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What has been your experience on the relationship between martial arts schools and communism? What is their view on Communism?

China
Our high school class read a book about a visitor to China who was tutored by a martial arts master there. The student talked about how he went to class an hour early and the master was already there and chided him (of course softly) for not being there early enough. Kung Fu and Tai chi are both popular in China. I don't know of Kung Fu movies discussing Communism though.


Korea

Visitors to North Korea have practiced Tae Kwan Do with North Korean youth. It's popular in both Koreas.


In our Tae Kwan Do class in the US,
the teachers were American as most are. They were physically strong, maybe 40-50 years old and certainly confident. There was a sense of authority- it was more than just being a coach. They did not really talk about Korean or US politics, but it was fun having friendly conversations after class. One did mention simply a repetition of the normal US perception of Korea, with the south being democratic and the north a bad dictatorship.

My own opinion is that there is truth in the US image of the Koreas, but it is misleading. North Korea is probably as authoritarian as Stalin's rule, perhaps more in some ways and less than others. North Korea makes their leader even more of a cult figure than Stalin did. Their system is very militarized, not just because they are East Asian and Stalinist, but because they have been at war constantly since 1950 and S.K. is twice its size in population and even more in economy.

But it's misleading too, because North Korea's prison rate is about the same as the US's. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cou...ation_rate
There must be more political prisoners than in the US. Also, South Korea was a dictatorship for a long time and tortured dissidents. it may still be one. North Korea's schools are still far nicer to students as North Korean refugees in S.K. say, and that means a lot. The whole Cold war on Communism was projected in the US mainly as a war on dictatorship, and yet both Koreas were dictatorships and might still be.

Other
Do Mongolia, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam even have Martial Arts?
(01-17-2015 06:31 AM)Count Iblis Wrote: [ -> ]Vietnam does have martial arts.

Võ thuật Bình Định

Vovinam Việt Võ Đạo
Sure. But how important are they in Vietnamese culture? Tae Kwan Do seems to be a huge part of Korea's culture

Glove boxing and freestyle wresting have long been staples of American sports, but people don't usually describe them as "martial" arts, perhaps because they are not intended to risk killing or disabling someone. That is, they are not really something you would use in war. They are not "all-out" fighting.
As a "military brat" I had always an access to community services the military offered. As an officers son I learned Kyokushinkai, aikido and some Kempo at the sports facility with accredited trained instructors. Communist no but close growing up in and around a propellor head (old man) and a regiment to match.

Fighting is the life skill that contributes to my well being and over all continued success in my life

Thank you Jesus and Bruce Lee
I'm afraid that I don't know a whole lot about Vietnamese culture.

My own martial art is what I'll simply refer to swordsmanship. Primarily this has been modern sport fencing, Italian rapier, and traditional German longsword. However I've also done some study in Iaido, Kendo, and Chinese swordsmanship as well as Polish saber. So I'm pretty well set for the Zombie Apocalypse.
Martial Arts are about teaching generational knowledge from one to the next.. it is patriarchal and traditional.

this is why the bolshevik west banned a lot of TMA in Japan after WW2.
South Korea is def. not a dictatorship but the net is censored for some topics, esp. relating to NK.
sanshou sanda may be more related to communism.
(01-17-2015 04:22 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote: [ -> ]sanshou sanda may be more related to communism.

the creation of Sanda was directly related to the development of Soviet Sambo.
(01-17-2015 06:23 AM)Rako Wrote: [ -> ]What has been your experience on the relationship between martial arts schools and communism? What is their view on Communism?

China
Our high school class read a book about a visitor to China who was tutored by a martial arts master there. The student talked about how he went to class an hour early and the master was already there and chided him (of course softly) for not being there early enough. Kung Fu and Tai chi are both popular in China. I don't know of Kung Fu movies discussing Communism though.


In the early to mid 90s I trained under this military dude from China in Military Sanda. He trained a small group of students at the University of Toronto and I used to sneak into the Athletic Center twice a week to train with them. I never spoke with him about communism though. If the Chinese authorities found out that he was teaching their military martial arts abroad, he'd be arrested if he ever go back. So in magazines that he was interviewed in, he always claimed that he was taught by his uncle who was a military man.

Anyways, the dude was very non-traditional. In fact he shunned everything traditional. Did not believe in form/kata and sparred full contact, until students start getting injured too much, so he switched to semi-contact. I introduced him to this other group I trained with who were learning BJJ from Renzo Gracie VHS tapes (at the time there was no BJJ in Toronto). He took an interest in the ground grappling, but he wanted to strike on the ground whereas the BJJ group only wanted to focus on grappling, so it didn't work out. I heard he actually sent Harold Howard (karate flip kick dude from early UFC) an offer to train him after the flip kick incident. Howard never replied, LOL
Communism banned martial arts I believe boxing kick boxing Judo were all banned in the Soviet states until the 80.
why do you have your dinner as your avatar?
(01-18-2015 04:04 AM)PUBLICnoose Wrote: [ -> ]Communism banned martial arts I believe boxing kick boxing Judo were all banned in the Soviet states until the 80.

This is incorrect.
(01-18-2015 04:32 AM)rezin Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-18-2015 04:04 AM)PUBLICnoose Wrote: [ -> ]Communism banned martial arts I believe boxing kick boxing Judo were all banned in the Soviet states until the 80.

This is incorrect.
I must have miss remembered
they banned western and Asian martial arts in the sovier union
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