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Full Version: How Russian President Vladimir Putin Changed One MMA Fighter's Life
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Almost sounded too good to be true, like a version of the Nigerian email scam???!!!

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/19902...president-

Anthony Ruiz's crooked face brought forth a smile and some timely advice from Vladimir Putin.

Eighteen months before the world visited Sochi for a slushy Olympic march inside the ring of steel, the Russian president joined friends at the seaside resort for a sports festival featuring one of his favorites: mixed martial arts.

The longtime judo player, a black belt who penned a book and starred in a DVD touting the grappling art, Putin is said to be especially enamored with combat sports because of what they reveal about people.

In recent years, Putin famously sat ringside in Moscow and Saint Petersburg paying respects to ethnic Russian heavyweight icon Fedor Emelianenko. Neither of those bouts, however, provided the former KGB officer a chance to see the mettle of a man.

Alexei Nikolsky/Associated Press
Ruiz's status, of course, can’t touch Emelianenko's, though he has earned a reputation during his 50-fight journey. Before meeting Alexander Shlemenko in Russia two summers ago, Ruiz competed exclusively in his home state of California for basically any MMA promoter operating there not named “UFC.”

If you saw him fight, you quickly realized he didn’t mind taking a beating. In Sochi, at the age of 34, for a $6,000 purse, Ruiz, of Coarsegold, Calif., endured his worst one yet.

Three days before the bout, ignorant of Russian people, promoters and customs, the man known as “A Train” arrived in a place seemingly incompatible with winter sports.

None of Ruiz's training partners or coaches owned a passport, so he brought along a friend who did. They navigated around town as best as they could, essentially succumbing to charades to communicate with the locals. When Ruiz wanted to find a place to swim, he took his nose between a couple of fingers and pretended to jump into the deep end of a pool. Another time, craving a steak, he actually stooped to mooing.

Ruiz eventually found a workable translation app for his phone that helped with the basics, yet on fight night it proved less than useful. As the only English speaker on the card he felt uncomfortable, in part, because of concerns about the rules. Ruiz had grown accustomed to competing under California State Athletic Commission regulation.

There wasn’t anything similar in Sochi, he said.

The American middleweight could have wrapped his hands however he wanted, he thought. Or used whatever drugs he wished—which in a way made sense considering the venue’s makeshift backstage, with its large beds and lounge chairs, seemed suited for that sort of thing.

The area along the coast of the Black Sea was muggy. Tropical even. It was damp enough so grass appeared green without being watered.

"Almost somewhere I'd take my wife," Ruiz said. "It was pretty bad ass."

To his chagrin, so was Shelmenko, who "hit me probably a thousand times," tallied Ruiz. "My nose was broken all the way to the side in the last round. It was brutal."

Alexei Zhernakov, Shlemenko's manager and matchmaker for the evening’s promoter, League S-70, described Ruiz's night like this: "He got the crap beat out of him."


The outgunned American was put down on several occasions, the first just three minutes after the opening bell. Said Shlemenko: “There were a couple times when I knocked him down and could have kept pounding him, but I didn't do it. I allowed him to stand. I didn't take advantage of it.

“Putin was right to tell me I fought nobly—I didn't want to kill Ruiz in the ring."

Shlemenko called Ruiz's multiple recoveries a "mystery."

Putin thought enough of the American's resilience and courage to offer a standing ovation, kind words and significantly more.

Immediately after the fight, with the tone of one friend telling another they have food stuck between their teeth, the Russian president offered this advice in English.

Said Putin: “You need to fix your nose.”

Inside the ring, minus the fun of charades, Ruiz clasped his nose between his fingers and rearranged tangled cartilage from a chicane to a straightaway. Just one more battle along the way, he thought.

Two weeks after returning home, mostly recovered by then, Ruiz’s phone rang. The voice on the other end spoke English, although it was obvious this was an intermediary for a Russian party who could be overheard in the background.

From Ruiz Facebook Page
Picture of Ruiz
Ruiz was asked about his health.

Did he need anything?

He was fine, he said.

Then he was asked for a SWIFT code—the standard format for transferring money between banks, especially internationally. Ruiz didn't have a clue. He visited his bank to inquire why anyone would want to know such a thing.

Two days later, after deciding to play along, $50,000 was wired into his account from the Russian Federation.

Understandably, Ruiz freaked out. He checked with his financial institution and was told, indeed, it’s real money and, better yet, his to keep.

"I couldn't believe it," he recalled. "Then the next day, boom, another $50,000."

For all Ruiz knew, a third wire transfer, also to the tune of $50,000, represented the number of times Shlemenko buried him in Sochi.

“The bank was telling me there's some people who aren't all that straight doing transfers and stuff like that,” he said. “I also knew it was coming from Putin, and he's one of the wealthiest persons in the world. So, really, $150,000 ain't that much to him. That's what I'm telling myself to justify it. Sure enough, I kept it in there and left it alone. It was real. It really happened.”

He couldn’t be blamed for pulling up his balance from bed at 6 a.m. the next morning, but that was it, the transfers ended, leaving the middleweight’s family and friends ecstatic, in disbelief and frightened.

When they asked how in the world this could happen, Ruiz answered as best as he could: “Well, I offered my life. I was there. I was willing to die. And it showed on film."

He’s never been rich, or close to rich. So a hundred-fifty grand in three days thanks to Vladimir Putin? This was life-altering stuff. Ruiz purchased a home and paid down debt. But because the transactions appeared tied to the Russian government, there was some thought that the money carried with it an added element of danger. Zhernokov claimed the $150,000 belonged to sponsors operating on behalf of Putin, “our special guest,” not the Kremlin directly.

When word leaked about Ruiz’s good fortune against Shlemenko—Bellator’s current middleweight champion, who to this day is bothered that he didn’t receive a piece of the Putin performance bonus—Zhernakov told fighters that what went down in Sochi was a “once a century” moment.

Ruiz recently returned to Russia to fight in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, which is situated on the opposite side of the nine-time-zone nation from Sochi. With Putin attempting to annex Crimea from Ukraine, the Russian president wasn't able to watch Ruiz win a decision over unknown Ramazan Mukailov.

"I would think that I'm not going to get that lucky twice," Ruiz said, "but you never know."
From Wikipedia:

Personal wealth and residences

Putin arrived at the 14th International Biker Rally in Sevastopol, Crimea, July 24, 2010
Figures released during the legislative election of 2007 put Putin's wealth at approximately 3.7 million rubles ($150,000 USD) in bank accounts, a private 77.4-square-meter (833 sq ft) apartment in Saint Petersburg, 260 shares of Bank Saint Petersburg (with a December 2007 market price $5.36 per share[311]) and two 1960s-era Volga M21 cars that he inherited from his father and does not register for on-road use. In 2012 Putin reported an income of 3.6 million rubles ($113,000). This has led opponents, such as politician Boris Nemtsov, to question how Putin can afford certain possessions, such as his 11 luxury watches worth an estimated $700,000.[312]

"Putin's Palace" allegedly built for him[313]
Putin's purported 2006 income totalled 2 million rubles (approximately $80,000).[314] According to the data Putin did not make it into the 100 wealthiest Duma candidates of his own United Russia party.[315]
Unconfirmed claims by some Russian opposition politicians and journalists allege that Putin secretly possesses a large fortune (as much as $70 billion[316]) via successive ownership of stakes in a number of Russian companies.[317][318] Nina L. Khrushcheva of the The New School estimates his net worth to be between $40–70 billion.[319] Asked at a press conference on 14 February 2008 whether he was the richest person in Europe, as some newspapers claimed; and if so, to state the source of his wealth, Putin said "This is plain chatter, not worthy discussion, plain bosh. They have picked this in their noses and have smeared this across their pieces of paper. This is how I view this."[320]
Not long after he returned from his KGB service in Dresden, East Germany Putin built a dacha in Solovyovka on the eastern shore of Lake Komsomolskoye on the Karelian Isthmus in Priozersky District of Leningrad Oblast, near St. Petersburg. The dacha had burned down in 1996. Putin built a new one identical to the original and was joined by a group of seven friends who built dachas beside his. In the fall of 1996, the group formally registered their fraternity as co-operative society, calling it Ozero (Lake) and turning it into a gated community.[321]
As President and then Prime-Minister, apart from the Moscow Kremlin and the White House, Putin has used numerous official residences throughout the country. In August 2012 Nemtsov listed 20 villas and palaces, 9 of which were built during Putin's 12 years in power. This compares to the President of the United States' 2 official residences.[322] Some of the residences include: Gorki-9 near Moscow, Bocharov Ruchey in Sochi, Dolgiye Borody in Novgorod Oblast, Novo-Ogaryovo in Moscow Oblast and Riviera in Sochi (the latter two were left for Putin when he was Prime-Minister in 2008–2012, others were used by Dmitry Medvedev at that period).[323] Furthermore, a massive Italianate-style mansion costing an alleged USD 1 billion[313] and dubbed "Putin's Palace" is under construction near the Black Sea village of Praskoveevka. The mansion, built on government land and sporting 3 helipads, a private road paid for from state funds and guarded by officials wearing uniforms of the official Kremlin guard service, is said to have been built for Putin's private use. In 2012 Sergei Kolesnikov, a former business associate of Putin's, told the BBC's Newsnight programme, that he had been ordered by deputy prime minister, Igor Sechin, to oversee the building of it.[324]
What a corrupt little shit

Love to get this closet phaggot on the mats and tear up fake purchased rank. 6 deg black my ass


Sent from my iPhone using Made up Hand Signs
If you ever come to Tland I want to spar with you What. Kyokoshin and Judo are your bases right?
I have read that it is mostly Putin's detractors who place his wealth at $70 billion. Putin himself has called the figure nonsense, however it wouldn't surprise me if his wealth was somewhere in that ballpark.
(03-13-2014 09:22 PM)Som-Pong Wrote: [ -> ]If you ever come to Tland I want to spar with you What. Kyokoshin and Judo are your bases right?

Yeah brother. Love to go to thailand and I think weed get along real well.

I really don't trust or like Putin. I am a committed Judoka and by movement, gestures and posture on the mat and off, Putin is a lowly brown. I have been lately training 14-15 year olds that would consume and swallow his ass on the mats, that is my professional opinion.

It annoys the shit out of me how accredited he is, both athletically politically and emotionally yet what I see is a front. There is no integrity to pronounce yourself as one thing and truly display another. Ok he is a judoka but tone down what you think others, don't have better discretion of. I wonder how stupid some of his adviser are then I lower my bar for societies measure.

Yeah I can't stand this fucker, option B
I would pay big money to see what and Putin throw bones at each other.

Could you imagine?
Observe Item A then observe item B. Notice foot stability and movement, the movements should be precise and conservative, the instructors here are displaying this ability. I don't know whether it is Putin talking the narrative, I guess that is why the horseshit title.

One of my best instructors told me once to notice eyes, always when you walk on the mat for fighting starts and ends with eye contact, to confirm an adversary and then ultimately to confirm you have finished them. WHen practicing judo sure have fun, when displaying your talents or teaching be on fucking point.





Item B: watch putins skipping, his fighty eye contact and his lackadaisical dance like foot movement after the throws. Thos belies a fraud of a BB and poor display of the practice





Ask away guys, I can elaborate but can't find much for this fruit loops videos, there are very little on the internets. Why? lolololol because he sucks
yeah got balance Putin? you fucking fraud. I think he is actually a dancer that learned some judo

He displays some of the absolute worst kuzushi I have ever seen
(03-13-2014 10:26 PM)Winnson Wrote: [ -> ]I would pay big money to see what and Putin throw bones at each other.

Could you imagine?

That would be worth a trip to BKK. next CNY?
If they're not killing each other again
(03-13-2014 09:36 PM)johan Wrote: [ -> ]I have read that it is mostly Putin's detractors who place his wealth at $70 billion. Putin himself has called the figure nonsense, however it wouldn't surprise me if his wealth was somewhere in that ballpark.

This figure probably includes the full value of industries in which he owns a share of the action.
(03-13-2014 10:25 PM)what Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-13-2014 09:22 PM)Som-Pong Wrote: [ -> ]If you ever come to Tland I want to spar with you What. Kyokoshin and Judo are your bases right?

Yeah brother. Love to go to thailand and I think weed get along real well.

I really don't trust or like Putin. I am a committed Judoka and by movement, gestures and posture on the mat and off, Putin is a lowly brown. I have been lately training 14-15 year olds that would consume and swallow his ass on the mats, that is my professional opinion.

It annoys the shit out of me how accredited he is, both athletically politically and emotionally yet what I see is a front. There is no integrity to pronounce yourself as one thing and truly display another. Ok he is a judoka but tone down what you think others, don't have better discretion of. I wonder how stupid some of his adviser are then I lower my bar for societies measure.

Yeah I can't stand this fucker, option B

He has some skills. He is not a yellow belt.

Klitschko is of course a master boxer, however a good analysis I read said Tyson would win. Tyson would be one of the best fighters in the whole world.
(03-13-2014 09:36 PM)johan Wrote: [ -> ]I have read that it is mostly Putin's detractors who place his wealth at $70 billion. Putin himself has called the figure nonsense, however it wouldn't surprise me if his wealth was somewhere in that ballpark.

no proof of the 70 billion dollar claim. Not even smoke.
This does sound too good to be true???!!! Unless I see some solid proof on this, then I won't believe yet. So to prove it, he should send me his bank routing information, bank account number and the ability to transfer several thousand dollars into my account as a test, which, of course, I'll send back immediately as assurance that he's told the truth???!!!
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