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Re: RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Hellfire Awaits - 10-10-2013 07:37 AM

(10-10-2013 06:11 AM)Roland Bates Wrote:  From the Menzies article linked above:

"Most scientists believe man first widely populated the Western Hemisphere 13,000 to 16,500 years ago.

The almost universally-held theory among academics is that man came to the New World by crossing the Bering Strait land-bridge between Asia and North America.

'The more I thought about the Bering Strait theory of populating the Americas, the more ridiculous it became,' Mr Menzies writes about his investigation of the topic.

Mr Menzies says the idea that man was able to cross the Pacific Ocean around 40,000 BC isn't nearly as dramatic as it seems.

'If you just go out in a plastic bath tub, the currents will just carry you there,' he told MailOnline. 'They just came with the current, it’s as simple as that.'"


I think Menzies got carried away, to say the least. The evidence for the Bering Strait theory is overwhelming. Menzies could have just said that he thought some Chinese (or other Asian) sailors might have made it to America, but I don't see any evidence that they returned or set up colonies. If they returned, they almost certainly would have brought back American species of plants, etc.

Gee, what is easier. Crossing a land bridge a few hundred km wide, or swimming across an ocean HALF the circumference of the world.

With the exception of Solutrean man, who arrived from the east, it's not like there aren't any carbon dated skeletons in north America before the past 12,000 years.

Menzies is a retard.



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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 11-09-2013 10:42 AM

A couple updates.

http://www.theatlantic.com/china/archive/2013/11/why-chinese-people-buy-so-many-homes-in-palo-alto/281234/

"The rise of the Chinese consumer on the global stage has had a tremendous effect on world markets, shaking up everything from the price of milk powder to impressionist paintings. Now, the impact is being felt all the way in Palo Alto, the Silicon Valley town next to Stanford University.

Over the past two years, Chinese buyers have been snapping up property in the city, driving up prices and possibly contributing to an emerging bubble. Chinese nationals have tripled their share of home purchases in Palo Alto since 2011, now accounting for around 15 percent of transactions in the city according to Ken Deleon, founder of Deleon Realty, a local firm that has invested heavily in catering to Chinese buyers.

“If we have seven offers for a home here, three of them will be Mainland Chinese buyers with all cash,” Kim Heng, the Chinese-born head of Asian outreach at Deleon Realty, guessed. “We’ve never seen so much money in all the years we’ve been in the real estate business.”

“I am so shocked at the amount of money these people have,” Bowling remarked. “To me $3 million is a lot of money, but to them it’s almost like pocket change. It just doesn’t put any kind of financial burden on them.”

[Image: c290be33c.jpg]

A brochure from Deleon Realty showing the Great Wall of China, the Golden Gate Bridge, and Stanford University's Hoover Tower.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 11-09-2013 10:50 AM

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/07/us-china-education-idUSBRE9A60DR20131107


"Chinese students form the largest overseas group at U.S. universities and their numbers are rising as families spend a fortune in the quest for an American education to pry open the door to career and social success.

For some parents, overseas education is also seen as a way to avoid China's fiercely competitive national college entrance exam known as the "gaokao", which is taken by millions of teenagers who see it as a make-or-break way to get ahead.

"We don't know if it's right or wrong," said Zhao, a mother from the capital, Beijing, who wanted to be identified only by her surname. "We just feel it's better to get an education in the United States than in China."

The stress to get into university in China is severe but tighter job prospects for hordes of graduates are also causing anxiety as the world's second-largest economy slows.

Nearly 7 million Chinese graduated from university this year - a new record and a jump of 190,000 from last year. This has stepped up employment pressure, education authorities say.

To pursue his dream of going to a U.S. university, Li Shiyuan, 17, quit high school in May.

His parents had given him three options - stay in his home province of Shandong, where the college entrance exams are very competitive, move to Tianjin, which has one of China's highest acceptance rates for key universities, or study abroad.

He began in Beijing, by attending three courses to train for tests required by U.S. universities, including the SAT and the TOEFL English-language test.

This month, he sat the SAT exam for the second time in an effort to better his previous score and he plans to return to the Hong Kong test center in December.

"It's much better than in high school, where teachers put too much pressure on us," Li said.

His training for the exams has cost 100,000 yuan ($16,400), almost five times the annual disposable income of the average Chinese city-dweller.

"As long as the family can afford it, I would like my child to go abroad for university to learn some real stuff," said lawyer Li Xuezong, who accompanied his son to Hong Kong.

Nearly 200,000 Chinese students were at U.S. universities in the 2011/12 academic year, almost double the number from India, the second-largest group of overseas students, the U.S.-based Institute of International Education says.

While most Chinese study at graduate level, the 2011/12 academic year saw a surge of nearly a third in undergraduates from China, to about 75,000, institute data shows.

SATs are available only at some international schools in China, where fees are out of reach for most families. Hong Kong holds six SAT sessions a year.

AN OPPORTUNITY - FOR THE WEALTHY

Li Xuezong was one of hundreds of parents waiting patiently outside at Hong Kong's AsiaWorld-Expo, the city's biggest test center, where his son was among the 7,000 exam candidates.

Situated conveniently next to the airport, AsiaWorld-Expo hosts about 60,000 SAT takers a year, more than 90 percent of them from mainland China, Chief Executive Allen Ha said.

Many students take the test more than once.

"Because our examination-oriented system doesn't have many criteria to judge student performance, they focus on exams," said Zong Wa, an official of the government-linked China Education Association for International Exchange.

Studying abroad is an option mainly for the rich. Families typically save at least 1 million yuan ($164,000) for four years of college in America, but about 12 percent of China's 1.35 billion people still live on less than $1.25 a day.

Zong said as many as 450,000 Chinese would go overseas for education this year, with the U.S. the most popular destination."


Re: RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Hellfire Awaits - 11-09-2013 11:42 AM

(11-09-2013 10:50 AM)Roland Bates Wrote:  http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/07/us-china-education-idUSBRE9A60DR20131107


"Chinese students form the largest overseas group at U.S. universities and their numbers are rising as families spend a fortune in the quest for an American education to pry open the door to career and social success.

For some parents, overseas education is also seen as a way to avoid China's fiercely competitive national college entrance exam known as the "gaokao", which is taken by millions of teenagers who see it as a make-or-break way to get ahead.

"We don't know if it's right or wrong," said Zhao, a mother from the capital, Beijing, who wanted to be identified only by her surname. "We just feel it's better to get an education in the United States than in China."

The stress to get into university in China is severe but tighter job prospects for hordes of graduates are also causing anxiety as the world's second-largest economy slows.

Nearly 7 million Chinese graduated from university this year - a new record and a jump of 190,000 from last year. This has stepped up employment pressure, education authorities say.

To pursue his dream of going to a U.S. university, Li Shiyuan, 17, quit high school in May.

His parents had given him three options - stay in his home province of Shandong, where the college entrance exams are very competitive, move to Tianjin, which has one of China's highest acceptance rates for key universities, or study abroad.

He began in Beijing, by attending three courses to train for tests required by U.S. universities, including the SAT and the TOEFL English-language test.

This month, he sat the SAT exam for the second time in an effort to better his previous score and he plans to return to the Hong Kong test center in December.

"It's much better than in high school, where teachers put too much pressure on us," Li said.

His training for the exams has cost 100,000 yuan ($16,400), almost five times the annual disposable income of the average Chinese city-dweller.

"As long as the family can afford it, I would like my child to go abroad for university to learn some real stuff," said lawyer Li Xuezong, who accompanied his son to Hong Kong.

Nearly 200,000 Chinese students were at U.S. universities in the 2011/12 academic year, almost double the number from India, the second-largest group of overseas students, the U.S.-based Institute of International Education says.

While most Chinese study at graduate level, the 2011/12 academic year saw a surge of nearly a third in undergraduates from China, to about 75,000, institute data shows.

SATs are available only at some international schools in China, where fees are out of reach for most families. Hong Kong holds six SAT sessions a year.

AN OPPORTUNITY - FOR THE WEALTHY

Li Xuezong was one of hundreds of parents waiting patiently outside at Hong Kong's AsiaWorld-Expo, the city's biggest test center, where his son was among the 7,000 exam candidates.

Situated conveniently next to the airport, AsiaWorld-Expo hosts about 60,000 SAT takers a year, more than 90 percent of them from mainland China, Chief Executive Allen Ha said.

Many students take the test more than once.

"Because our examination-oriented system doesn't have many criteria to judge student performance, they focus on exams," said Zong Wa, an official of the government-linked China Education Association for International Exchange.

Studying abroad is an option mainly for the rich. Families typically save at least 1 million yuan ($164,000) for four years of college in America, but about 12 percent of China's 1.35 billion people still live on less than $1.25 a day.

Zong said as many as 450,000 Chinese would go overseas for education this year, with the U.S. the most popular destination."

With the exception of some grad students, the great majority of these retards are third or fourth rate students whose parents happen to have a lot of money. China has an official policy prohibiting brain drain of talented students to the US. Nobody who gets into beida or jiaotong will even consider slumming it at a state university in Ohio.

They are a fucking disgrace and worst of all they make ALL Asians look bad with their behavior... if you can't be sociable or polite, at least try not to look fugly looking.




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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Hellfire Awaits - 11-09-2013 11:44 AM

Also China's one child policy + h savings rate ensures that a lot of middle class families have a ton of disposable cash on hand. Paying $40k per year on tuition is no object for them.



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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 11-09-2013 03:35 PM

(11-09-2013 11:42 AM)Hellfire Awaits Wrote:  
(11-09-2013 10:50 AM)Roland Bates Wrote:  http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/07/us-china-education-idUSBRE9A60DR20131107


"Chinese students form the largest overseas group at U.S. universities and their numbers are rising as families spend a fortune in the quest for an American education to pry open the door to career and social success.

For some parents, overseas education is also seen as a way to avoid China's fiercely competitive national college entrance exam known as the "gaokao", which is taken by millions of teenagers who see it as a make-or-break way to get ahead.

"We don't know if it's right or wrong," said Zhao, a mother from the capital, Beijing, who wanted to be identified only by her surname. "We just feel it's better to get an education in the United States than in China."

The stress to get into university in China is severe but tighter job prospects for hordes of graduates are also causing anxiety as the world's second-largest economy slows.

Nearly 7 million Chinese graduated from university this year - a new record and a jump of 190,000 from last year. This has stepped up employment pressure, education authorities say.

To pursue his dream of going to a U.S. university, Li Shiyuan, 17, quit high school in May.

His parents had given him three options - stay in his home province of Shandong, where the college entrance exams are very competitive, move to Tianjin, which has one of China's highest acceptance rates for key universities, or study abroad.

He began in Beijing, by attending three courses to train for tests required by U.S. universities, including the SAT and the TOEFL English-language test.

This month, he sat the SAT exam for the second time in an effort to better his previous score and he plans to return to the Hong Kong test center in December.

"It's much better than in high school, where teachers put too much pressure on us," Li said.

His training for the exams has cost 100,000 yuan ($16,400), almost five times the annual disposable income of the average Chinese city-dweller.

"As long as the family can afford it, I would like my child to go abroad for university to learn some real stuff," said lawyer Li Xuezong, who accompanied his son to Hong Kong.

Nearly 200,000 Chinese students were at U.S. universities in the 2011/12 academic year, almost double the number from India, the second-largest group of overseas students, the U.S.-based Institute of International Education says.

While most Chinese study at graduate level, the 2011/12 academic year saw a surge of nearly a third in undergraduates from China, to about 75,000, institute data shows.

SATs are available only at some international schools in China, where fees are out of reach for most families. Hong Kong holds six SAT sessions a year.

AN OPPORTUNITY - FOR THE WEALTHY

Li Xuezong was one of hundreds of parents waiting patiently outside at Hong Kong's AsiaWorld-Expo, the city's biggest test center, where his son was among the 7,000 exam candidates.

Situated conveniently next to the airport, AsiaWorld-Expo hosts about 60,000 SAT takers a year, more than 90 percent of them from mainland China, Chief Executive Allen Ha said.

Many students take the test more than once.

"Because our examination-oriented system doesn't have many criteria to judge student performance, they focus on exams," said Zong Wa, an official of the government-linked China Education Association for International Exchange.

Studying abroad is an option mainly for the rich. Families typically save at least 1 million yuan ($164,000) for four years of college in America, but about 12 percent of China's 1.35 billion people still live on less than $1.25 a day.

Zong said as many as 450,000 Chinese would go overseas for education this year, with the U.S. the most popular destination."

With the exception of some grad students, the great majority of these retards are third or fourth rate students whose parents happen to have a lot of money. China has an official policy prohibiting brain drain of talented students to the US. Nobody who gets into beida or jiaotong will even consider slumming it at a state university in Ohio.

They are a fucking disgrace and worst of all they make ALL Asians look bad with their behavior... if you can't be sociable or polite, at least try not to look fugly looking.




Sent from my Samsuck Clone S3 using Crapatalk

correct.

the correct path for truly elite students is this

bachelors at elite china institution like tsinghua or peking.. then MASTERS/PHD overseas.

those who go to the US/abroad for bachelors are usually 3rd rate students


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 12-05-2013 10:26 AM

Interesting game theory discussion of China and gold.

http://www.tfmetalsreport.com/blog/5290/risk-and-reward-chinas-golden-hammer

"The bottom line is that China holds all the cards now: they are the largest export economy in the world, have the biggest concentration of manufacturing infrastructure and expertise in the world, and they now possess an enormous gold reserve (augmented by the largest gold mining output of any nation in the world, set to exceed a whopping 400 tons this year alone). They truly possess a Golden Hammer, and with one blow they could choose to establish themselves as the new economic Hegemon of the 21st century. They likely have the ability to do this right now, as we speak.

So why don’t they do it?

Aside from the obvious fact that the longer they wait the more powerful their position becomes, I suspect there are two interrelated reasons. One is the still formidable power of the US military (and particularly the nuclear weapons arsenal), and two is the irascible and “quick to anger” nature of the US public. The last thing China wants is for a hard crash to engulf the US economy and have a hot-tempered US public placing the blame squarely on China. Things could get out of control quickly, and this would not be in their long-term interests. In order for China to swing their Golden Hammer, it is imperative for them to be certain that the US public will be pointing fingers at Washington, not Beijing. They simply cannot afford to be the scapegoat for the inevitable destruction of the current US standard of living and the seething anger this will inevitably engender.

So it seems the most logical strategy for China is to 1. Quietly move pieces around the board, putting agreements, infrastructure, and resources in place to be ready to assert their position as Hegemon when the time is right, and 2. Wait patiently for a meltdown (of banks, markets, or the US economy as a whole) that will give them the cover to THEN make their big move without fear of provoking the US public and therefore risking a destructive military confrontation.

In the meantime, they continue to flex their geopolitical muscles in various places, such as unilaterally proclaiming a huge “no-fly without our permission” zone over international waters. They continue to sign trade agreements and have second-tier functionaries make public pronouncements about the weakness of the US dollar or about no longer accumulating US dollar currency reserves. They may even quietly work to hasten the process of western fiat crisis a bit in various markets, possibly using those 1.3 trillion dollars in treasuries, once they feel more confident of their position.

Regardless, what will really get my attention will be what China does in the aftermath of the next 2008-style western financial crisis. My suspicion is that they will wait until the self-inflicted wounds of the west finally result in a debacle the politicians and central planners cannot control or hide from the public. In the aftermath of such a crisis, they will wait until US public attention (and blame) is squarely directed at Washington, then they will swing their Golden Hammer."


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 12-05-2013 10:38 AM

Anti-western post going viral in China.

http://www.businessinsider.com/anti-western-post-going-viral-in-china-2013-12#ixzz2mQqTCLwl

"An anonymous anti-Western post called 'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' is blowing up on Chinese blogs and social media sites like Weibo, reports the South China Morning Post.

State media is calling it a 'spontaneous expression of patriotism,' says the report.

'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' warns China's citizens to keep an eye out for Western powers that wish to destabilize the nation and “take advantage of social instability to harm Chinese people”.

“China would be in chaos if it lost the leadership of the CCP and this would be a catastrophe for the 1.3 billion Chinese people,” the post says.

This comes amid tensions between the U.S., Japan, South Korea, and China over air space over the South China Sea. Moreover, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron arrived in Beijing yesterday — a Bloomberg reporter was barred from a presser with Cameron and Premier Li Keqiang — and U.S. Vice President Joe Biden is about to arrive for a state visit as well.

In the post, the United States is singled out as “an initiator of plots” to foment chaos.

See also:

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1371799/patriotic-post-calling-chinese-be-guard-against-western-anti-china-powers


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 01-05-2014 08:29 AM

http://www.tessgerritsen.com/blog/the-city-of-eternal-spring/

"During this holiday season, I’ve been thinking about my Mom. About all the things she’s missed seeing since she passed away last year, most of all the birth of our first grandchild. How she would have adored little Levina! This past April, the Wall Street Journal published my article about bringing my mother’s ashes back to China. I wanted to share it with you.

My mother flew home to China in checked baggage.

Worried that TSA would confiscate her cremated remains from my carry-on, I pack the urn with her ashes into a suitcase filled with gifts for my Chinese relatives and entrust her mortal remains to United Airlines. Mom and I often talked about the trip we’d someday take together to the “city of eternal spring” where she was born. In Kunming, she said, the fruits are sweeter, the mountains are like Chinese paintings, and the weather is always perfect. I promised that I would go with her when my life was less hectic, but the years inexorably slipped past and suddenly, it was too late. As she lay dying, I made that promise one last time. Yes, Mom. We’ll go to China.

The Kunming I encounter is nothing like the quaint town my mother described. Instead I find an eight-lane freeway and a skyline studded with highrises. I also discover dozens of excited relatives I’ve never met before, waiting to embrace me and my American family as we walk out of baggage claim. Both my parents were Chinese, but I can’t understand a word these relatives are saying. It’s my half-Caucasian son Adam who translates for me. Adam has passionately embraced his Chinese roots and he easily switches between English and Mandarin while I can only nod and smile as I berate myself for never learning Chinese. Growing up in California, I was so determined to be American that I refused to attend Chinese language school, and this is the sorry result. I’m just another clueless foreigner, humbled by my ignorance.

On the day of the funeral, the relatives drive us out of the city in a caravan of cars, and we arrive at a neighborhood of dirt roads and crumbling buildings. I’m bewildered when someone hands me a black umbrella. Adam explains that we’re bringing Popo’s ashes to visit her parents, but she must make the journey in shadow. As Adam carries the urn, I hold up the umbrella to shade my mother. We climb a half mile up a dirt track, past stray dogs and chickens, and wade into a cornfield. Unprepared for this hike, I slip and slide in my sandals, and my feet are coated in mud by the time we arrive at my grandparents’ tomb.

The Chinese relatives reach into the many bags they’ve carried up the hill, pull out gardening gloves and hedgeclippers to clear away the weeds, and set my mother beside the tomb so that she can visit. They burn incense, plant colorful paper flags to ward away evil spirits, and lay out fruits and cakes and cookies for the dead to enjoy. I’m startled to see them also place two cigarettes beside my mother’s urn. Her smoking was a habit I long deplored, and I almost blurt out: “Take those away, they’re bad for her!” I imagine my mother’s spirit merrily puffing away in the afterlife.

After the visit, we carry my mother’s urn back down the hill. Another hour’s drive takes us into cool and forested mountains, to a serene Buddhist mausoleum where her ashes will be entombed. The relatives cheerfully point out all the niches of deceased friends and family, as if pointing out the homes of the living. In China, the dead are not forgotten.

Buddhist monks lead the ceremony, and although I claim no religion, I find myself dutifully bowing and chanting words that I do not understand. It is my brother’s duty to clean our mother’s eternal home, so he wipes down the niche and places the urn inside.

It is my duty, as firstborn, to close the niche and lock it.

I hesitate, my hand caressing my mother’s urn. I think of her turbulent journey to this place. How she escaped war-torn China, leaving behind everyone she knew and loved, and never again saw her parents. How she struggled as an immigrant in America, endured an unhappy marriage to my father, and nursed a lifetime of regrets. Now here she is, back where she was born. Home at last.

I am sobbing as I lock the niche and shut her away forever.

There is one final ritual to perform. Before you leave a cemetery, someone must call out your name and say: “We are going home.” You must answer: “Yes, I am going home now,” so the spirits know you are departing the place of death. The relatives queue up, waiting for their names to be called, and one by one they leave.

At last it is my turn. My son calls out my name and says: “We’re going home.”

But it is to my mother I speak when I answer: “I am going home now.”

To my own home, in America."


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 01-05-2014 08:47 AM

nice article.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - The Diet Butcher - 01-09-2014 11:20 PM

RIP Sir Run Run Shaw

Quote:(Reuters) - Hong Kong media mogul Sir Run Run Shaw, who created an empire in Asia spanning movies to television, died on Tuesday at the age of 106, his company said.

Shaw died peacefully at his home in Hong Kong, surrounded by his family, his company, Television Broadcasts Limited (TVB), said in a statement.

One of Hong Kong cinema's defining figures, Shaw popularized Chinese kung fu films in the West and helped turn the former British colony into a "Hollywood East" over an 80-year career.

Quote:The Shaw studio produced about a thousand titles, including melodramas, historical epics and kung fu classics like "The One-armed Swordsman" - helping to redefine genres and lure new cinema-goers not only in Hong Kong and Asia, but in the West.

Shaw also invested in a number of co-productions, most notably the Ridley Scott classic, "Blade Runner", starring Harrison Ford, in 1982.

The studio also pioneered so-called "Wu Xia" or sword-play genre films - which had frenetic fight scenes with mixed weapons.

Quote:While Shaw was famed for his business acumen and nose for spotting and grooming new talent, he famously turned away a brash, young actor who came to see him in the 1960s.

That spurned man was Bruce Lee, who later teamed up with Raymond Chow, a former Shaw deputy-turned-rival, to make "The Big Boss" in 1971, propelling him to stardom.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/07/us-hongkong-shaw-idUSBREA0604B20140107


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 01-09-2014 11:25 PM

wow 106 years old.

RIP!


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - DonJohnson - 01-10-2014 06:12 AM

dude is worth 4 billion. wow.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 01-10-2014 02:13 PM

(12-05-2013 10:38 AM)Roland Bates Wrote:  Anti-western post going viral in China.

http://www.businessinsider.com/anti-western-post-going-viral-in-china-2013-12#ixzz2mQqTCLwl

"An anonymous anti-Western post called 'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' is blowing up on Chinese blogs and social media sites like Weibo, reports the South China Morning Post.

State media is calling it a 'spontaneous expression of patriotism,' says the report.

'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' warns China's citizens to keep an eye out for Western powers that wish to destabilize the nation and “take advantage of social instability to harm Chinese people”.

“China would be in chaos if it lost the leadership of the CCP and this would be a catastrophe for the 1.3 billion Chinese people,” the post says.

This comes amid tensions between the U.S., Japan, South Korea, and China over air space over the South China Sea. Moreover, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron arrived in Beijing yesterday — a Bloomberg reporter was barred from a presser with Cameron and Premier Li Keqiang — and U.S. Vice President Joe Biden is about to arrive for a state visit as well.

In the post, the United States is singled out as “an initiator of plots” to foment chaos.

See also:

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1371799/patriotic-post-calling-chinese-be-guard-against-western-anti-china-powers

ordo ab chao.

NWO is in big trouble.. people know their schemes.

what will they do?!?!?!?!


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - GMB13 - 01-10-2014 08:09 PM

(01-10-2014 02:13 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  
(12-05-2013 10:38 AM)Roland Bates Wrote:  Anti-western post going viral in China.

http://www.businessinsider.com/anti-western-post-going-viral-in-china-2013-12#ixzz2mQqTCLwl

"An anonymous anti-Western post called 'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' is blowing up on Chinese blogs and social media sites like Weibo, reports the South China Morning Post.

State media is calling it a 'spontaneous expression of patriotism,' says the report.

'You're Nothing Without The Motherland' warns China's citizens to keep an eye out for Western powers that wish to destabilize the nation and “take advantage of social instability to harm Chinese people”.

“China would be in chaos if it lost the leadership of the CCP and this would be a catastrophe for the 1.3 billion Chinese people,” the post says.

This comes amid tensions between the U.S., Japan, South Korea, and China over air space over the South China Sea. Moreover, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron arrived in Beijing yesterday — a Bloomberg reporter was barred from a presser with Cameron and Premier Li Keqiang — and U.S. Vice President Joe Biden is about to arrive for a state visit as well.

In the post, the United States is singled out as “an initiator of plots” to foment chaos.

See also:

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1371799/patriotic-post-calling-chinese-be-guard-against-western-anti-china-powers

ordo ab chao.

NWO is in big trouble.. people know their schemes.

what will they do?!?!?!?!

I predict they will try to outlast current leadership.