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Full Version: ATTENTION: Megatherium...is this really big news in Canada???!!!
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I have been long fascinated about this ever since the three members of this expedition were exhumed and examined by Dr. Owen Beattie in 1982. Even though they had been dead 134 years, their bodies were perfectly preserved in their permafrost graves. I've read books, online articles and seen plenty of online videos on how 129 British sailors, on two well-fitted ships with the most advanced technology of their time, made what-the British Admiralty thought-would be the final and successful sailing of the Northwest Passage starting in 1845 and hoped for a a return in 1848). The two ships disappeared and none of the 129 ever returned alive. A dozen or more searches by ship and overland were made in the decade and half after, with even more deaths resulting with very little information gathered.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/10...95154.html

Lost Ship From Doomed Franklin Expedition Discovered In The Arctic

TORONTO (AP) — One of two British explorer ships that vanished in the Arctic nearly 170 years ago during a search for the fabled Northwest Passage has been found, Canada's prime minister announced Tuesday in a discovery that could unlock one of history's biggest mysteries and swell Canadian pride.

Last seen in the 1840s while under the command of Rear Adm. Sir John Franklin, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror have long been among the most sought-after prizes in marine archaeology and the subject of songs, poems and novels.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's office said the well-preserved wreck of one of the vessels was found Sunday with the help of a remotely operated underwater vehicle. It was 11 meters (yards) below the surface, near King William Island, about 1,200 miles northwest of Toronto.

Harper said that it is unclear which ship it is, but that sonar images yielded enough information to confirm it was one of Franklin's.

"This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers, so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country."

Harper said the discovery would shed light on what happened to Franklin's crew.

Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men disappeared after setting out in 1845 for the Northwest Passage, the long-sought shortcut to Asia that supposedly ran from the Atlantic to the Pacific by way of the harsh, ice-choked Arctic.

Historians believe the ships were lost in 1848 after they became locked in the ice near King William Island and the crews abandoned them in a hopeless bid to reach safety. Inuit lore tells of "white men who were starving" as late as the winter of 1850 on the Royal Geographical Society Island.

For many years afterward, Franklin was celebrated as a Victorian-era hero.

Dozens of searches by the British and Americans in the 1800s failed to locate the wrecks, and some of those expeditions ended in tragedy, too. But they opened up parts of the Canadian Arctic to discovery and ultimately spied a Northwest Passage, though it proved inhospitable to shipping because of ice and treacherous weather.

Canada announced in 2008 that it would look for the ships, and Harper's government has poured millions into the venture, with the prime minister himself taking part in the search.

Harper's government made the project a top priority as it looked to assert Canada's sovereignty over the Northwest Passage, where melting Arctic ice in recent years has unlocked the very shipping route Franklin was after.

Canada says it owns the passage. The U.S. and others say it is international territory.

Ryan Harris, an underwater archaeologist helping to lead the Parks Canada search, said a sonar image shows some of the ship's deck structures, including the main mast, which was sheared off by the ice when the vessel sank. He said the contents of the ship are most likely in the same good condition.

The next step is to send divers to explore the ship and any artifacts. There is no current plan to raise it. Divers will see what kind of condition the hull is in. The exact location of the wreck was not disclosed for fear of looters.

The discovery came shortly after a coast guard helicopter pilot spotted a dark, U-shaped object in the Arctic snow. The orange-brown hunk of metal bore the markings of the Royal Navy. It was a davit — part of a lifting mechanism, likely for a lifeboat, for one of the two lost Franklin ships, the search team said.

"That's the clue that tells you: Look here. That's the flag," said John Geiger, president of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Geiger was with the search team.

Andrew Campbell, a vice president at Parks Canada, said a combination of previous Inuit testimony, past modeling of ice patterns by the Canadian Ice Service, and the measurements of the two lost vessels — they are so similar they can't yet be told apart — convinced the searchers that this was a Franklin ship.

When the search team telephoned Campbell in Ottawa with the news early Sunday, "they cried, I cried. It was quite a moment," he said.

Queen Elizabeth II issued a statement saying she was "greatly interested to learn of the discovery of one of the long-lost ships of Captain Sir John Franklin" and she congratulated "all those who played a part in this historic achievement."

Other tantalizing traces have been found over the years, including the bodies of three crewmen discovered in the 1980s. Among them was a petty officer whose perfectly preserved remains were in an ice-filled coffin.

The search for an Arctic passage to Asia frustrated explorers for centuries, beginning with John Cabot's voyage in 1497. The shortcut eluded other famous explorers, including Henry Hudson and Francis Drake.

No sea crossing was successful until Roald Amundsen of Norway completed his trip in 1903-06.
From what has been gathered by the evidence that was discovered, the two ships were trapped in ice in 1846-1847 and permanently in 1847-1848 with he ships being abandoned in April 1848 and the survivors (a note written by the captains of the two ships explaining their situation and that 9 officers and 15 men had already died by then, including expedition leader Sir John Franklin). would try to walk over 800 miles, dragging several boats on sledges to try to get to a place where they could use the boats to sail to a Hudson's Bay trading post.

Here's the note (initially written in May 1847 by one of officers who was leading a small party of survey and then the April 1848 final note by Captains Crozier and Fitzjames, by which time the writer of the first note "All well" Lt. Gore had died):

[Image: e5ce0b4343.jpg]

First message:

28 of May 1847 H.M.Ships Erebus and Terror Wintered in the Ice in Lat. 70°5'N Long. 98°.23'W Having wintered in 1846-7 at Beechey Island in Lat 74°43'28"N Long 91°39'15"W After having ascended Wellington Channel to Lat 77° and returned by the West side of Cornwallis Island. Sir John Franklin commanding the Expedition. All well

Party consisting of 2 Officers and 6 Men left the ships on Monday 24th May 1847.—Gm. Gore, Lieut., Chas. F. DesVoeux, Mate


Second message:

25th April 1848 HMS ships Terror and Erebus were deserted on the 22nd April 5 leagues NNW of this having been beset since 12th Sept 1846. The officers and crews consisting of 105 souls under the command of Captain F. R. M. Crozier landed here—in Lat. 69°37'42" Long. 98°41' This paper was found by Lt. Irving under the cairn supposed to have been built by Sir James Ross in 1831—4 miles to the Northward—where it had been deposited by the late Commander Gore in May 1847. Sir James Ross' pillar has not however been found and the paper has been transferred to this position which is that in which Sir J. Ross' pillar was erected—Sir John Franklin died on the 11th of June 1847 and the total loss by deaths in the Expedition has been to this date 9 officers and 15 men.—James Fitzjames Captain HMS Erebus F. R. M. Crozier Captain & Senior Offr And start on tomorrow 26th for Backs Fish River
Albeit an interesting story, this isn't for nostalgia or even the integrity to put the family at peace, this is the Harper government focusing on the north as a shill for corporate oil extraction. Trying to pass this off as added integrity to the history of the north, to consider claim to the arctic circle, though this ship was found 200 miles beyond the Arctic circle, and 500 miles from the north pole.

Harper is such an obvious cunt, he has gutted science and environmental government positions and has opened the countries resources for any other company or country as open tender. This interest he has in this search is to line his geeky pockets, what a shit stain
Harper is a Rockafeller stooge. He sold this country down the shitter. Sad

This isn't "big" news, barely a side note.
I'm kind of out of the loop, but I suppose it is big news up here BA. I'm familiar with the story, but more so with the composer of the epic tribute song, the heroic and late great Mr Stan Rogers.

I know this is a favorite of BA's:



agreed harper is a cunt of the highest order.

plus this isnt news here

not that I

like, watch the news or anything.


I would have to ask someone i know if they did, and if they did, they probably wouldnt tell me because im drunk but fuck you.
And yes, as my fellow Canadians what, Evil Master and canuckster have pointed out, Mr Harper is not very popular in Canada these days.

Though I do share his appetite for Canadian history, especially BC history.
how he got elected is a fucking mystery.
Well, the opposition splitting the center/left vote three or four ways in every riding didn't help.

And it won't help again next year!
(09-15-2014 11:28 AM)Megatherium Wrote: [ -> ]I'm kind of out of the loop, but I suppose it is big news up here BA. I'm familiar with the story, but more so with the composer of the epic tribute song, the heroic and late great Mr Stan Rogers.

I know this is a favorite of BA's:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKsLZRndbtw
yes definitely one of my favorite songs, Stan Roger's "Northwest Passage" which i also believe is the unofficial anthem of Canada...the remarks on this Youtube video are rife with the news of the found Franklin ship. What i didn't know was that it was were the Inuits said it was. The Inuits were interviewed by the searchers in the 1850s but their testimony were ignored due to the cannibalism testimony.

Looks like, with the discovery of one the ships, the search is on for "...the hand of Franklin reaching for the Beaufort Sea tracing one warm line through a land so wild and savage..."



Damn, right where the Inuit said it was eh. And how could there NOT be any cannibalism, given the circumstances.

They probably wanted to believe the Inuit ate them.
Sailors have the Custom of the Sea, one of those being if shipwrecked, those present could draw lots to kill and eat the one who draws the "short straw" so that the others can live. So cannibalism was always in the back of the minds of professional seamen. It was Victorian sensibilities in those days that didn't want to hear the Inuit reports of cannibalism.
(09-15-2014 07:26 AM)ba_dass Wrote: [ -> ]Dozens of searches by the British and Americans in the 1800s failed to locate the wrecks, and some of those expeditions ended in tragedy, too. But they opened up parts of the Canadian Arctic to discovery and ultimately spied a Northwest Passage, though it proved inhospitable to shipping because of ice and treacherous weather.

...
No sea crossing was successful until Roald Amundsen of Norway completed his trip in 1903-06.

It's not only the ice, but also how shallow it is. Roald got stuck himself in ice and had to camp there for about a year. However, even Roald only used a boat that was about the size of a fishing boat. It had 12 people on it. It was bigger than a regular fishing boat, but smaller than I imagine a schooner to be. It was basically a small schooner. The water itself is too shallow at the shallowest part of the Passage for a big vessel.

The point of having the Northwest Passage was to have a route to Asia for trade. But with such a shallow depth and the area being locked in ice for a year occasionally, it was not practical.
This is his boat, the Gjoa, and since it only has one mast, it's too small to even be considered a schooner:
[Image: Med_Gjoa%20sailing1.jpg]

Can you imagine Europe's trade with Asia being conducted in boats of that size?

It was basically impractical for the purpose.
It counts as a "sloop".

[Image: 628x471.jpg]
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