Evil Academy

Full Version: News & Current Events
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
(04-12-2014 09:28 AM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote: [ -> ]over a dozen cases this year.

seems kind of strange.

Jay Weidner said these bankers were working for BRICS and were operatives.

Dont' know about that, but at least some of the cases seem fishy

Ya, you can only have so many coincidences before the odds of everything being a coincidence become greater than making a perfect March Madness bracket.
(04-12-2014 10:10 AM)canuckster Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-12-2014 09:27 AM)GMB13 Wrote: [ -> ]Scumbag bankers dropping like flies.

Surprised Jim flahertys death hasn't been listed yet.

Wow, dead 3 weeks after retiring as a finance minister. That is sketchy as fuck. Sounds like a loose end being tied to me.
Quote:Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. kicked off the process for what may be the biggest U.S. initial public offering in two years after struggling to persuade Hong Kong regulators to approve its proposed governance structure.

China’s biggest e-commerce company plans to work with Credit Suisse Group AG, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley and Citigroup Inc., according to a person familiar with the matter. Investment banks value Alibaba, founded by former English teacher Jack Ma, at as much as $200 billion, which would make it the second-biggest Internet company behind Google Inc. based on market capitalization.

“The U.S. has obvious advantages in terms of the depth of the pool of capital and sophistication of the investor base,” said Duncan Clark, Beijing-based chairman of BDA China Ltd., which advises technology companies. “In terms of the control issue, Jack and the management, it seems that the Hong Kong stock exchange wasn’t able to accommodate.”

Alibaba has decided to start the process for an IPO in the U.S., and a future listing in China may be considered “should circumstances permit,” the Hangzhou-based company said yesterday in a statement. Alibaba proposed that its partners nominate a majority of the board of directors, a system that isn’t allowed under Hong Kong rules.

SoftBank Surges

The IPO may be the biggest since Facebook Inc. in 2012 and is a blow to Hong Kong, which hasn’t hosted an initial share sale of more than $4 billion since October 2010. Alibaba hasn’t decided when to file for the listing, which U.S. exchange to list on, how much to raise or how large a stake to sell, the person familiar said.

“This will make us a more global company and enhance the company’s transparency,” Alibaba said in the statement. “Should circumstances permit in the future, we will be constructive toward extending our public status in the China capital market.”

Alibaba bought back a 20 percent stake from Yahoo! Inc. in 2012 in a deal that valued the Chinese company at $35 billion. The Sunnyvale, California-based Web portal still owns 24 percent of Alibaba while Japan’s SoftBank Corp. owns about 37 percent stake, the companies have said.

SoftBank rose 6.1 percent to 8,200 yen as of 1:57 p.m. in Tokyo, headed for the biggest jump since August. The Topix index declined 1.1 percent.

“SoftBank’s share price went up because of Alibaba’s IPO story,” said Satoru Kikuchi, an analyst at SMBC Nikko Securities Inc. in Tokyo.
Goldman, JPMorgan

SoftBank President Masayoshi Son likely will use money gained from the Alibaba IPO to acquire companies in the information technology and Internet industries, he said.

The company hasn’t signed official contracts with banks for the IPO, the person said. Representatives of Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank and Citigroup declined to comment. A spokesman for Morgan Stanley wasn’t available to comment.

Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley will have equal roles on the IPO, while Citigroup will be in a more junior position, the person with knowledge of the matter said.

The prospectus for an IPO may be disclosed as soon as April, people familiar with the matter have said. The company is also working with New York-based law firm Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, two people familiar with the matter have said.
GM, Visa

Alibaba may sell about a 12 percent stake in itself, said one person with knowledge of the matter, making it an $18.4 billion offering based on the $153 billion average valuation of analysts, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

That would surpass General Motors Co.’s 2010 sale to rank behind Visa Inc. as the second-biggest U.S. IPO ever, according to the data. Facebook raised $16 billion in May 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Alibaba’s expansion since Ma started the company in his Hangzhou apartment in 1999 with two dozen items for sale mirrors China’s emergence as an economic superpower. The company had about 25,000 employees at the end of February and generated about 70 percent of package deliveries in China in 2012. Customers bought 35 billion yuan ($5.7 billion) of goods on one sales promotion day via Alibaba’s two main platforms last year.
Surging Sales

The success has made Ma, 49, one of China’s richest people, with an estimated net worth of $11.4 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

There is still room for growth. China has 618 million Internet users, greater than the population of any other country except India, and McKinsey & Co. estimates China’s Internet retail market will triple to $395 billion from 2011 to 2015.

Alibaba, which operates online markets for products from Louis Vuitton bags to Boston lobsters, posted its fourth straight quarterly profit on surging sales. Net income attributable to ordinary shareholders was $792 million in the three months ended September, a 12 percent increase from the June quarter, according to a January presentation from Yahoo! Inc., which owns a 24 percent stake. Revenue rose 51 percent to $1.78 billion.
Higher Valuations

Analyst valuations of Alibaba rose 28 percent after the earnings, with the company worth $153 billion, according to the average of 10 estimates compiled by Bloomberg News in February. That would make it bigger than 95 percent of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index.

Macquarie Group Ltd. estimated Alibaba could be worth $200 billion. Google has a market capitalization of $394 billion; Amazon $172 billion; and Facebook, owner of the world’s largest social network, $172 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Billionaire Ma Huateng’s Tencent Holdings Ltd., operator of the WeChat instant messaging service, is the biggest Hong Kong- traded Internet success story so far. Shares have soared almost 150 times from the June 2004 IPO price of HK$3.70, giving the company a market value of $132 billion.

The IPO of Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook valued the company at $104 billion, and the shares lost as much as half their value in the first few months of trading before starting to recover. On Aug. 3, Facebook closed above its $38 offering price for the first time after mobile-ad sales surged. The stock closed at $67.72 on Friday.
Exchange Response

Alibaba’s $792 million profit in the September quarter, the most recently disclosed by Yahoo, compares with the $422 million Facebook earned in the same period and Tencent’s net income of 3.9 billion yuan, or $634 million.

Alibaba asked Hong Kong’s exchange to allow a partnership of executives and shareholders to nominate the majority of board members, a person with knowledge of the matter said in August. That would enable Ma, who owns 7.4 percent, and his management team to maintain control.

Hong Kong’s bourse doesn’t allow share classes with different voting rights, as the U.S. does. Such arrangements helped Zuckerberg and Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin keep control of their companies after they went public.

The Hong Kong exchange needs to find ways to make the market more responsive and competitive, particularly with new economy or technology companies, Chief Executive Charles Li said today in an e-mailed statement.
Partnership Structure

Alibaba would “never” change its partnership structure, Reuters cited Executive Vice Chairman Joseph Tsai as saying in an interview on March 12.

“Alibaba’s preference to keep its partnership structure is probably the biggest reason why it chose to list in the U.S.,” said Stephen Yang, a Hong Kong-based analyst at Sun Hung Kai Financial Ltd.

Under Alibaba’s proposal, all shareholders would vote on the company’s nominees, with partners being able to nominate an alternate board member if shareholders reject a candidate, the person familiar with Alibaba’s thinking said. No other investor rights would be changed, the person said.

The company has 28 partners, Ma said in a Sept. 10 e-mail to employees.

After starting as a business-to-business marketplace on Alibaba.com, the company has morphed into a more consumer-focused operation. Its most popular platforms include Taobao Marketplace, which links individual buyers and sellers, and Tmall.com, which connects consumers to retail brands.

Affiliate Alipay, an online payment system like EBay Inc.’s PayPal, had more than 800 million registered accounts as of July. Alibaba also is expanding into financial services, mobile-phone operating systems and TV set-top boxes.

“Alibaba from day one has been based around making money, and it’s a real Chinese Internet success story,” said Mark Tanner, the founder of China Skinny, a Shanghai-based research and marketing agency. “Alibaba is huge now but will just continue to get a lot bigger.”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-16...ering.html
Online Bill Pay is just starting to really take off in China.

Lots of investors looking into plays for this
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/1...K120140412


"A senior Chinese official hit back on Saturday at International Monetary Fund warnings that China's economy faced the danger of a hard landing due to poor asset quality, saying the government was taking action to deal with financial risk.

Chinese Vice Finance Minister Zhu Guangyao said China worked closely with the IMF but did not agree with all of its analysis.

"In general, we think they are a very professional financial institution, but some of the methodology used and some traditional thinking, they also need reform," he told a small group of Western journalists on the sidelines of the IMF and World Bank spring meetings in Washington.

"We hope that their analysis and methodology can really reflect a country's reality," he said. "We said not just to the IMF, but also to the World Bank, that not one size fits all. If your policy suggestion is (to be) a valuable suggestion, you must base it on reality."

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde warned of the risk of what she termed a "hard landing" in China, the world's second-largest economy, and negative repercussions on other emerging markets in her Global Policy Agenda released at the start of the meetings in Washington on Thursday.

While her report said the risk was small, it urged China to rein in risks in its shadow banking system and liberalize its financial sector to improve the allocation of credit.

Zhu said Chinese President Xi Jinping had publicly recognized that China faced a challenge over the issue of shadow banks.

"We are beginning to take action, including strengthening management, monitoring and supervision," he said, adding that he believed China had handled the situation well, having drawn lessons from the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers.

"Compared with how the U.S. and the Europeans handled Lehman Brothers and the sovereign debt issue, we think that China is the most successful - so far!" he said.

'PICTURE IS VERY CLEAR'

Zhu said state-owned investment companies known as local-government financing vehicles were already nationally audited to clarify what was government debt and what was government-guaranteed debt.

"The picture is very clear," he said. "Now we are facing the challenge, strengthening the management on the local government financing vehicle issue."

Overall, Lagarde's report urged countries to do more to boost growth.

Beijing's economy has been slowing, but it has been at pains to play down market speculation that it might launch a large stimulus package, saying instead that it would fine-tune policies to ensure unemployment did not rise.

On Thursday, Yi Gang, a vice governor of the People's Bank of China, said in Washington that China's government and central bank should be "very cautious" in implementing any stimulus programs because they tended to be less efficient than natural market forces in boosting growth.

Zhu said China had recognized the need to change the speed of growth and added that a four-trillion-yuan stimulus package launched in 2008 had worsened the country's environmental problems, which needed to be dealt with.

He said that after the years of fast growth, key priorities were to create jobs and improve living conditions. He said the government was addressing such issues by providing tax relief for small business and investing in housing and rural railways.

Zhu rejected the views of some analysts who link a government anti-corruption drive with the economic slowdown.

"We think anti-corruption is a very important job," he said. It's a fundamental principle for any government that it must be a clean government. They must serve the people."
This crackdown on corruption has been of the biggest in modern times.

Hundreds of high level people have been rounded up.
Turbo Tax lobbies against simplified Tax filing

A software company that promises to help Americans avoid the annual misery of filing their IRS returns has, in fact, spent years trying to convince lawmakers to make sure filing taxes remains difficult, thus protecting its business, a new report found.

http://rt.com/usa/turbo-tax-harder-than-necessary-500/
http://www.trueactivist.com/netherlands-...criminals/

"In 2009, the Dutch justice ministry announced the planned closing of eight prisons in the Netherlands due to a declining crime rate which was expected to continue.

In 2013, a staggering 19 prisons were scheduled to be closed. This is caused, in part, by a continued decline in crime rates. Additionally, those who are convicted are choosing electronic tagging instead of incarceration. This allows people to go back to work and continue as productive members of society. It also saves about $50,000 per year per person (about $50 million saved per year for every 1000 people).

Johnson County and the Netherlands have something in common. The average incarceration rate in the Netherlands is about 163 people per 100,000. (Source) In Johnson County, we have about the same rate of incarceration – slightly lower. (Source: 2012 Annual Sheriff’s Report – PDF)

Counties and countries with low incarceration rates typically take a different approach to criminal justice and their investment in social services.

In the Netherlands, for example, the focus is on “deterring and mitigating crime” as well as “sanctioning those who violate laws with … rehabilitation efforts.” (Source)

This is similar to the approach taken in Johnson County with jail alternatives and investing in local social services. The county recently invested approximately $2.3 million into a portfolio of local organisations that have demonstrated a history of success with improving the quality of life in Johnson County.

While progressive drug laws in the Netherlands may be partially the reason for a decline in arrests, other social factors are also at work. This points to crime reduction through changing social behaviour as a key to reducing incarceration — rather than just changing the laws or telling police to stop arresting people as a method for artificially creating the perception that there’s less crime."
Good stuff. there are many aspects of these northern europeans that I like.

they seem more humane in some ways.

but i don't like how they buy into cultural marxism.
Quote:This year April 15 is more than the tax deadline for an estimated one million New York State residents. It’s also the deadline to register “assault weapons” and “high-capacity” magazines. If they don’t, they’ll begin living outside the law. A lot of them have decided to do just that. They’ve decided to practice civil disobedience even though failure to register an “assault weapon” by the deadline is punishable as a “class A misdemeanor,” which means a maximum sentence of one year in prison.

I put “assault weapon” and “high-capacity” in quotes because their definitions vary by state—they’re political terms. In New York State, the SAFE Act passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo in January 2013, uses an expansive and elaborate definition of “assault weapon” that includes a lot more than AR-15s. Now even a semiautomatic Remington Model 1100 shotgun—a popular shotgun first made in 1963 that is used by millions of hunters and skeet shooters—is an “assault weapon” in New York State if the shotgun has a pistol grip. Many other commonly owned pistols, shotguns and rifles are also now labeled “assault weapons” in New York State.

When I asked the New York State Police how many New York gun owners had registered the guns they own that now fit somewhere into the state’s expansive “assault weapons” category the state responded: “New York State Police cannot release information related to the registration of assault weapons including the number of assault weapons registered. Those records you seek are derived from information collected for the State Police database and are, therefore, exempt from disclosure.”

This is the same dilemma Connecticut gun owners found themselves in at the end of 2013. As of December 31, 2013, according to Lt. J. Paul Vance of the Connecticut State Police (CSP CSPI +1.59%), the state had received 41,347 applications to register “assault weapons” and 36,932 applications to register “high-capacity” magazines. That means that more than 300,000 Connecticut residents decided not to register their “assault weapons,” moved them out of state, or sold them.
(04-14-2014 08:09 AM)Roland Bates Wrote: [ -> ]http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/1...K120140412


"A senior Chinese official hit back on Saturday at International Monetary Fund warnings that China's economy faced the danger of a hard landing due to poor asset quality, saying the government was taking action to deal with financial risk.

Chinese Vice Finance Minister Zhu Guangyao said China worked closely with the IMF but did not agree with all of its analysis.

"In general, we think they are a very professional financial institution, but some of the methodology used and some traditional thinking, they also need reform," he told a small group of Western journalists on the sidelines of the IMF and World Bank spring meetings in Washington.

"We hope that their analysis and methodology can really reflect a country's reality," he said. "We said not just to the IMF, but also to the World Bank, that not one size fits all. If your policy suggestion is (to be) a valuable suggestion, you must base it on reality."

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde warned of the risk of what she termed a "hard landing" in China, the world's second-largest economy, and negative repercussions on other emerging markets in her Global Policy Agenda released at the start of the meetings in Washington on Thursday.

While her report said the risk was small, it urged China to rein in risks in its shadow banking system and liberalize its financial sector to improve the allocation of credit.

Zhu said Chinese President Xi Jinping had publicly recognized that China faced a challenge over the issue of shadow banks.

"We are beginning to take action, including strengthening management, monitoring and supervision," he said, adding that he believed China had handled the situation well, having drawn lessons from the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers.

"Compared with how the U.S. and the Europeans handled Lehman Brothers and the sovereign debt issue, we think that China is the most successful - so far!" he said.

'PICTURE IS VERY CLEAR'

Zhu said state-owned investment companies known as local-government financing vehicles were already nationally audited to clarify what was government debt and what was government-guaranteed debt.

"The picture is very clear," he said. "Now we are facing the challenge, strengthening the management on the local government financing vehicle issue."

Overall, Lagarde's report urged countries to do more to boost growth.

Beijing's economy has been slowing, but it has been at pains to play down market speculation that it might launch a large stimulus package, saying instead that it would fine-tune policies to ensure unemployment did not rise.

On Thursday, Yi Gang, a vice governor of the People's Bank of China, said in Washington that China's government and central bank should be "very cautious" in implementing any stimulus programs because they tended to be less efficient than natural market forces in boosting growth.

Zhu said China had recognized the need to change the speed of growth and added that a four-trillion-yuan stimulus package launched in 2008 had worsened the country's environmental problems, which needed to be dealt with.

He said that after the years of fast growth, key priorities were to create jobs and improve living conditions. He said the government was addressing such issues by providing tax relief for small business and investing in housing and rural railways.

Zhu rejected the views of some analysts who link a government anti-corruption drive with the economic slowdown.

"We think anti-corruption is a very important job," he said. It's a fundamental principle for any government that it must be a clean government. They must serve the people."

I think Zhu is way off base here. Government corruption is nowhere near as important as the current state of the economy.



All levels of government corruption are acceptable as long as the economy continues to grow.

-IMFers.
it's hilarious how they would blame china's slowdown on China cracking down on corruption.

China cracking down on corruption makes the NWO look bad because they have failed to crack down on their own corruption.

China has rounded up very high level corrupt people and have seized their wealth.
(04-16-2014 02:16 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote: [ -> ]it's hilarious how they would blame china's slowdown on China cracking down on corruption.

China cracking down on corruption makes the NWO look bad because they have failed to crack down on their own corruption.

China has rounded up very high level corrupt people and have seized their wealth.

Its cringe worthy delusion to place the state of the economy above all else.
Man, 77, dies after collapsing near D.C. fire station and not getting immediate aid

In a nearby parking lot, Marie Mills cradled her 77-year-old father in her arms. “Help is on the way,” she told him. “There are firefighters right across the street.”

But the firefighters didn’t come. When she spotted one standing in an open bay door, she ran to the curb. “Can you just come and help my dad?” she screamed. “What are you going to do, let my dad die in the street?”

Mills said she was told by people who tried to help that the firefighters said that they couldn’t respond unless someone called 911. It took 15 to 20 minutes for help to show up on Saturday, she said, and then arrived only because a D.C. police officer flagged down an ambulance that happened to pass by. Her father, Medric Cecil Mills Jr., died of an apparent heart attack at MedStar Washington Hospital Center that afternoon. He had worked for the District parks department for over four decades and liked his job so much that he hadn’t retired.

“There are no words to describe how this city has failed,” Mills said on Wednesday.

District authorities are investigating Mills’s death and have ordered 15 firefighters on duty that day to headquarters for questioning. One was told to drive in from his home in Pennsylvania.

Although details of what transpired in the station are under review, the basic outline of what Mills has said is not in dispute. The incident was first reported by WTTG (Channel 5).

“I’m quite disturbed and disappointed by what appears to be an inappropriate response,” said Paul A. Quander Jr., the deputy mayor for public safety. “Mr. Mills was someone that worked for the District for a number of years, and the pain and the anguish that the family has gone through is unacceptable. There will be no rush to judgment, but we will be thorough, we will be precise and then we will act.”

Quander said nothing should stop a firefighter from helping someone in distress. “They don’t wait to be called,” he said. “We should have responded to this incident.”

READ THE FULL STORY: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crim...story.html
(04-16-2014 06:29 PM)Gimp Wrote: [ -> ]Man, 77, dies after collapsing near D.C. fire station and not getting immediate aid

In a nearby parking lot, Marie Mills cradled her 77-year-old father in her arms. “Help is on the way,” she told him. “There are firefighters right across the street.”

But the firefighters didn’t come. When she spotted one standing in an open bay door, she ran to the curb. “Can you just come and help my dad?” she screamed. “What are you going to do, let my dad die in the street?”

Mills said she was told by people who tried to help that the firefighters said that they couldn’t respond unless someone called 911. It took 15 to 20 minutes for help to show up on Saturday, she said, and then arrived only because a D.C. police officer flagged down an ambulance that happened to pass by. Her father, Medric Cecil Mills Jr., died of an apparent heart attack at MedStar Washington Hospital Center that afternoon. He had worked for the District parks department for over four decades and liked his job so much that he hadn’t retired.

“There are no words to describe how this city has failed,” Mills said on Wednesday.

District authorities are investigating Mills’s death and have ordered 15 firefighters on duty that day to headquarters for questioning. One was told to drive in from his home in Pennsylvania.

Although details of what transpired in the station are under review, the basic outline of what Mills has said is not in dispute. The incident was first reported by WTTG (Channel 5).

“I’m quite disturbed and disappointed by what appears to be an inappropriate response,” said Paul A. Quander Jr., the deputy mayor for public safety. “Mr. Mills was someone that worked for the District for a number of years, and the pain and the anguish that the family has gone through is unacceptable. There will be no rush to judgment, but we will be thorough, we will be precise and then we will act.”

Quander said nothing should stop a firefighter from helping someone in distress. “They don’t wait to be called,” he said. “We should have responded to this incident.”

READ THE FULL STORY: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crim...story.html

I expect a significant and successful lawsuit to take place, but that wont bring the 77 year old back. In Vermont, I believe you are required to act under such circumstances if you are certified in first aid/cpr. Moreso if you wear a uniform. Scumbag move by those lazy fucks.
Reference URL's