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Is that the latest urban trend?
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/0...SF20120305

Tattooed women outnumber men in a new poll


By Piya Sinha-Roy
LOS ANGELES | Mon Mar 5, 2012 4:56pm EST
(Reuters) - Think tattoos are mostly for tough-looking men and only a few women? Think again. The fair sex is getting inked more often these days, according to a poll set for release on Tuesday.

The TV network behind new show "Best Ink" and Lightspeed Research asked just over 1000 people across the United States about their perceptions of body art, and it turned out 59 percent of women have tattoos compared to 41 percent of men.

But women get their ink in different shapes and sizes than men, and the act of putting a piece of art on their skin is often a shared experience. The number of tattooed celebrities and TV shows have increased cultural acceptance and spurred more people to not only get them, but display them openly.

"It's become more acceptable for people to ... step into the tattoo world," said Joe Capobianco, a tattoo artist with almost 20 years of experience and the head judge on the Oxygen network's upcoming program, "Best Ink."

But Capobianco adds this advice: "If you're going to do it, do it, but be smart about it, make an educated decision."

The Lightspeed survey found that 89 percent of those people who had tattoos said they did not care if people disproved of their body ink and 46 percent said they'd proudly show their tattoo to their bosses at work.

The poll revealed that 40 percent of women made the tattoo experience a shared one, often getting inked with friends and loved ones, They also took the experience "a little more seriously" than their male counterparts.

"Women have a tendency sometimes of getting that little souvenir keepsake tattoo with deeper meaning, whereas men tend to go a little overboard and fill themselves up with larger pieces," said Capobianco.

The tattoo artist also saw a growing trend toward traditional 'Americana' tattoos, such as 'Mom,' with simple colors and bold bright styles in a homage to the working classes of early 20th century.

Sabina Kelley, a tattooed fashion model and also a judge on "Best Ink," said the popularity of reality TV shows such as TLC's "LA Ink" and Spike TV's "Ink Master" has made the tattoo tradition more acceptable within the mainstream audience.

"It's becoming a little more acceptable, and looking at how popular the tattoo shows on TV have gotten, more of the mainstream want to be tattooed," she said.

Stars such as Angelina Jolie and David Beckham have led the way in displaying their body art in public, and younger celebrities have followed their lead, especially women.

Rihanna, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry and former Disney channel stars Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato, Ashley Tisdale and Vanessa Hudgens have posted their tattoos on Twitter, often getting inked with friends or relaying the meaning behind it.

"The younger crowd, especially girls, are getting more rebellious, doing it more for shock value," said Kelley, who has noticed more girls getting tattoos on necks and chests that are more visible and less easy to hide.


But Capobianco said there is one type of tattoo that, perhaps, may be better left untouched by human skin: a loved one's name. He calls it the "kiss of death" in a relationship.

"Names really are the big one I have to talk people out of, not a child's name ... but a loved one, because there are no guarantees in life," he said.

More results of the poll can be found at Oxygen.com on Tuesday. Oxygen's new series, "Best Ink" will premiere on March 27.

(Reporting By Piya Sinha-Roy)
More women in Singapore getting tattoos

By Sia Ling Xin | Singapore Showbiz – Mon, Jul 22, 2013 10:22 AM SGT
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Sophie Kok has a tattoo of a disintegrating dandelion and the silhouettes of birds. (Photo courtesy of Sophie …

More members of the fairer sex are walking into tattoo parlors in Singapore these days.

Yahoo! Singapore spoke to eight tattoo artists and they all reported an increase in the number of females getting inked.
Females made up about 10 to 20 per cent of the client base a decade ago, but now they make up as much as 50 per cent.

Full article: http://sg.entertainment.yahoo.com/blogs/...44343.html
http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive...os/274658/

The Colorful, Subversive History of Women Getting Tattoos

A recently reissued book traces how body art went from forbidden to trendy.

STEVEN HELLER

APR 4 2013, 11:15 AM ET

Tattooed ladies were once carnival freaks. Now they're cool hipster chicks. A recently published third edition of a book about body art, Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and the Tattoo by Margot Mifflin (powerHouse Books), traces that shift, documenting how tattoos' popularity has risen among women as the social implications of getting them have shifted. It's a good time for a tome like this: Mifflin told me that tattooing has changed tremendously in the couple of past decades, both aesthetically—improved color and more detailed, expansive imagery—and socially, to the point where it has "fully entered the middle class." She added that "as of last year, for the first time in American history, more women are tattooed than men."

Mifflin, who is not tattooed, is an Associate Professor at Lehman College/CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and came to tattooing as a cultural critic in the mid '90s after writing about feminist art and pop culture for publications like Elle and ARTnews: "I saw that tattooing was an amazing barometer of women's dreams and fears and passions at that time—a period when body issues were at a peak of controversy at the end of the culture wars—and it made me wonder what women's tattoos revealed about them going back to the 19th century when European and American women started getting inked."

Although much has already been written about tattooing, especially in the last decade, Mifflin notes that very little of what's in the popular press is critical or analytical: "I have always been and continue to be amazed at how little interest visually literate people have in tattooing, which is all around us." Only in the past couple of decades has what she calls a "chronic class bias in the visual arts" turned around somewhat. Now, "low" arts like graffiti are now themes for scholarship. Even so, while mass media is enthusiastic about tattoos, the art world still shows little interest in them, despite their links to popular fashion, folk art, graphic design, and fine art.

In the early 20th century, tattoos were stigmatized (even illegal in some jurisdictions) because of their association with raunchy male imagery. Middle-class women who were tattooed knew they would be considered "loose" or seedy if they showed their marks.

So Mifflin's thesis is rooted in subversion. She asserts that tattoos in Western culture have always been subversive for women, especially in the 19th century when they violated the assumption that "women should be pure, that their bodies should be concealed and controlled, and that ladies should not express their own desires, which is implicit in the very act of permanently marking the skin with imagery that reflects individual tastes." In the early 20th century, tattoos were stigmatized (even illegal in some jurisdictions) because of their association with raunchy male imagery. Middle-class women who were tattooed knew they would be considered "loose" or seedy if they showed their marks. By the '60s and '70s, tattooing became more directly linked to the counterculture, and remained so until the 2000s. Now tattoos are not as subversive or associated with "bad" women—instead, they have become fashion accessories of the most indelible kind.

Although "not all tattooed women were considered freaks—tattooed society women wore discreet decorative tattoos, which were trendy in the late 19th century, first in London, then in New York," heavily inked women were considered "a violation of nature." Something similar could be said for men, but women were decidedly less accepted because "they were more explicitly associated with nature through motherhood and female intuition and other feminine intangibles that disqualified them from having much influence in culture." The circus and carnival freak-show ladies were also guilty of transgression because they showed bare skin in public.

Mifflin refers in her book to Olive Oatman, "a tragically bicultural American" who was orphaned after her family was killed by Southwest Indians in the 1850s, then adopted and raised by Mohave Indians who gave her a chin tattoo as a mark of tribal acceptance. After she was ransomed back to the whites at age 19, she was stranded between the two cultures and the tattoo marked her as a Mohave and functioned as a kind of ethnic barrier. "It's somehow fitting," Mifflin said, "In light of our colonial past and our multicultural present, that the first American tattooed woman was a white Indian. She literally embodied the two cultures on which the country was founded."

The permanency of tattoos is the most confounding, and controversial, issue across genders. We all switch pictures on the wall from time to time or change our jewelry, but those who wear conspicuously outrageous tattoos are doing it for life. Mifflin said that although the people she has talked with seem to be content, "you do have to wonder if someone would tell you that they made a huge mistake they regret and will have to show publicly forever. I have only heard about regrets about mistakes that can be hidden."
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Only in the past couple of decades has what she calls a "chronic class bias in the visual arts" turned around somewhat. Now, "low" arts like graffiti are now themes for scholarship

Is this some kind of joke ?
No funnier than handing out scholarships to footballers and track athletes
Supermarket is now filled with hideous fifty year old fatwomen covered in tattoos trying to flirt with an unlucky geezer. Stop the world, I want to get off!



(08-07-2013 09:36 AM)DONGED BY JOHNSON Wrote: [ -> ]No funnier than handing out scholarships to footballers and track athletes

Athletes generate insane amounts of money for universities.
I told my girl, I will never let her get a tattoo. It's not classy.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk 4 Beta
(08-07-2013 09:58 AM)Gimp Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-07-2013 09:36 AM)DONGED BY JOHNSON Wrote: [ -> ]No funnier than handing out scholarships to footballers and track athletes

Athletes generate insane amounts of money for universities.

I'm pretty sure it's only the top sport schools. Most colleges lose money.
(08-07-2013 09:58 AM)Gimp Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-07-2013 09:36 AM)DONGED BY JOHNSON Wrote: [ -> ]No funnier than handing out scholarships to footballers and track athletes

Athletes generate insane amounts of money for universities.

They could still generate insane amounts of tax revenue by putting them straight into the professional leagues thus not clogging up the system with academic retards which in turn would mean more academic scholarships for the kids who earned them. Trust me it works for the rest of the developed world.
The Wanker is on point.
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