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Fuck. Red Wings just scored again.

Go Tampa!
(04-26-2015 09:40 AM)Megatherium Wrote: [ -> ]So cuckasian it is!

*damnedable jitters

Jesus...... this Canuck is shaking like a blacks writing a bad check. Hopefully he can fix those "sticky keys"

MY GAWD....I just noticed you can't spell Canuck without "cuck"....Makes sense.
A lot of jibber-jabber over a social construct here!
(04-26-2015 09:43 AM)antidisestablishmentarianism Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-26-2015 09:40 AM)Megatherium Wrote: [ -> ]So cuckasian it is!

*damnedable jitters

Jesus...... this Canuck is shaking like a blacks writing a bad check. Hopefully he can fix those "sticky keys"

I just switched over from a black bbw porn site eh anti-D.

Sticky keys are a given!
*fun fact - how many here know about the blacks Caucasians?

Yes, blacks Caucasians (real ones from the Caucasus)...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abkhazians_...an_descent

black in the Caucasus - my God, is nothing sacred?
For those of you who think government policy has no role to play in today's American racial conumdrum let's examine lily white Argentina's pioneering masterwork in racial cleansing/positive social engineering:

Blackout: How Argentina ‘Eliminated’ Africans From Its History And Conscience

Tens of millions of black Africans were forcibly removed from their homelands from the 16th century to the 19th century to toil on the plantations and farms of the New World. This so-called “Middle Passage” accounted for one of the greatest forced migrations of people in human history, as well as one of the greatest tragedies the world has ever witnessed.

Millions of these helpless Africans washed ashore in Brazil -- indeed, in the present-day, roughly one-half of the Brazilian population trace their lineage directly to Africa. African culture has imbued Brazil permanently and profoundly, in terms of music, dance, food and in many other tangible ways.

But what about Brazil's neighbor, Argentina? Hundreds of thousands of Africans were brought there as well – yet, the black presence in Argentina has virtually vanished from the country’s records and consciousness.

According to historical accounts, Africans first arrived in Argentina in the late 16th century in the region now called the Rio de la Plata, which includes Buenos Aires, primarily to work in agriculture and as domestic servants. By the late 18th century and early 19th century, black Africans were numerous in parts of Argentina, accounting for up to half the population in some provinces, including Santiago del Estero, Catamarca, Salta and Córdoba.

In Buenos Aires, neighborhoods like Monserrat and San Telmo housed many black slaves, some of whom were engaged in craft-making for their masters. Indeed, blacks accounted for an estimated one-third of the city’s population, according to surveys taken in the early 1800s.

Slavery was officially abolished in 1813, but the practice remained in place until about 1853. Ironically, at about this time, the black population of Argentina began to plunge.

Historians generally attribute two major factors to this sudden “mass disappearance” of black Africans from the country – the deadly war against Paraguay from 1865-1870 (in which thousands of blacks fought on the frontlines for the Argentine military) as well as various other wars; and the onset of yellow fever in Buenos Aires in 1871.

The heavy casualties suffered by black Argentines in military combat created a huge gender gap among the African population – a circumstance that appears to have led black women to mate with whites, further diluting the black population. Many other black Argentines fled to neighboring Brazil and Uruguay, which were viewed as somewhat more hospitable to them.

Others claim something more nefarious at work.

It has been alleged that the president of Argentina from 1868 to 1874, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, sought to wipe out blacks from the country in a policy of covert genocide through extremely repressive policies (including possibly the forced recruitment of Africans into the army and by forcing blacks to remain in neighborhoods where disease would decimate them in the absence of adequate health care).

Tellingly, Sarmiento wrote in his diary in 1848: “In the United States… 4 million are black, and within 20 years will be 8 [million]…. What is [to be] done with such blacks, hated by the white race? Slavery is a parasite that the vegetation of English colonization has left attached to leafy tree of freedom.”

By 1895, there were reportedly so few blacks left in Argentina that the government did not even bother registering African-descended people in the national census.

The CIA World Factbook currently notes that Argentina is 97 percent white (primarily comprising people descended from Spanish and Italian immigrants), thereby making it the “whitest” nation in Latin America.

But blacks did not really vanish from Argentina – despite attempts by the government to eliminate them (partially by encouraging large-scale immigration in the late 19th and 20th century from Europe and the Near East). Rather, they remain a hidden and forgotten part of Argentine society.

Hisham Aidi, a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, wrote on Planete Afrique that in the 1950s, when the black American entertainer Josephine Baker arrived in Argentina, she asked the mixed-race minister of public health, Ramon Carilio: “Where are the black?” In response, Carilio joked: “There are only two -- you and I.”

As in virtually all Latin American societies where blacks mixed with whites and with local Indians, the question of race is extremely complex and contentious.

“People of mixed ancestry are often not considered ‘black’ in Argentina, historically, because having black ancestry was not considered proper,” said Alejandro Frigerio, an anthropologist at the Universidad Catolica de Buenos Aires, according to Planete Afrique.

“Today the term ‘blacks’ is used loosely on anyone with slightly darker skin, but they can be descendants of indigenous Indians [or] Middle Eastern immigrants.”

AfricaVive, a black empowerment group founded in Buenos Aires in the late 1990s, claimed that there are 1 million Argentines of black African descent in the country (out of a total population of about 41 million). A report in the Washington Post even suggested that 10 percent of Buenos Aires’ population may have African blood (even if they are classified as “whites” by the census).

"People for years have accepted the idea that there are no black people in Argentina," Miriam Gomes, a professor of literature at the University of Buenos Aires, who is part black herself, told the Post.

"Even the schoolbooks here accepted this as a fact. But where did that leave me?"

She also explained that almost no one in Argentina with black blood in their veins will admit to it.

"Without a doubt, racial prejudice is great in this society, and people want to believe that they are white," she said. "Here, if someone has one drop of white blood, they call themselves white."

Gomes also told the San Francisco Chronicle that after many decades of white immigration into Argentina, people with African blood have been able to blend in and conceal their origins.

"Argentina's history books have been partly responsible for misinformation regarding Africans in Argentine society," she said. "Argentines say there are no blacks here. If you're looking for traditional African people with very black skin, you won't find it. African people in Argentina are of mixed heritage."

Ironically, Argentina’s most famous cultural gift to the world – the tango – came from the African influence.

"The first paintings of people dancing the tango are of people of African descent," Gomes added.

On a broader scale, the “elimination” of blacks from the country’s history and consciousness reflected the long-cherished desire of successive Argentine governments to imagine the country as an “all-white” extension of Western Europe in Latin America.

“There is a silence about the participation of Afro-Argentines in the history and building of Argentina, a silence about the enslavement and poverty,” said Paula Brufman, an Argentine law student and researcher, according to Planete Afrique.

“The denial and disdain for the Afro community shows the racism of an elite that sees Africans as undeveloped and uncivilized.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/blackout-how-arge...ce-1289381



A rather stark contrast from the policy of continual stirring of the racial cauldron we see today in the US.
(04-26-2015 10:35 AM)Megatherium Wrote: [ -> ]For those of you who think government policy has no role to play in today's American racial conumdrum let's examine lily white Argentina's pioneering masterwork in racial cleansing/positive social engineering:

Blackout: How Argentina ‘Eliminated’ Africans From Its History And Conscience

Tens of millions of black Africans were forcibly removed from their homelands from the 16th century to the 19th century to toil on the plantations and farms of the New World. This so-called “Middle Passage” accounted for one of the greatest forced migrations of people in human history, as well as one of the greatest tragedies the world has ever witnessed.

Millions of these helpless Africans washed ashore in Brazil -- indeed, in the present-day, roughly one-half of the Brazilian population trace their lineage directly to Africa. African culture has imbued Brazil permanently and profoundly, in terms of music, dance, food and in many other tangible ways.

But what about Brazil's neighbor, Argentina? Hundreds of thousands of Africans were brought there as well – yet, the black presence in Argentina has virtually vanished from the country’s records and consciousness.

According to historical accounts, Africans first arrived in Argentina in the late 16th century in the region now called the Rio de la Plata, which includes Buenos Aires, primarily to work in agriculture and as domestic servants. By the late 18th century and early 19th century, black Africans were numerous in parts of Argentina, accounting for up to half the population in some provinces, including Santiago del Estero, Catamarca, Salta and Córdoba.

In Buenos Aires, neighborhoods like Monserrat and San Telmo housed many black slaves, some of whom were engaged in craft-making for their masters. Indeed, blacks accounted for an estimated one-third of the city’s population, according to surveys taken in the early 1800s.

Slavery was officially abolished in 1813, but the practice remained in place until about 1853. Ironically, at about this time, the black population of Argentina began to plunge.

Historians generally attribute two major factors to this sudden “mass disappearance” of black Africans from the country – the deadly war against Paraguay from 1865-1870 (in which thousands of blacks fought on the frontlines for the Argentine military) as well as various other wars; and the onset of yellow fever in Buenos Aires in 1871.

The heavy casualties suffered by black Argentines in military combat created a huge gender gap among the African population – a circumstance that appears to have led black women to mate with whites, further diluting the black population. Many other black Argentines fled to neighboring Brazil and Uruguay, which were viewed as somewhat more hospitable to them.

Others claim something more nefarious at work.

It has been alleged that the president of Argentina from 1868 to 1874, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, sought to wipe out blacks from the country in a policy of covert genocide through extremely repressive policies (including possibly the forced recruitment of Africans into the army and by forcing blacks to remain in neighborhoods where disease would decimate them in the absence of adequate health care).

Tellingly, Sarmiento wrote in his diary in 1848: “In the United States… 4 million are black, and within 20 years will be 8 [million]…. What is [to be] done with such blacks, hated by the white race? Slavery is a parasite that the vegetation of English colonization has left attached to leafy tree of freedom.”

By 1895, there were reportedly so few blacks left in Argentina that the government did not even bother registering African-descended people in the national census.

The CIA World Factbook currently notes that Argentina is 97 percent white (primarily comprising people descended from Spanish and Italian immigrants), thereby making it the “whitest” nation in Latin America.

But blacks did not really vanish from Argentina – despite attempts by the government to eliminate them (partially by encouraging large-scale immigration in the late 19th and 20th century from Europe and the Near East). Rather, they remain a hidden and forgotten part of Argentine society.

Hisham Aidi, a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, wrote on Planete Afrique that in the 1950s, when the black American entertainer Josephine Baker arrived in Argentina, she asked the mixed-race minister of public health, Ramon Carilio: “Where are the black?” In response, Carilio joked: “There are only two -- you and I.”

As in virtually all Latin American societies where blacks mixed with whites and with local Indians, the question of race is extremely complex and contentious.

“People of mixed ancestry are often not considered ‘black’ in Argentina, historically, because having black ancestry was not considered proper,” said Alejandro Frigerio, an anthropologist at the Universidad Catolica de Buenos Aires, according to Planete Afrique.

“Today the term ‘blacks’ is used loosely on anyone with slightly darker skin, but they can be descendants of indigenous Indians [or] Middle Eastern immigrants.”

AfricaVive, a black empowerment group founded in Buenos Aires in the late 1990s, claimed that there are 1 million Argentines of black African descent in the country (out of a total population of about 41 million). A report in the Washington Post even suggested that 10 percent of Buenos Aires’ population may have African blood (even if they are classified as “whites” by the census).

"People for years have accepted the idea that there are no black people in Argentina," Miriam Gomes, a professor of literature at the University of Buenos Aires, who is part black herself, told the Post.

"Even the schoolbooks here accepted this as a fact. But where did that leave me?"

She also explained that almost no one in Argentina with black blood in their veins will admit to it.

"Without a doubt, racial prejudice is great in this society, and people want to believe that they are white," she said. "Here, if someone has one drop of white blood, they call themselves white."

Gomes also told the San Francisco Chronicle that after many decades of white immigration into Argentina, people with African blood have been able to blend in and conceal their origins.

"Argentina's history books have been partly responsible for misinformation regarding Africans in Argentine society," she said. "Argentines say there are no blacks here. If you're looking for traditional African people with very black skin, you won't find it. African people in Argentina are of mixed heritage."

Ironically, Argentina’s most famous cultural gift to the world – the tango – came from the African influence.

"The first paintings of people dancing the tango are of people of African descent," Gomes added.

On a broader scale, the “elimination” of blacks from the country’s history and consciousness reflected the long-cherished desire of successive Argentine governments to imagine the country as an “all-white” extension of Western Europe in Latin America.

“There is a silence about the participation of Afro-Argentines in the history and building of Argentina, a silence about the enslavement and poverty,” said Paula Brufman, an Argentine law student and researcher, according to Planete Afrique.

“The denial and disdain for the Afro community shows the racism of an elite that sees Africans as undeveloped and uncivilized.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/blackout-how-arge...ce-1289381



A rather stark contrast from the policy of continual stirring of the racial cauldron we see today in the US.

It's easy to pull off given that non-Western history and geography aren't something Western liberals or leftists pay much attention to. So, they are easily inclined to believe the nonsense they spew about the "exceptionalism" of Western racism...
Wow. Awesome article mega!
Probably deserved its own thread as the knowledge within is going to be vastly out shadowed and lost by the flooding of parroted posts with no substance by scared little men with identity crisis.
Quote:parroted posts with no substance by scared little men with identity crisis

Speak for yourself, cuckold.

[Image: cVoVVTb.jpg]

Cuck-a-doodle-DOO!

[Image: 3Bbbjgi.jpg]
(04-26-2015 11:59 AM)BRIC Countries Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-26-2015 10:35 AM)Megatherium Wrote: [ -> ]For those of you who think government policy has no role to play in today's American racial conumdrum let's examine lily white Argentina's pioneering masterwork in racial cleansing/positive social engineering:

Blackout: How Argentina ‘Eliminated’ Africans From Its History And Conscience

Tens of millions of black Africans were forcibly removed from their homelands from the 16th century to the 19th century to toil on the plantations and farms of the New World. This so-called “Middle Passage” accounted for one of the greatest forced migrations of people in human history, as well as one of the greatest tragedies the world has ever witnessed.

Millions of these helpless Africans washed ashore in Brazil -- indeed, in the present-day, roughly one-half of the Brazilian population trace their lineage directly to Africa. African culture has imbued Brazil permanently and profoundly, in terms of music, dance, food and in many other tangible ways.

But what about Brazil's neighbor, Argentina? Hundreds of thousands of Africans were brought there as well – yet, the black presence in Argentina has virtually vanished from the country’s records and consciousness.

According to historical accounts, Africans first arrived in Argentina in the late 16th century in the region now called the Rio de la Plata, which includes Buenos Aires, primarily to work in agriculture and as domestic servants. By the late 18th century and early 19th century, black Africans were numerous in parts of Argentina, accounting for up to half the population in some provinces, including Santiago del Estero, Catamarca, Salta and Córdoba.

In Buenos Aires, neighborhoods like Monserrat and San Telmo housed many black slaves, some of whom were engaged in craft-making for their masters. Indeed, blacks accounted for an estimated one-third of the city’s population, according to surveys taken in the early 1800s.

Slavery was officially abolished in 1813, but the practice remained in place until about 1853. Ironically, at about this time, the black population of Argentina began to plunge.

Historians generally attribute two major factors to this sudden “mass disappearance” of black Africans from the country – the deadly war against Paraguay from 1865-1870 (in which thousands of blacks fought on the frontlines for the Argentine military) as well as various other wars; and the onset of yellow fever in Buenos Aires in 1871.

The heavy casualties suffered by black Argentines in military combat created a huge gender gap among the African population – a circumstance that appears to have led black women to mate with whites, further diluting the black population. Many other black Argentines fled to neighboring Brazil and Uruguay, which were viewed as somewhat more hospitable to them.

Others claim something more nefarious at work.

It has been alleged that the president of Argentina from 1868 to 1874, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, sought to wipe out blacks from the country in a policy of covert genocide through extremely repressive policies (including possibly the forced recruitment of Africans into the army and by forcing blacks to remain in neighborhoods where disease would decimate them in the absence of adequate health care).

Tellingly, Sarmiento wrote in his diary in 1848: “In the United States… 4 million are black, and within 20 years will be 8 [million]…. What is [to be] done with such blacks, hated by the white race? Slavery is a parasite that the vegetation of English colonization has left attached to leafy tree of freedom.”

By 1895, there were reportedly so few blacks left in Argentina that the government did not even bother registering African-descended people in the national census.

The CIA World Factbook currently notes that Argentina is 97 percent white (primarily comprising people descended from Spanish and Italian immigrants), thereby making it the “whitest” nation in Latin America.

But blacks did not really vanish from Argentina – despite attempts by the government to eliminate them (partially by encouraging large-scale immigration in the late 19th and 20th century from Europe and the Near East). Rather, they remain a hidden and forgotten part of Argentine society.

Hisham Aidi, a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, wrote on Planete Afrique that in the 1950s, when the black American entertainer Josephine Baker arrived in Argentina, she asked the mixed-race minister of public health, Ramon Carilio: “Where are the black?” In response, Carilio joked: “There are only two -- you and I.”

As in virtually all Latin American societies where blacks mixed with whites and with local Indians, the question of race is extremely complex and contentious.

“People of mixed ancestry are often not considered ‘black’ in Argentina, historically, because having black ancestry was not considered proper,” said Alejandro Frigerio, an anthropologist at the Universidad Catolica de Buenos Aires, according to Planete Afrique.

“Today the term ‘blacks’ is used loosely on anyone with slightly darker skin, but they can be descendants of indigenous Indians [or] Middle Eastern immigrants.”

AfricaVive, a black empowerment group founded in Buenos Aires in the late 1990s, claimed that there are 1 million Argentines of black African descent in the country (out of a total population of about 41 million). A report in the Washington Post even suggested that 10 percent of Buenos Aires’ population may have African blood (even if they are classified as “whites” by the census).

"People for years have accepted the idea that there are no black people in Argentina," Miriam Gomes, a professor of literature at the University of Buenos Aires, who is part black herself, told the Post.

"Even the schoolbooks here accepted this as a fact. But where did that leave me?"

She also explained that almost no one in Argentina with black blood in their veins will admit to it.

"Without a doubt, racial prejudice is great in this society, and people want to believe that they are white," she said. "Here, if someone has one drop of white blood, they call themselves white."

Gomes also told the San Francisco Chronicle that after many decades of white immigration into Argentina, people with African blood have been able to blend in and conceal their origins.

"Argentina's history books have been partly responsible for misinformation regarding Africans in Argentine society," she said. "Argentines say there are no blacks here. If you're looking for traditional African people with very black skin, you won't find it. African people in Argentina are of mixed heritage."

Ironically, Argentina’s most famous cultural gift to the world – the tango – came from the African influence.

"The first paintings of people dancing the tango are of people of African descent," Gomes added.

On a broader scale, the “elimination” of blacks from the country’s history and consciousness reflected the long-cherished desire of successive Argentine governments to imagine the country as an “all-white” extension of Western Europe in Latin America.

“There is a silence about the participation of Afro-Argentines in the history and building of Argentina, a silence about the enslavement and poverty,” said Paula Brufman, an Argentine law student and researcher, according to Planete Afrique.

“The denial and disdain for the Afro community shows the racism of an elite that sees Africans as undeveloped and uncivilized.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/blackout-how-arge...ce-1289381



A rather stark contrast from the policy of continual stirring of the racial cauldron we see today in the US.

It's easy to pull off given that non-Western history and geography aren't something Western liberals or leftists pay much attention to. So, they are easily inclined to believe the nonsense they spew about the "exceptionalism" of Western racism...

Interestingly, the extinguishing of the Afro-Argentine population coupled with the opening of the floodgates to immigration from Latin Roman Catholic southwestern Europe (and Maronite Catholic Lebanon) was but the first of a two-pronged solution that was to solidify the glorious destiny of what will apparently soon become the last white western nation on earth, curiously isolated from western Europe in the remote southern hemisphere of the new world, and seemingly impervious to the soul-sapping cultural programming besetting the decadent western democracies.

This would be the great patriotic War Of The Desert - the massacre of the indigenous peoples of the vast Patagonian and Gran Chaco regions led by the national heroes General Victorica, and especially, General Roca:

How Argentina became white

The colonial genocide


It is commonplace to assume that the territory that now forms the Republic of Argentina, was almost deserted from the moment of contact with European invaders. But apart from a common place is also a lie. It is true that the population density area was not at all comparable to that held the high Andean and Mesoamerican cultures, but that didn't mean that it was uninhabited. The myth of an immense wild territory that only a few hordes of hunters "barbarians" passed through has been particularly pleasing to the historiography of Argentina, therefore funding the Europanizing model under which the process of nation building was organized. It is very difficult to make population estimates of the magnitude of pre-Hispanic population, especially considering that hunters required fairly large areas to provide for relatively small communities. Many years ago J. Steward proposed that these groups would exceed the 300,000 members, although a more realistic calculation, which includes the high productive capacity of agricultural villages in the northwest, which would amount to only 200,000 people may raise this figure to half a million inhabitants. Yes, perhaps they were not so many, but there they were nonetheless.

From the beginning, the colonial structure of the Rio de la Plata was organized as a port of trade with domains of Upper Peru, controlling an arc-shaped hinterland stretching up to the present borders of Chile and Bolivia. The economic importance of this port grew so much that in 1776 it was configured as the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata, inhabited by a thriving population with a rich ranching economy. During the nearly three centuries of Spanish rule, it wasn't necessary to extend the corridor that communicated with Upper Peru, leaving the vast regions, known as Patagonia and the Gran Chaco as the "land of Indians", whose agricultural population remained in tense relations based on ephemeral treaties, missionary efforts, occasional attacks and punitive expeditions. The Spanish colonial strategy did not require the land, the economy based on the extraction and accumulation did not need a colonial expansion.

The weight of the colonization fell on farming and camelid (llamas) raising people of northwestern Argentina. Sedentary cultures influenced by traditional Andean civilization and especially by the expansion of the Inca empire submitted to the colonial institutions such as "the encomienda" or forced labor and compulsive frequent transfers, their rebellion failed to ensure their survival. Thus, historians believe that during the colonial era most of the local groups were extinguished, victims of violence, epidemics and ethnic dilution resulting from the "recongregations", bringing together people of diverse linguistic and cultural affiliation, and the "disnaturalization" which involved massive transfers over long distances. It is assumed that by the time of the revolution of independence in 1810 indian tribes such as the huarpes, the olongastas, the comechingones, the sanavirones, the diaguitas, the Calchaquíes, the tonocotés, and the pulares of the north had already disappeared . The Jesuits also achieved the disappearance of ethnics such as the Lule and the Vilela of southern Gran Chaco, and on the coast the mbeguá, the chan, the Mocoretá, the mepenes and, by the end of the 19th Century, the kaingang as well. But just like many disappeared other just arrived, and during the 17th and 18th centuries, thousands of Araucanians from Chile entered the Argentine territory running from the colonial war and progressively settled the Patagonian forests, pampas and plains previously inhabited by mountain natives, the pehuenches and tehuelches.

Republican Genocide: the conquest of the "desert"

In the last decades of the nineteenth century, the newly structured centralist state decided to take up the challenge to conquer and consolidate its "borders." These internal borders, euphemistically called "The Desert", were formed by large areas that since the colonial era had been under the control of indigenous groups. For nearly three centuries equestrian hunters of Patagonia and the Gran Chaco had retained their independence, at the expense of an almost constant state of military tension, occasionally disrupted by a short-lived peace treaty. During this time the difficulty of subjecting and subordinating classless societies and chiefdoms were revealed , since they had no power groups that could be destroyed or purchased, or top leaders that could agree with those enduring alliances. The decades that hosted the "Guerra del Malón" (war of raid), as called for military raids against the indigenous natives of the border establishments, had exacerbated ethnic antagonism, ideologically justifying the war of extermination, which Argentina's history suggestively calls "The Conquest of the Desert."

By 1875 the President Nicolás Avellaneda, stated that: "... removing the Indians and occupying the borders does not implicate but to populate the desert ...". The Indians were and were not there, the desert was deserted despite the human presence, but this presence was not white, not even mixed and therefore devoid of recognizable humanity. People meant, ironically, to kill. Depopulate the earth of "those" irreducible and unrecognizable, and replace them with the white image of "us" who ran the emerging national state". Just like this, a set of circumstances, which highlighted the need to effectively occupy nominal borders with neighboring countries, the demand for land by landowners to increase the already highly significant production of meat and grain for export, and the commitment to end the "Indian threat" which allegedly prevented the national setting in terms of a modern state, were the reasons that determined the realization of the successive military expeditions that achieved the Conquest of the Desert. " Starting in 1876, the army, armed by landowners, began open warfare against the "pampas" and Araucanians of the Pampa and Patagonia. This is not the place to discuss in detail the characteristics of this war of extermination, suffice to say that to the cruelty of any war, joined the ethnic contempt that the "civilized" army felt towards the Indians. The result was inevitable, the equestrian warriors were defeated, their villages burned, women and children massacred, they even resorted to biological warfare by sending prisoners with contagious diseases to the villages that wouldn't submit.

In this dramatic process the interest of those who benefited the most from the increase in agricultural export economy was not absent, which incorporated 30 million hectares to the production, I mean to the planters and their British customers. It is no coincidence that in his last tour of the Pampas in 1879, General Roca began the final stage of eradication of the "Indian threat" aboard a train, courtesy of the Buenos Ayres Great Southern Railways Company Limited. Behind the troops would come the modernization and the railroad's presence, increasing transport capacity and accelerating the export economy which continued the colonial legacy.

Almost simultaneously with the invasion of Patagonia, started the military expeditions to the north, against indigenous groups in the vast Chaco region. This area, inhabited by hunters who had developed an equestrian complex since the seventeenth century, were the subject of several attempts by the settlers, including the installation of religious missions, none of which were very successful. In 1870 the military expeditions which attempted the final submission of this contradictory "desert" began , equipped with a geography of forests, savannas and rivers. By 1884 the expedition of General Victorica got the consummation of the Conquest, although had made a new incursion to crush the last remnants of Indian resistances late as 1911. After the defeat, the ancient hunters came to work as farm laborers at timber establishments. But because of the dissatisfaction of the Indians, expressed in continuous rebellions, the local representative of the army signed a contract with the sugar mills of western area in 1914, compromising the indigenous labor and institutionalizing the system of patronage. The military occupation followed by a slow process of civil settlement of the vast "conquered" territory.

It is practically impossible to accurately assess the demographic impact that the military invasion produced, but the record of military confrontations in the nineteenth century figures 10.656 native were killed in Pampa and Patagonia and 1, 679 in the Chaco. However, no one registered the many thousands of deaths from hunger, thirst, cold, or victims of deliberately transmitted diseases. The highly unreliable 1895 census found that some 180 000 people had survived , but these are only estimates.

Once the conquest of the "desert" was accomplished and its inhabitants cornered in the border or forced as farm workers, Argentina took another step forward, after depopulating it was necessary to populate. The State that had defeated the Indians had, in 1880, less than 2.5 million people to take around three million km2 of territory. But that settlement had to be made up with white Europeans who coincide with the image of the ruling elite. By the 1880's, a key decade in shaping today's Argentina, Buenos Aires was already an important sounding board for new ideas that came from Liberal Europe. Social Darwinism and the almost theological idea of progress had its paradigm of reference in white Europe and led the effort to model the population. Thus, immigration laws were passed between 1871 and 1914 5.5731 million immigrants arrived to Argentina, of which 2.7204 million emigrated back, leaving about 2.8524 million new Argentinians . And in a little over four decades, immigration made a settlement of about three million people, most of which came from Italy, followed by Spanish and perhaps 20% of French, English, Slavic and Syrian-Lebanese. If we add to this figure the vegetative growth for 1914 the total population amounted to 8,253,097 inhabitants, which loosely tripled the number of 1880. The desire of having a white nation had been accomplished, in fact by the early twentieth century Argentina liked to be compare with Australia, a booming British colony to which Argentina had exceeded growth in production and demographics.

The current survivors

The racist ideology derived from the war of conquest was largely transmitted by European immigrants, setting a historic block in which the presence of indigenous peoples was not only despised but also considered a relictual archaism and redundant. The present Indian situation is unfortunately similar to that of most indigenous peoples of Latin America. The Mapuche survivors have been cornered in reductions (land reserves allocated by the state), most of which are equipped with poor land and located in the inhospitable Andean spurs or the Patagonian tundra where the climate is extremely harsh and impossible to development of profitable agriculture. The raising of sheep, a poor agriculture, and harvesting of the pine fruit are insufficient resources that require a good apart from the populations to migrate, either temporarily or permanently to urban centers where there is demand for unskilled labor.

http://culturepotion.blogspot.ca/2010/05...ocide.html
(04-26-2015 12:32 PM)Alfredo Wrote: [ -> ]Wow. Awesome article mega!
Probably deserved its own thread as the knowledge within is going to be vastly out shadowed and lost by the flooding of parroted posts with no substance by scared little men with identity crisis.

THE ALTS COME OUT AT NIGHT!

THE ALTS COME OUT AT NIGHT!

THE ALTS COME OUT AT NIGHT!

THE ALTS COME OUT AT NIGHT!

THE ALTS COME OUT AT NIGHT!



Preach, brotha! PREACH!

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Continuing our search for positive proven solutions to the racial conflict blighting the USA and indeed much of the western world today, let's examine the Mexican approach, or Mestizaje: fucking the black man out of existence - a novel Mexican solution to the problem of the existence of the blacks inside the Mexican republic. That meant Blanco on blacks, blacks on Indio, Castizo on Mulatto, Zambo on Cambuso, Chamiso on Lobo, Albarazado on Barcino, and so on and so forth until the great fuckfest had rendered the black factor but a distant memory, forgotten by the vast majority of today`s average Joses.

When all else fails, good old targeted fornication has been demonstrably effective in the removal of the once considerable African presence in Mexico. Sure, you might wind up with a few individuals that look like Gilbert Melendez

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here and there, notably in Veracruz state and inland from Acapulco (and the attendant drop in mental test performance) but isn't it a small price to pay for social cohesion!

The “Cosmic Race” (La “Raza Cósmica”) excludes Mexico’s African heritage

Many Chicano activists refer to Mexicans as “La Raza”, literally “the race”. “Dia de la Raza” is celebrated on Columbus Day (October 12) as the day the Mexican indigenous population started their resistance against the European invasion.

The term “La Raza” derives from a 1948 book “La Raza Cósmica.” The author Jose Vasconcelos’ thesis is that Mexicans (who he defines as a combination of indigenous and European bloodlines) are a new superior race. In developing his thesis, Vasconcelos draws upon many concepts including Marxism; he felt Europeans were too materialistic and capitalistic. He suggested that Mexicans have evolved (à la Darwin) into a new race that would be a world leader in the years ahead. The Government of Mexico tacitly agreed with this approach which engendered national pride. It was also consistent with the government’s post Mexican Revolution view that all ethnic groups should be combined into a common Mexican national identity.

According to the 2010 census, about 15% consider themselves indigenous, though about 58% of these do not speak any indigenous language. Assuming the “white” and “other” categories are still about 10% and 2% respectively, this suggests that today about 73% are mestizos. Almost all people in Mexico refer to themselves simply as “Mexicans”, not as indigenous Mexicans or mestizos or whites.

Vasconcelos’ “Raza Cósmica” and most Mexicans overlook the historical fact that Mexicans have an important African heritage. Between 100,000 to 200,000 African slaves were brought into Mexico during the 16th through 18th centuries, nearly a quarter the number brought to the USA. In 1646 there were 35,000 African slaves in Mexico, more than 2.5 times the white population [see Blacks outnumbered Spaniards in Mexico until after 1810]. These slaves represented about 12% of the total population, roughly equal to the percentage of slaves in the USA before 1860.

Mexico’s second president, Vicente Guerrero, whose mother was partially Black, abolished slavery in 1829. Thousands of Blacks moved into Mexico from the USA before it abolished slavery in 1865. However, today there are very very few black faces in Mexico. One can spend weeks in Mexico’s major cities without seeing a Black Mexican. If one pays close attention, they can identify people of African heritage in a few selected communities in Veracruz and along the Costa Chica in Guerrero and Oaxaca.

What happened to all the Blacks in Mexico? In a word they assimilated by having offspring with other racial groups. In colonial times, the Catholic Church went to great lengths to categorize intermixed races for marital and baptism purposes. Before too long, nobody could keep all the combinations straight! Eventually, everyone of mixed race was considered a mestizo. The African portion was purposely or accidentally dropped.

Modern research, based on DNA, indicates that Mexican mestizos are genetically about one-eighth African [mtDNA Affinities of the Peoples of North-Central Mexico]. While Brazil is often identified as the world’s foremost melting pot, the evidence suggests that in Mexico the races have melted more than in any other country.

While there are very few black faces in Mexico, there is a great deal of African heritage represented in art, music, dance, food, and even in fishing and agricultural practices. Did you know that the popular Mexican song “La Bamba” recorded by Richie Valens, Los Lobos and others can be traced back to the Bamba district of Angola? As part of the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ famous voyage, the Government of Mexico finally acknowledged officially that Africa was Mexico’s “Third Root”.

http://geo-mexico.com/?tag=ethnicity
That kinda shit is put out to weaken prideful groups like mexicans

You wanna break a maisn who is proud of his ethnicity just tell him he has blacks In
him

Also plays into therapeutic afro-centrism.blacks love to feel like they arent alone in inferior dna

You will be hard pressed to find a moolie that doesnt claim native ancestry and our dna Isnt exactly overflowing with civility

As long as they dont have to admit to be full blooded blacks with no respectable history though
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