Evil Academy

Full Version: News & Current Events
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
^ Sounds like bull shit to me. How were the ratings?
D'OH PLEASE DELETE
pyramid and eye huh?
[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR3B-BWc8a0c6Ji3owapCe...1ZPbltkOFQ]
http://ecowatch.com/2014/03/02/hundreds-...ystone-xl/

Today more than 1,200 youths from across the country marched to the White House from Georgetown University—where President Obama laid out his “climate test”—to protest the Keystone XL pipeline. Once at the White House, 400 youths were arrested while participating in a nonviolent civil disobedience sit-in. This protest was the largest youth act of civil disobedience at the White House in a generation.

As the fight over the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline seems be accelerating towards a final decision, protestors have turned up the heat on President Obama to reject the project as this major, youth-led protest, XL Dissent, took over the White House.

“As the fight to stop KXL enters its final stages, it’s truly inspiring to see young people at the forefront,” said Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org. “This pipeline is scheduled to last 40 years—right through the prime of their lives. President Obama needs to look them in the face.”

The young people represented more than 50 colleges and universities taking action in solidarity with groups on the frontlines of dirty energy expansion and climate impacts, such as First Nations and refining communities, ranchers and farmers along the route, and those fighting tar sands expansion in Michigan and beyond.

“The construction of Keystone XL will be ‘game over’ on the climate front, as climatologist Jim Hansen has stated,” said Conor Kennedy on the XL Dissent website. “Most of us understand that we have reached the tipping point. The question now is whether we continue down the path toward cataclysm, or make a bold break towards a brighter future.”

“These people who are willing to put themselves on the line are real heroes because our leaders do not understand the importance of this,” said James Hansen yesterday about XL Dissent while speaking at the University of Oregon’s Environmental Law Conference. “For them to rule that there’s no environmental impact is pure scientific garbage.”
so they arrested 400 people over a peaceful protest?

what if people protested the NDAA like the Ukrainians did in front of the white house?

Double standards are double standards.
A mysterious giant virus buried for 30,000 years in Siberian permafrost has been resurrected.

The virus only infects single-celled organisms and doesn't closely resemble any known pathogens that harm humans.

Even so, the new discovery raises the possibility that as the climate warms and exploration expands in long-untouched regions of Siberia, humans could release ancient or eradicated viruses. These could include Neanderthal viruses or even smallpox that have lain dormant in the ice for thousands of years.

"There is now a non-zero probability that the pathogenic microbes that bothered [ancient human populations] could be revived, and most likely infect us as well," study co-author Jean-Michel Claverie, a bioinformatics researcher at Aix-Marseille University in France, wrote in an email. "Those pathogens could be banal bacteria (curable with antibiotics) or resistant bacteria or nasty viruses. If they have been extinct for a long time, then our immune system is no longer prepared to respond to them."

(A "non-zero" probability just means the chances of the event happening are not "impossible.")

As the climate warms and sea ice and permafrost melt, oil and mining companies are drilling many formerly off-limit areas in Russia, raising the possibility that ancient human viruses could be released.

For instance, Neanderthals and humans both lived in Siberia as recently as 28,000 years ago, and some of the diseases that plagued both species may still be around.

"If viable virions are still there, this is a good recipe for disaster," Claverie said. "Virions" is the term used for the virus particles when they are in their inert or dormant form.

http://news.yahoo.com/giant-virus-resurr...20390.html

---

gotta love BS academic language. NON-ZERO PROBABILITY. DEEP
My garbage news paper[Image: ypana8ym.jpg]
Edit wrong thread but I'll leave it here also
Michael Cravey Fatally Shot By Cops After Allegedly Stabbing Man On College Campus
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/03...90706.html

[Image: 1900169_640842982654858_1251709389_n.jpg]

michael cravey = thomas brinkley

thomas brinkley ran a popular youtube website investigating the aurora batman shooting. he was an odd dude & he put out some pretty crazy videos. but there was some good info in there @ times.

he later claimed to be @ the center of the entire conspiracy & being gangstalked & threatened b/c of it.

he allegedly stabbed a random stranger around 7 am. fled the scene, crashed & was spotted in a best buy parking lot talking to someone in a car (?) while holding a hatchet. upon leaving the car & heading towards PetsMart, he was approached by a LEO with his weapon drawn. he then charged the LEO with the hatchet raised and was shot dead.
^ That's a pretty bizarre story, not sure what to make of it. Why would he charge a cop with weapons drawn?
(03-06-2014 01:49 PM)GMB13 Wrote: [ -> ]^ That's a pretty bizarre story, not sure what to make of it. Why would he charge a cop with weapons drawn?

yeah. me either, very odd. of course, everyone that knows him says this would be way out of character.

stabbing a random stranger? fled & found 3 hrs later talking to some guy in a parked car in a best buy parking lot?

rushing a LEO wielding a hatchet is a death wish if that is what went down.

add the paranoid youtube videos & its def something that makes you take notice Undecided



Ancient Egyptian Soldier's Letter Home Deciphered

LiveScience.com By By Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor

11 hours ago

A newly deciphered letter home dating back around 1,800 years reveals the pleas of a young Egyptian soldier named Aurelius Polion who was serving, probably as a volunteer, in a Roman legion in Europe.

In the letter, written mainly in Greek, Polion tells his family that he is desperate to hear from them and that he is going to request leave to make the long journey home to see them.

Addressed to his mother (a bread seller), sister and brother, part of it reads: "I pray that you are in good health night and day, and I always make obeisance before all the gods on your behalf. I do not cease writing to you, but you do not have me in mind," it reads. [In Photos: Gladiators of the Roman Empire]

"I am worried about you because although you received letters from me often, you never wrote back to me so that I may know how you ..." (Part of the letter hasn't survived.)

Polion says he has written six letters to his family without response, suggesting some sort of family tensions.

"While away in Pannonia I sent (letters) to you, but you treat me so as a stranger," he writes. "I shall obtain leave from the consular (commander), and I shall come to you so that you may know that I am your brother …"

Found in an ancient Egyptian town

The letter was found outside a temple in the Egyptian town of Tebtunis more than a century ago by an archaeological expedition led by Bernard Grenfell and Arthur Hunt. They found numerous papyri in the town and did not have time to translate all of them.

Recently Grant Adamson, a doctoral candidate at Rice University, took up the task of translating the papyrus, using infrared images of it, a technology that makes part of the text more legible. His translation was published recently in the Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists.

Adamson isn't sure if the soldier's family responded to his pleas, or if Polion got leave to see them (it's unlikely), but it appears this letter did arrive home.

"I tend to think so. The letter was addressed to and mentions Egyptians, and it was found outside the temple of the Roman-period town of Tebtunis in the Fayyum not far from the Nile River," Adamson wrote in an email to Live Science.

Polion, who lived at a time when the Roman Empire controlled Egypt, was part of the legio II Adiutrix legion stationed in Pannonia Inferior (around modern-day Hungary)

He may have volunteered for the pay and food legions got. However, that doesn't mean Polion knew that he was going to be posted so far away from home.

"He may have volunteered and left Egypt without knowing where he would be assigned," writes Adamson in the journal article. According to the translation, Polion sent the letter to a military veteran who could forward it to his family.

An ancient soldier, a modern problem

The situation seen in this letter, a young man serving as a volunteer in a military unit far away from home, facing tensions with his family and seeking leave to see them sounds like something that happens in modern-day armed forces.

Although soldiers today have an easier time communicating and traveling back home (Polion would have had to travel for a month or more to reach Tebtunis from his posting in Europe), there are some themes that connect both ancient and modern soldiers, Adamson said.

"I think that some aspects of military service belong to a common experience across ancient and modern civilizations — part of our human experience in general really. Things like worry and homesickness."

The letter is now in the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley.

http://news.yahoo.com/ancient-egyptian-s...54763.html
Stolen passports raise possibility of terrorism in missing flight
http://edition.cnn.com/2014/03/08/world/...?hpt=hp_t1

Quote:Uncertainly over the fate of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was further compounded Saturday by reports that two men whose names matched those on the passenger manifest had reported their passports stolen.

Malaysian authorities apparently did not check the stolen documents on an international law enforcement agency database, CNN has learned.

After the airline released a manifest of the 239 people on the plane, Austria denied that one of its citizens was on the flight as the list had stated. The Austrian citizen was safe and sound, and his passport had been stolen two years ago, Austrian Foreign Ministry spokesman Martin Weiss said.

Similarly, Italy's foreign ministry confirmed that no Italians were on the flight, even though an Italian was listed on the manifest. Malaysian officials said they were aware of reports that the Italian's passport was also stolen but had not confirmed it.

Quote:U.S. law enforcement sources, however, told CNN they've been told that both documents were stolen in Thailand. Still, the missing passports raised concerns about the possibility of terrorism.

A law enforcement official Saturday told CNN that various U.S. government agencies were briefed about the passports. The names of the persons whose passports were stolen have been circulated and checked, the official said. There's nothing at this point to indicate foul play on their part.

As of Saturday afternoon, the FBI had not deployed investigators to look into whether the plane disappeared as a result of a criminal act and had not been asked to do so by Malaysia, a U.S. official told CNN. In the event of a criminal act, the FBI would deploy a team because there were Americans aboard the flight.

Terrorism has not been ruled out, especially because the plane has not been located, the official said.





Quote:No one is sure what happened to the plane. Air traffic controllers lost track of it after it left Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, on its way to Beijing on Friday. The plane was two hours into its flight, cruising during what experts consider to be the safest part of the journey, when it vanished.

"Whatever happened, happened very quickly. For them to have lost two-way radio communication with (air traffic control), two-way radio communication with the company, and to lose any kind of radar data with ground control facilities means that the airplane was compromised in a very quick manner and it may have been well beyond the control of the crew to keep the airplane under control and make any kind of emergency distress call or emergency landing."
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-26503141

Mystery shrouds the fate of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which has disappeared with 239 passengers and crew en route to Beijing.

There were 227 passengers, including 153 Chinese and 38 Malaysians, according to the manifest. Two were children. All 12 crew members were Malaysian.

Among the Chinese nationals were a delegation of 19 artists who had attended an exhibition in Kuala Lumpur.

Two male passengers were travelling on passports stolen from an Austrian and an Italian in Thailand in 2012 and 2013 respectively, Interpol said in a statement. The two passengers were en route to Europe via Beijing.

Flight MH370 departed from Kuala Lumpur International Airport at 00:41 on Saturday (16:41 GMT Friday), and was due to arrive in Beijing at 06:30. Air traffic controllers lost contact at 01:30.

When was the last contact made?
At a time as yet undisclosed, a relative reportedly managed to call one of the passengers, who was carrying a Singapore phone. Malaysia Airlines has repeatedly tried to call the same number but no ringtone has been heard.

Where did the jet disappear?
It was flying over the South China Sea, south of Vietnam's Ca Mau peninsula. The normal route would have taken it over Cambodia and Vietnam before entering Chinese airspace.

No distress signal or message was sent but it is believed the plane attempted to turn back from its scheduled path, perhaps towards Kuala Lumpur Airport.

Have any traces of the plane been found?
A Malaysian Maritime Enforcement boat searching off north-east Malaysia
No wreckage has been confirmed.

However, an unnamed official from Vietnam's national committee for search and rescue told AFP news agency: "We received information from a Vietnamese plane saying that they found two broken objects, which seem like those of an aircraft, located about 50 miles [80km] to the south-west of Tho Chu Island."

Ships have been sent to check in daylight.

Both waters to the east of Malaysia, in the South China Sea, and in the Straits of Malacca, along Malaysia's west coast, are being searched.

What are the theories for a crash?
Common factors in plane crashes are poor weather, pilot error and airworthiness.

Weather conditions on this flight are said to have been good and the pilot, 53, who had more than 18,000 flying hours behind him, had been employed by the airline since 1981.

Malaysia Airlines has a good safety record and the jet, a Boeing 777-200, is said to be one of the safest because of its modern technology. One of the plane's wingtips was clipped in an incident while taxiing in 2012 but it was repaired and certified as safe.

David Learmount, Flight Global's operations and safety editor, told BBC News: "Today's aeroplanes are incredibly reliable and you do not get some sudden structural failure in flight. It just doesn't happen. It just won't happen."

Could it have been a terrorist attack?
The airline says it is not ruling out any theory while officials in the US, which is sending FBI investigators, say there is no evidence of such an attack yet.

The presence of two passengers with stolen passports is a breach of security but could relate to illegal migration.

When an Air India plane crashed in Mangalore in 2010 en route from Dubai, with the loss of 158 lives, as many 10 fraudulent passports were recovered.

Can a modern jet just vanish without trace?
An Air France jet flying from Brazil to France vanished into the Atlantic Ocean on 1 June 2009, with the loss of all 228 people on board.

Debris was spotted the following day but it took nearly two years to locate the flight recorders and remains of the fuselage, deep on the ocean floor. The waters off Vietnam and in the Malacca straits are much shallower.

Flight recorders, or "black boxes" as they are often known, emit ultrasonic signals that can be detected underwater. Under good conditions, the signals can be detected from several hundred miles away.

But without knowing the trajectory of a plane as it went down or fully understanding wind and wave conditions if it crashed into water, searchers sometimes end up criss-crossing huge areas looking for relatively small pieces of wreckage, the Wall Street Journal notes in a things-to-know piece.
Reference URL's