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Sunday, Jan 5, 2014 07:00 AM EST
Ronald Reagan and the occultist: The amazing story of the thinker behind his sunny optimism

The Gipper's warm "morning in America" worldview was directly shaped by his reading of occult thinker Manly P. Hall
Mitch Horowitz

Ronald Reagan often spoke of America’s divine purpose and of a mysterious plan behind the nation’s founding. “You can call it mysticism if you want to,” he told the Conservative Political Action Conference in 1974, “but I have always believed that there was some divine plan that placed this great continent between two oceans to be sought out by those who were possessed of an abiding love of freedom and a special kind of courage.” These were remarks to which Reagan often returned. He repeated them almost verbatim as president before a television audience of millions for the Statue of Liberty centenary on July 4, 1986.

When touching on such themes, Reagan echoed the work, and sometimes the phrasing, of occult scholar Manly P. Hall.

From the dawn of Hall’s career in the early 1920s until his death in 1990, the Los Angeles teacher wrote about America’s “secret destiny.” The United States, in Hall’s view, was a society that had been planned and founded by secret esoteric orders to spread enlightenment and liberty to the world.

In 1928, Hall attained underground fame when, at the remarkably young age of twenty-seven, he published “The Secret Teachings of All Ages,” a massive codex to the mystical and esoteric philosophies of antiquity. Exploring subjects from Native American mythology to Pythagorean mathematics to the geometry of ancient Egypt, this encyclopedia arcana remains the unparalleled guidebook to ancient symbols and esoteric thought. “The Secret Teachings” won the admiration of figures ranging from General John Pershing to Elvis Presley. Novelist Dan Brown cites it as a key source.

After publishing his “Great Book,” Hall spent the rest of his life lecturing and writing within the walls of his Egypto-art deco campus, the Philosophical Research Society, in L.A.’s Griffith Park neighborhood. Hall called the place a “mystery school” in the mold of Pythagoras’s ancient academy.

It was there in 1944 that the occult thinker produced a short work, one little known beyond his immediate circle. This book, “The Secret Destiny of America,” evidently caught the eye of Reagan, then a middling movie actor gravitating toward politics.

Hall’s concise volume described how America was the product of a “Great Plan” for religious liberty and self-governance, launched by a hidden order of ancient philosophers and secret societies. In one chapter, Hall described a rousing speech delivered by a mysterious “unknown speaker” before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The “strange man,” wrote Hall, invisibly entered and exited the locked doors of the statehouse in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776, delivering an oration that bolstered the wavering spirits of the delegates. “God has given America to be free!” commanded the mysterious speaker, urging the men to overcome their fears of being hanged or beheaded, and to seal destiny by signing the great document. Newly emboldened, the delegates rushed forward to add their names. They looked to thank the stranger only to discover that he had vanished from the locked room. Was this, Hall wondered, “one of the agents of the secret Order, guarding and directing the destiny of America?”

At a 1957 commencement address at his alma mater Eureka College, Reagan, then a corporate spokesman for General Electric, sought to inspire students with this leaf from occult history. “This is a land of destiny,” Reagan said, “and our forefathers found their way here by some Divine system of selective service gathered here to fulfill a mission to advance man a further step in his climb from the swamps.” Reagan then retold (without naming a source) the tale of Hall’s unknown speaker. “When they turned to thank the speaker for his timely words,” Reagan concluded, “he couldn’t be found and to this day no one knows who he was or how he entered or left the guarded room.” Reagan revived the story in 1981, when Parade magazine asked the president for a personal essay on what July 4 meant to him. Presidential aide Michael Deaver delivered the piece with a note saying, “This Fourth of July message is the president’s own words and written initially in the president’s hand,” on a yellow pad at Camp David. Reagan retold the legend of the unknown speaker—this time using language very close to Hall’s own: “When they turned to thank him for his timely oratory, he was not to be found, nor could any be found who knew who he was or how he had come in or gone out through the locked and guarded doors.”

Where did Hall uncover the tale that inspired a president? The episode originated as “The Speech of the Unknown” in a collection of folkloric stories about America’s founding, published in 1847 under the title “Washington and His Generals, or Legends of the Revolution” by American social reformer and muckraker George Lippard. Lippard, a friend of Edgar Allan Poe, had a strong taste for the gothic—he cloaked his mystery man in a “dark robe.” He also tacitly acknowledged inventing the story: “The name of the Orator . . . is not definitely known. In this speech, it is my wish to compress some portion of the fiery eloquence of the time.”

For his part, Hall seemed to know almost nothing about the story’s point of origin. He had been given a copy of the “Speech of the Unknown” by a since-deceased secretary of the occult Theosophical Society, but with no bibliographical information other than its being from a “rare old volume of early American political speeches.” The speech appeared in 1938 in the Society’s journal, The Theosophist, with the sole note that it was “published in a rare volume of addresses, and known probably to only one in a million, even of American citizens.”

There are indications that Reagan and Hall may have personally met to discuss the story. In an element unique to Hall’s version, the mystic-writer (dubiously) attributed the tale of the unknown speaker to the writings of Thomas Jefferson. When Reagan addressed the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington on January 25, 1974, he again told the story, but this time cited an attribution—of sorts. Reagan said the tale was told to him “some years ago” by “a writer, who happened to be an avid student of history. . . . I was told by this man that the story could be found in the writings of Jefferson. I confess, I never researched or made an effort to verify it.”

Whether the president and the occultist ever met, it is Hall’s language that unmistakably marks the Reagan telling.

Biographer Edmund Morris noted Reagan’s fondness for apocryphal tales and his “Dalíesque ability to bend reality to his own purposes.” Yet he added that the president’s stories “should be taken seriously because they represent core philosophy.” This influential (and sometimes inscrutable) president of the late twentieth century found an illustration of his core belief in America’s purpose within the pages of an occult work little known beyond its genre.

“Anything Is Possible”

During the 1980 president campaign, many Americans were electrified by Reagan’s depiction of America as a divinely ordained nation where anything could be willed into existence.

In announcing his candidacy in 1979, Reagan declared: “To me our country is a living, breathing presence, unimpressed by what others say is impossible. . . . If there is one thing we are sure of it is . . . that nothing is impossible, and that man is capable of improving his circumstances beyond what we are told is fact.” It was a vastly different kind of political oratory than the restrained, moralistic tones of his opponent, Jimmy Carter.

Through his reiteration of this theme of America’s destiny, and his powers as a communicator, Reagan shaped how Americans wanted to see themselves: as a portentous people possessed of the indomitable spirit to scale any height. This American self-perception could bitterly clash with reality in the face of a declining industrial base and falling middle-class wages. Nonetheless, the image that Reagan gave Americans of themselves—as a people always ushering in new dawns—formed the political template to which every president who followed him had to publicly adhere.

After Reagan, virtually every major campaign address included paeans to better tomorrows, from Bill Clinton’s invocation of “a place called Hope” (and his use of Fleetwood Mac’s “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow”), to Barack Obama’s “Yes, we can.” In his 2011 State of the Union address, Obama echoed one of Reagan’s signature lines when he declared: “This is a country where anything is possible.” The one recent president who complained that he couldn’t master “the vision thing,” George H. W. Bush, was not returned to office.

more at...

http://www.salon.com/2014/01/05/ronald_r...=pulsenews
Hall is worthy of fascination whether you agree with Freemasonic ideology/behaviour or not imo

He wrote the Secret Teachings of All Ages at 27... 27! I am working my way through it now, it is am amazing piece of work.

Cool bit about the 'unkown speaker'... likely a high Mason. I am learning more about how ORIGINALLY, America WAS created with good intentions, meant to be free etc... I have found many accords that say it wan a 'grand experiment' to see if under the right circumstances if humans COULD truly be free and self-governing.

- am still looking into how/why it went wrong, apparently corrupted by many of the same secret societies that set it up! Very interesting...

IMO, though Freemasons are guilty of so many horrendous acts, and the religiosity of their teachings can go to dangerous extremes, many of the concepts and symbolisms are a completely fascinating way of thinking about the world and one's self. The mystery schools held not only elitist power-hungry ideals, but also wonderful lessons in sciences, astronomy, geometry, self-understanding, self-improvement, and a whole lens from which to try to understand the wonder of human life itself. The schools of Pythagoras for examples may have declared ridiculous religious doctrines from his findings, but that doesn't make his findings/knowledge of geometry for example any less wonderful.

I have listened to many hours of Manly P Hall gladly, - it is good to know that Hall was not brought up in the Freemasons, but rather wrote his great work OUTSIDE of it, and as a result was granted an honorary 33rd degree because of his clear mastery of the subjects.

Fuck Reagan, though lol
Reagan was definitely into occult/mind control programs earlier in his career as well.

I believe he was known to work at the Lookout Mountain Laboratory during the 50's/60's.

Reagan always struck me as more of a CIA/Bush puppet than a leader.
reagan always consulted an astrologer.

yet all these PROTESTants always claim to be Christian.

hilarious.

george bush jr. another PROTESTant regularly engages in occult rituals at bohemian grove and the yale tomb.
Ronald did some of his best acting as president.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
(01-10-2014 12:13 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote: [ -> ]reagan always consulted an astrologer.

yet all these PROTESTants always claim to be Christian.

hilarious.

george bush jr. another PROTESTant regularly engages in occult rituals at bohemian grove and the yale tomb.

Yeah, these are not things Christians do...it's pretty plain and simple.

Most of them pose as Christians because you can't win elections by being honest and saying that you engage in occult traditions and ceremonies.

If people want to do that kind of stuff, that's their choice.

But the deceitful full way many of them win elections by falsely posing as 'Christians' is quite disturbing.
protestants are the innocent face of the occult.
(01-10-2014 12:40 AM)Masato Toys Wrote: [ -> ]Hall is worthy of fascination whether you agree with Freemasonic ideology/behaviour or not imo

He wrote the Secret Teachings of All Ages at 27... 27! I am working my way through it now, it is am amazing piece of work.

Cool bit about the 'unkown speaker'... likely a high Mason. I am learning more about how ORIGINALLY, America WAS created with good intentions, meant to be free etc... I have found many accords that say it wan a 'grand experiment' to see if under the right circumstances if humans COULD truly be free and self-governing.

- am still looking into how/why it went wrong, apparently corrupted by many of the same secret societies that set it up! Very interesting...

IMO, though Freemasons are guilty of so many horrendous acts, and the religiosity of their teachings can go to dangerous extremes, many of the concepts and symbolisms are a completely fascinating way of thinking about the world and one's self. The mystery schools held not only elitist power-hungry ideals, but also wonderful lessons in sciences, astronomy, geometry, self-understanding, self-improvement, and a whole lens from which to try to understand the wonder of human life itself. The schools of Pythagoras for examples may have declared ridiculous religious doctrines from his findings, but that doesn't make his findings/knowledge of geometry for example any less wonderful.

I have listened to many hours of Manly P Hall gladly, - it is good to know that Hall was not brought up in the Freemasons, but rather wrote his great work OUTSIDE of it, and as a result was granted an honorary 33rd degree because of his clear mastery of the subjects.

Fuck Reagan, though lol

ManP Hall is definitely worth a read for any CTer. I think redneck first turned me onto his stuff.

but there are some sinister type messages in there beyond all the flowery euphemistic language.
^^^ I don't think his message is sinister though, he's discussing sinister themes that come through in some of these Ancient belief systems.

As a Theosophist though, he no doubt shared many of the beliefs that he discussed. They have some weird ideas on the origin of humans. I don't see it as white supremacist like some people do however, but man started off as a mole like creature and was blind, and then eventually he evolved and could see the light. All very metaphorical.
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