for other development, while investment in existing dwellings was $6.4 billion. The predominance of new dwelling investment in foreign residential investment is dramatically at odds with the rest of the market, where new dwelling investment is a fraction of housing finance.

Where does the investment come from? Residential property investment from China is substantial. Chinese buyers are the biggest foreign real estate investors: in 2012-13 they purchased just under $6 billion in real estate — but that includes commercial real estate, which is twice as large a target for foreign investment as residential real estate. But Canada and the United States aren’t far behind the Chinese; Canadians invested just under $5 billion in Australian real estate, and Americans $4.4 billion. Singapore was next with $2 billion, then Malaysia with $1.6 billion; in between were the British, on $1.7 billion.

So, even arbitrarily and xenophobically combining all Chinese, Singaporean, Hong Kong and Malaysian real estate investment under a “Chinese” stereotype means “China” is only just ahead of North American real estate investment (and again, remember that these figures include commercial real estate). And if you lump in the Brits and the Kiwis, investment from “white” foreigners exceeds that from “Chinese” foreigners.

Read many stories about white people driving up Sydney real estate prices? Of course not. Hard to get a good anecdote about white people showing up to an auction and bidding successfully for a property. “Chinese” buyers, even if their families have lived in Australia for a century, are easier to spot and complain about.

But let’s assume that all “Chinese” property investment — just over $10 billion of it in 2012-13 — was for residential property, which we know isn’t true. How much of an impact does that have? The total value of housing finance commitments (which isn’t all housing purchases anyway) was $264 billion in 2012-13, so our “Chinese” stereotype is investing less than 4%.

And even if you think 4% is too high and is placing too much pressure on prices, ask sellers in Sydney and Melbourne what they think of foreign residential buyers. Chances are they’re perfectly happy to be getting higher prices.

There are legitimate grounds for concern about housing affordability, but they’ve got little to do foreign property buyers, whether Chinese, Canadian or any other ethnicity. They’re related to land supply, planning laws, development approval processes, NIMBYism, the balance between local councils and developers financing the necessary infrastructure for new housing, and tax expenditures that encourage investment in existing housing stock. The best way to improve housing affordability — assuming that’s what you really want to do, given ultimately that will reduce the rise in value of the key asset of most voters — is to create incentives for investment in building new housing stock.

And oddly enough, at the moment it’s foreign investors who are doing that, not the rest of us.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 06-01-2014 02:10 PM

Quote:“The growth of the Chinese middle class has been so explosive, and on such a scale, that it has the capacity to affect Australia in ways that will need to be controlled if some trends continue to accelerate. Notably home buying.”

this is hilarious. people who buy million dollar homes with cash are labeled "middle class" by the western press.

since when is that middle class.

that's called WEALTHY