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Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Printable Version

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RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 09-30-2013 09:08 AM

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/09/do-you-really-want-to-bet-against-china/

"The book Asia Rising was a prescient 1995 forecast of East and South Asia’s continuing rise to economic power, written by the Economist’s first Asia editor, Jim Rohwer. It is also mostly forgotten because, two years after its publication, East Asia fell into a deep financial and economic crisis that seemed to discredit the thesis. And after that, when China and India’s spectacular growth in the first decade of the new millennium proved Rohwer right in spades, he wasn’t around to say I told you so because he’d died (in a sailing accident) in 2001.

I knew Rohwer slightly, and I thought of him a lot last week during my first visit to Shanghai, a city that played a central role in his book. He had forecast that it would be the epicenter of the Asian boom, with 27 million inhabitants by 2020 and a place alongside New York and London as one of the world’s top three financial capitals. Rohwer — at the time a resident of Hong Kong — also predicted that he’d be living there, “in a district … that in imperial days was known as the French Concession.”

Obviously, and sadly, that last prediction can’t come true. But one night last week I found myself sitting in the garden of a sturdy old house in the lovely, leafy neighborhood that is again known as the French Concession, drinking excellent wine poured by the China-born executive at a U.S. company who lives there, and concluding that Rohwer really had been on to something. Shanghai stands a good chance of meeting or surpassing his population prediction — it’s already at close to 24 million. It’s not yet quite the financial center Rohwer envisioned, because China so far hasn’t been willing to take the plunge into full, unfettered participation in global financial markets (although a new free-trade zone in Shanghai amounts to a major dipping of toes in the water). It does have the feel of a soon-to-be-inescapable global metropolis, the kind of vibrant, affluent, stylish, bold place that will be setting trends and shaping the world economy for decades to come.

Am I utterly confident in that prediction after four days in Shanghai and just 10 total in China? (I also visited Beijing, where I spent most of my time stuck in traffic, and the port city of Dalian, where I spent most of my time in this crazy-looking new conference center.) No, I’m not, and the superficial impressions of short-term visitors to China should of course be taken with many grains of salt.

But a visit to China, or at least to a few of the big, booming cities on or near its coast, cannot help but reinforce the view that it is the inevitabilists like Rohwer who have gotten Asia in general and China in particular right, while the doubters have gotten things wrong again and again and again over the past couple of decades. Nothing truly is inevitable in this world, and China now faces huge pollution problems, dwindling resources, an aging workforce, and a harder road to economic progress with the potential gains from cheap-labor-driven export growth mostly exploited — not to mention the potential for conflict between a populace growing accustomed to economic freedom and at least partial freedom of expression and a ruling political party determined to stay in control. No country has risen to economic greatness without crises and backward steps along the way. But China’s forward momentum is remarkable, and it is so huge and so far along the road to joining the world’s wealthy nations that from now on its crises and backward steps will likely be ours, too.

A core prediction of Rohwer’s 1995 book was that by 2020 the center of global economic gravity would have shifted from the mid-Atlantic to somewhere in or near Asia — with Asia’s economy bigger than those of Europe and the Americas combined. With only six years to go and Asia still quite a few trillions of GDP dollars behind, that seems like a stretch. But the relative change in fortunes has nonetheless been dramatic, and betting against Rohwer on Asia has generally been a bad idea. If only he were around to collect.

One other superficial impression from my China visit: I’ve long been partial to the argument that India possesses a long-run advantage over China because while its hard infrastructure of highways and railroads and airports and power grids is clearly inferior, its soft infrastructure of laws and politics and a free press is vastly superior to China’s. But China’s physical infrastructure just keeps getting more impressive. (Fun fact, from a fascinating article by Keith Bradsher in Tuesday’s New York Times: “China’s high-speed rail network will handle more passengers by early next year than the 54 million people a month who board domestic flights in the United States.”) And over the past decade, with the rise of social media and an independent business media and the continuing development of its legal system, China has made real progress on the soft stuff—possibly as much as India has in building airports and subways and surely more than India has in improving its electrical grid."


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-01-2013 10:12 PM

(08-03-2013 02:49 AM)The Diet Butcher Wrote:  Btw, Chrissie Chau is Chiuchow. Big Grin

(07-04-2013 07:08 AM)Winnson Wrote:  I really like that Hong Kong doesn't take entertainment very seriously.

In the US, it's like one of the controlling superpowers, and that's fucked.

Enjoy some Chrissie Chau

[Image: chrissie_01.jpg]

[Image: chrissie_chau1.jpg]

[Image: chrissie_02.jpg]

[Image: 5600264-chrissie-chau-11-446x600.jpg]

[Image: 4669196562_510880e30d_z.jpg]

[Image: www.eroglamour.com-11-chrissie-chau.jpg]

[Image: Chrissie-Chau-2.jpg]
When I saw her first poster up in Hong Kong, I stood in front of it for 5 full minutes, just admiring the female form.

Built Ford tough! Built!


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-01-2013 10:14 PM

Joey Yung used to be my go to Hong Kong babe, and I would punch anybody in the face that didn't think she was hot.

Now she's just a plastic surgery disaster because not enough people thought she was hot apparently, and that's a goddam shame.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 10-01-2013 10:39 PM

[Image: joey_yung.jpg]


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 10-01-2013 10:48 PM

^ that's WHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACK


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - The Diet Butcher - 10-02-2013 03:03 AM

UFC Macau hapa ring girl Jessica C.

[Image: 11ee5p3.jpg]


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-02-2013 03:26 AM

(10-01-2013 10:39 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote:  [Image: joey_yung.jpg]

Before plastic surgery, she was the hottest Chinese woman alive.

Apparently I was the only one who thought that, so she went under the knife numerous times.

Sad panda

[Image: Joey%20Yung.jpg]

She used to be gorgeous.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-02-2013 03:27 AM

I made a deal with my wife years ago.

If I could hook up Joey Yung, fair enough.

If she could hook up Andy Lau, fair enough.

Damn shame that never happened for either of us....Yet....


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 10-02-2013 04:19 AM

Rumor has it that Andy Lau is gay.. you may be in luck!


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-02-2013 04:36 AM

Andy Lau might be gay, but that doesn't make him any less cool. Check this out.

At a concert in Chengdu, a fan brought him flowers, then started getting stomped by security because he broke the barrier.

Lau Dut Wah jumped right into the fray and broke that shit up with a quickness. Hero.





I admire that my wife wants to bang such cool peeps Tongue


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - EVILYOSHIDA - 10-02-2013 04:39 AM

^ wow.

Upgraded to Bi-Curious LOL


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Winnson - 10-02-2013 04:45 AM

LOL, I told my wife a couple of times if she could score him I just might lick his ass while he was banging her, no homo.

She completely understood.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Som-Pong - 10-02-2013 12:51 PM

My Asian is rising.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - The Diet Butcher - 10-02-2013 02:41 PM

(10-02-2013 04:36 AM)Winnson Wrote:  Andy Lau might be gay, but that doesn't make him any less cool. Check this out.

At a concert in Chengdu, a fan brought him flowers, then started getting stomped by security because he broke the barrier.

Lau Dut Wah jumped right into the fray and broke that shit up with a quickness. Hero.





I admire that my wife wants to bang such cool peeps Tongue

LOL @ the lip sync track still going.

That was Boss Andy though.


RE: Chinese Culture. Movies. Music. Food. Here. - Roland Bates - 10-09-2013 09:38 AM

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2449265/Who-Discovered-America--Controversial-historian-Gavin-Menzies-claims-Chinese-reached-New-World-first.html

"A copy of a 600-year-old map found in a second-hand book shop is the key to proving that the Chinese, not Christopher Columbus, were the first to discover the New World, a controversial British historian claims.

The document is purportedly an 18th century copy of a 1418 map charted by Chinese Admiral Zheng He, which appears to show the New World in some detail.

This purported evidence that a Chinese sailor mapped the Western Hemisphere more than seven decades before Columbus is just one of Earth-shattering claims that author Gavin Menzies makes in his new book ‘Who Discovered America?’ - out today, just in time for the Columbus Day holiday.

‘The traditional story of Columbus discovering the New World is absolute fantasy, it’s fairy tales,’ Mr Menzies told MailOnline.

Among Menzies other claims are that the first inhabitants of the Western hemisphere didn’t come over land from the Bering Strait, but instead were Chinese sailors who first crossed the Pacific Ocean 40,000 years ago.

He also writes that DNA markers prove American Indians and other natives are the descendants of several waves of Asian settlers.

Furthermore, he says a majestic fleet of Chinese ships, commanded by Zheng He, sailed around the continent of South America - 100 years before Ferdinand Megellan supposedly became the first the undertake the task.

Columbus features heavily in the book - insofar as Menzies has devoted the last 20 years to finding and laying out evidence that Columbus not only didn’t discover America - he was 40 millenia late.

Mr Menzies believes that Columbus actually had a map of the world that was plotted by the Chinese Admiral Zheng He, who created the map when he sailed to the New World in 1421, more than seven decades before Columbus.

Mr Menzies has no formal training as a historian and no advanced degree from a major university - he was a submariner in the British Royal Navy - but he can no longer be called an ‘amateur.’

‘Who Discovered America?’ is Menzie’s fourth book in which he tries to re-write history and orient it East.

He has plowed millions of dollars of his proceeds from his books into continuing his world-traveling research into his theories. He has turned his north London home into a de facto research institute, employing up to six research assistants at a time.

But his theories are not accepted by the mainstream academic community. In 2008, University of London history professor Felipe Fernandez-Armesto told the Daily Telegraph that his books are 'the historical equivalent of stories about Elvis Presley in (the supermarket) and close encounters with alien hamsters.'

Even Wikipedia characterizes Menzies as a 'pseudo-historian.'

That has not stopped him from gaining millions of readers - and thousands of followers who contribute to his website and contribute research of their own."