Evil Academy

Full Version: News & Current Events
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Rumors of the NWO's demise continue to be greatly exaggerated, as NWO candidate Terry McAuliffe wins the governor's race in Virginia.

http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/te...html?hp=t1

"Mike Bloomberg’s super PAC spent $2 million in the final two weeks on ads boosting gun control, for example."
Re McAuliffe, see also:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virg...story.html

"Some Latinos who turned out to vote in the Northern Virginia suburbs on Tuesday said they were supporting Democrat Terry McAuliffe for governor because they believed his opponent is anti-immigrant."
Journalist: "Why did you vote for McAuliffe?"

North Virginian Latino Dupe: "I believe his opponent is anti-immigrant. It said so on the television."
(11-02-2013 09:35 AM)superCalo Wrote: [ -> ]I am shocked that with so many guns around designed for one specific purpose, to shoot & kill other humans that folk actually use them as such, who would have thought.

You know what though? Those things are so fucking fun!

The bigger the better and more awesome!

Just ask America. Boys with toys.
Nokia and Samsung say they can’t track powered-down phones despite NSA claims

The Washington Post claimed that the National Security Agency (NSA) had developed a method nine years ago to locate cellphones when they were powered down. The publication didn’t provide technical details on the software or hardware involved, leaving security researchers puzzled by the revelations. Seeking clarification on the technologies invoked, British privacy watchdog Privacy International conducted a survey of eight cellphone manufacturers in August to obtain details on how it would be possible to track a cellphone once it’s turned off.
Half of the firms involved in Privacy International’s research have responded, but none of the companies have provided a clear explanation for The Washington Post’s claims. Google, one of four companies to respond, rejects the idea that it could control Android handsets that are powered down. “When a mobile device running the Android Operating System is powered off, there is no part of the Operating System that remains on or emits a signal,” explains a Google spokesperson to Privacy International. “Google has no way to turn on a device remotely.” Similarly, Samsung seems unaware of how an NSA process could track cellphones that are not powered on. “Without the power source it is not possible to transmit any signal, due to the components being inactive,” says Samsung vice president Hyunjoon Kim.
Hawaii lives up to it's license plate, signs same sex marriage Bill into law:

[Image: hi2009.jpg]
(11-07-2013 08:40 AM)Roland Bates Wrote: [ -> ]Rumors of the NWO's demise continue to be greatly exaggerated, as NWO candidate Terry McAuliffe wins the governor's race in Virginia.

http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/te...html?hp=t1

"Mike Bloomberg’s super PAC spent $2 million in the final two weeks on ads boosting gun control, for example."


Ken Cuccinelli wanted to outlaw oral and anal sex. This sort of lunacy is why no one votes for the GOP these days.
Knights of Malta! Well, citizens, anyway. Smile

http://www.smh.com.au/world/malta-to-sel...z2kXeV2KI3

"Malta's parliament has approved selling citizenship of the Mediterranean island for €650,000 ($939,000) for each non-European Union applicant.

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat said the program was meant to bring in revenue to the country while attracting "high value" people who could potentially invest in the island.

He estimated the scheme would earn the government €30 million ($43 million) in its first year - meaning that about 45 people would be sold citizenship, which would also give them work and residency rights in the rest of the 28-member bloc.

Malta is a member of the European Union, a member of the Schengen border-less travel area and has a visa waiver agreement with the United States.

Eric Major, the CEO of Henley and Partners, the international group that will administer the scheme, told the Maltese media that between 200 and 300 individuals were expected to apply every year.

"This will be an open and transparent program," he said.

The opposition Nationalist Party has strongly opposed the scheme, complaining that it is not linked to residence or investment. Opposition leader Simon Busuttil warned in parliament that Malta could end up being compared to tax haven countries in the Caribbean.

Mr Busuttil said his party was not ruling out a proposal to collect signatures to try to force a referendum on the scheme.

The government insists applicants will be vetted and that people connected to crime will not be accepted. It says other EU countries are considering similar schemes.

A small protest was held outside parliament during the vote, with the demonstrators calling for citizenship to be linked to substantial investment, rather than just being sold.

Malta, along with Italy and Greece, has borne much of the brunt of the EU's two-decade immigration crisis, with gangs smuggling poor migrants from Africa to its shores in rickety boats to seek a new life in the European Union."
(11-14-2013 08:27 AM)Roland Bates Wrote: [ -> ]Knights of Malta! Well, citizens, anyway. :)

http://www.smh.com.au/world/malta-to-sel...z2kXeV2KI3

"Malta's parliament has approved selling citizenship of the Mediterranean island for €650,000 ($939,000) for each non-European Union applicant.

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat said the program was meant to bring in revenue to the country while attracting "high value" people who could potentially invest in the island.

He estimated the scheme would earn the government €30 million ($43 million) in its first year - meaning that about 45 people would be sold citizenship, which would also give them work and residency rights in the rest of the 28-member bloc.

Malta is a member of the European Union, a member of the Schengen border-less travel area and has a visa waiver agreement with the United States.

Eric Major, the CEO of Henley and Partners, the international group that will administer the scheme, told the Maltese media that between 200 and 300 individuals were expected to apply every year.

"This will be an open and transparent program," he said.

The opposition Nationalist Party has strongly opposed the scheme, complaining that it is not linked to residence or investment. Opposition leader Simon Busuttil warned in parliament that Malta could end up being compared to tax haven countries in the Caribbean.

Mr Busuttil said his party was not ruling out a proposal to collect signatures to try to force a referendum on the scheme.

The government insists applicants will be vetted and that people connected to crime will not be accepted. It says other EU countries are considering similar schemes.

A small protest was held outside parliament during the vote, with the demonstrators calling for citizenship to be linked to substantial investment, rather than just being sold.

Malta, along with Italy and Greece, has borne much of the brunt of the EU's two-decade immigration crisis, with gangs smuggling poor migrants from Africa to its shores in rickety boats to seek a new life in the European Union."

over priced

Sent from my SCH-S720C using Tapatalk 2
South Korea's Debt Culture.

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/201...-education

"Over the course of two decades, South Korea quickly morphed from a country of savers to a nation of spenders and borrowers. The country now hold the most credit cards per capita in the world, according to statistics from the Bank of Korea, with five times as many credit cards as people.

Young-Sik Jeong, an economist based in Seoul who tracks household debt, found that Koreans in 1990 saved on average 22.2 percent of their net household incomes. By 2012, that figure had dropped to 3.4 percent. And the ratio of household debt to disposable income in 2012 was 160—higher than the U.S. in 2007 before the housing bubble burst.

While Seoul is the home of “Gangnam Style,” named for the upscale, status-obsessed district parodied in singer Psy’s hit song, and a mecca for plastic surgery in Asia, the rise of conspicuous consumerism doesn’t fully explain how Koreans’ financial habits changed so quickly.

Jeong estimates that mortgage loans account for roughly two-thirds of Korean household debt, and high housing costs mean loans run staggeringly large. Data collected by the McKinsey Global Institute show that the average home price in Korea is 7.7 times the average income; in the U.S., that ratio is 3.5. Meanwhile, borrowing for education-related expenses—such as elite after-school tutors and college tuition—also accounts for a significant portion of household debt. In other words, Koreans’ meritocratic aspirations help fuel heavy spending.

“It’s not just about keeping up with the Kims. It’s about not being left behind; that’s a real anxiety point in a fast-moving society,” says Tom Coyner of Soft Landing Consulting in Seoul, a business consulting firm. “The whole Korean economy works on the principle of being overleveraged. From the outside, it looks like [a] giant Ponzi scheme, but it’s manageable as long as the Korean economy keeps plugging forward. If you’re not overleveraged, there’s a massive fear that someone else will invest more and you’ll be left behind.”

The debt boom is possible because credit is now readily available. “It was very difficult for households to borrow money in the 1990s,” says Jeong. “Financial institutions preferred to lend money to corporate interests.” Now it’s much easier for families to get bank loans and multiple credit cards. “About a decade ago, when credit cards first became widely available, you had people literally on the sidewalk with folding tables and credit card application forms,” remembers Coyner. “And people started to use them as responsibly as college freshman.”

The slowing of the Korean economy over the past two decades has made it more difficult for middle-class families to save. In the mid 1990s, before the 1997 Asian financial crash, real income growth hovered around 6 percent or 7 percent. After a few rough years, income growth recovered to nearly the same level by the early 2000s. But for three of the past five years, real income growth has been negative. And unemployment has been creeping up. “The young generation has a lot of difficulty finding good jobs,” says Sarah Kim, a reporter for the JoongAng Daily in Seoul. “School and work are so competitive now because there’s less job security and not enough good slots for everyone.”

And the global implications of South Korea’s new debt culture? “It’s a concern, but not a major concern right now,” Coyner warns. “But it could prove to be a very weak corner of the country’s foundation in the event of another global financial trauma."
^^^

This is going to blow up on us big time.

I already know two childhood acquaintances who have attempted suicide over debt issues.



Sent from my Samsuck Clone S3 using Crapatalk
i know at least 2 koreans who are in deep shit over debt.

they've adopted the US model.

Chinese and Japanese are still savers.

Korea is the new NWO darling of the east.

very sad.
whenever you have a massive debt based consumer culture.. it will be coupled with raunchy entertainment.

so it is with Kpop
Former heads of state call on EU to set up state surveillance of ‘intolerant’ citizens

ROME, October 16, 2013 (LifeSiteNews.com) – A council of former heads of state and government leaders has called on the European Union to establish national surveillance units to monitor citizens of all 27 EU member states suspected of “intolerance”.

The European Council on Tolerance and Reconciliation (ECTR), a “tolerance watchdog” launched under the leadership of former Polish president Aleksander Kwasniewski and Moshe Kantor, President of the European Jewish Congress, called for the establishment of government surveillance bodies to directly monitor the “intolerant” behavior of identified citizens and groups.

The council, which includes former presidents of the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Albania, Latvia, and Cyprus, and former prime ministers of Spain and Sweden, made the proposal in a report delivered during a 45-minute speech to the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties (LIBE).

These “special administrative units,” the report says, “should preferably operate within the Ministry of Justice.”

“There is no need to be tolerant to the intolerant,” it states, especially “as far as freedom of expression is concerned.”
Intolerant of what?
Reference URL's