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Full Version: Monsanto's stock is tanking!
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Interesting development with Monsanto. I hope they tank completely and go belly up if enough peopke reject their Frankenseeds.

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Pity Monsanto, the genetically modified seed and agrichemical giant. Its share price has plunged 25 percent since the spring. Market prices for corn and soybeans are in the dumps, meaning Monsanto's main customers—farmers who specialize in those crops—have less money to spend on its pricey seeds and flagship herbicide (which recently got named a "probable carcinogen" by the World Health organization, spurring lawsuits).

Monsanto's CEO hinted that the company may be too invested in high-tech seeds, and underinvested in old-fashioned pesticides.
Monsanto's long, noisy attempt to buy up rival pesticide giant Syngenta crumbled into dust last month. And Wednesday, Monsanto reported quarterly revenues and profits that sharply underperformed Wall Street expectations. For good measure, it also sharply lowered its profit projections for the year ahead.

In response to these unhappy trends, the company announced it was slashing 2,600 jobs, 12 percent of its workforce, and spending $3 billion to buy back shares. Share buybacks are a form of financial (as opposed to genetic) engineering—they magically boost a company's earnings-per-share ratio (a metric closely watched by investors) simply by removing shares from the market. And buybacks divert money from things like R&D—or keeping a company's workforce whole—and into the pockets of shareholders.

In a conference call with investors (transcript), Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant put a positive spin on the company's prospects. "Our germplasm performance has never been better, our trait technology has continued to leap and our market position and pipeline remains strong," he declared. But later, he hit upon a theme that became obvious when Monsanto was stalking Syngenta: that Monsanto's leadership feels the company is too invested in high-tech seeds, and underinvested in old-fashioned pesticides. (The market for Syngenta owns the globe's leading position.)

In the call, Jeff Zekauskas, an analyst with JP MorganChase, asked Grant whether Monsanto was still interested in boosting its pesticide portfolio by buying a competitor. Grant's answer was essentially yes: "We still believe in the opportunity of integrated solutions," i.e., selling more pesticides along with seeds. He added:

We've got a 400 million acre seed technology footprint. We've seen time and time again that we can increase revenue and improve grower service by bringing chemistry up on that footprint.

Translation: Our patented seeds and traits are sown on 400 million acres worldwide (about four times the size of California), and if we could sell more pesticides (chemistry) to the people who farm those acres, we could make more money. Later, he noted:

We continue to see duplication in R&D in the sector. We continue to see the low effectiveness of R&D with some of our competitors and we continue to think that consolidation in this space is inevitable.

Translation: Research-and-development investments in the ag-biotech/agrichemical sector aren't paying off—not enough blockbuster new products—so the few companies remaining in the field (there are six) are going to start swallowing each other up.

Massive layoffs, share buybacks, dreams of buying up the pesticide portfolios of competitors—these aren't characteristics of a company confident in the long-term profitability of its core technology: the genetic modification of crops.

http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/...ne-layoffs
I told people it would be prudent to buy Monsanto long Put options maybe 1-2 years ago
What a shame.
Heard about this the other day. Good stuff. Horrible company. Honestly, too, if they actually behaved ethnically (not forcing their products on the world), they would likely be in a much better position, PR wise.

Customer service 101.
I hope im wrong, but i think theyre ok.
Theyre in this game for the long haul and they have implemented many long term investments that will see them come out on top.

GM and non GM cannot co-exist. So for every monsanto crop field that exists today as monsanto customers for life, soon all their neighbours will be also be (forced) monsanto clients for life once their crops are contaminated and cross polinated with the GM crops.

So as long as Monsanto remain philanthropic and out of the goodness of their heart and their sense of humanitarian duties keep giving tons of free seeds away to poverty striken farmers, regions,and countries, and can make governments such as Ireland accidently plant GM fields (whoops), then they're short term return will be very low, but long term, they should own it all.
You think this has anything to do with Russia banning GMO's?
prob not. more to do with some of their pesticides being marked as harmful + the people finally waking up to this evil company
Banned throughout Europe, Monsanto’s GM corn found growing in Ireland
Posted on August 17, 2010 by geobear7 | 23 Comments
• Government destroys its own field trials
• Pioneer Hi-Bred seeds contaminated by Monsanto’s NK603
• Call for investigation to determine extent of contamination

By GM-Free Ireland

DUBLIN and GENEVA — The Irish Government has been accidentally growing GM maize, despite its policy to ban field trials and commercial cultivation of GM crops in the Republic. [1] The blunder is doubly embarrassing because this GM maize is an illegal variety that is not allowed for cultivation anywhere in the European Union.

The discovery was made by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) at four of its own field trial sites including the National Crop Variety Testing Centre at Backweston in Co. Kildare, and at three other undisclosed locations in Counties Kildare, Kilkenny, and Cork.

DAFF carried out the field trials with a supposedly Non-GM maize variety PR39T83 supplied by Pioneer Hi-Bred Northern Europe, a subsidiary of DuPont, the world’s second biggest seed company and sixth biggest agrochemicals company. The purpose of the trials was to find out if this conventional maize is “suitable for cultivation and use under Irish farming conditions”.

According to a press release issued late yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) [2], routine tests by DAFF discovered that the Pioneer Hi-Bred maize is contaminated by Monsanto’s patented GM “event” NK603. The genetic modification forces the crop to survive heavy spraying with glyphosate, part of the cocktail of toxic chemicals contained in Monsanto’s controversial Roundup herbicide. [3]

Cultivation of this GM maize is illegal the EU, although importation is allowed for animal feed and human food. It is unclear when DAFF first discovered the contamination. The EPA says it was only notified on 3 June – three months after the same seeds were found to be contaminated in Germany, and long after they were sown in Ireland. DAFF re-confirmed the contamination on 19 July.

The EPA says that Pioneer provided a “certificate of analysis” claiming the maize was GM-free. But random tests by DAFF found that 3 out of every 1,000 plants were contaminated by the illegal GM maize variety. That’s about 300 illegal GM crops per hectare. DAFF says it destroyed its fields of contaminated maize plants before they reached the flowering stage, in order to prevent pollen drift that would further contaminate neighbouring conventional and organic farmers, whose crops would then also have to be destroyed.

This is the first time a GM crop has been grown – albeit accidentally – in Ireland since protestors destroyed field trials of Monsanto’s patented GM beets in 1998.

https://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2010/0...n-ireland/

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they should be seriously sued for contaminating non-GM fields like this. where is the justice?

you want to do your GM shit fine, but if that shit drifts you get fined up the a-hole.
Good, i wish people would sue them tobacco style

Sent from my SM-T310 using Tapatalk
(10-14-2015 12:13 PM)kanotoa Wrote: [ -> ]Good, i wish people would sue them tobacco style

Sent from my SM-T310 using Tapatalk

They are!
People are putting together a few class action suits against them because it was recently revealed that they knew all along that round up can cause cancer and they not only hid this from the public, but they marketed it as completly safe.

They've been sued plenty in the past for their other chemicals too; DDT, agent orange, aspartame. Probably what has helped their stock tank.

But in their bio tech side of things. They are the ones suing everyone, and ruthlessly so. They own those seed patents (as well as the courts and the FDA) and if your crops have their genes, monsanto owns you.
Monsanto actively seek out and conduct DNA tests on their clients neighbouring farms' crops the following season so they can sue them and force them into being monsanto clients, and so it snowballs.
they have won nearly every lawsuit they were engaged in IIRC
(10-12-2015 06:07 PM)EVILYOSHIDA Wrote: [ -> ]Banned throughout Europe, Monsanto’s GM corn found growing in Ireland
Posted on August 17, 2010 by geobear7 | 23 Comments
• Government destroys its own field trials
• Pioneer Hi-Bred seeds contaminated by Monsanto’s NK603
• Call for investigation to determine extent of contamination

By GM-Free Ireland

DUBLIN and GENEVA — The Irish Government has been accidentally growing GM maize, despite its policy to ban field trials and commercial cultivation of GM crops in the Republic. [1] The blunder is doubly embarrassing because this GM maize is an illegal variety that is not allowed for cultivation anywhere in the European Union.

The discovery was made by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) at four of its own field trial sites including the National Crop Variety Testing Centre at Backweston in Co. Kildare, and at three other undisclosed locations in Counties Kildare, Kilkenny, and Cork.

DAFF carried out the field trials with a supposedly Non-GM maize variety PR39T83 supplied by Pioneer Hi-Bred Northern Europe, a subsidiary of DuPont, the world’s second biggest seed company and sixth biggest agrochemicals company. The purpose of the trials was to find out if this conventional maize is “suitable for cultivation and use under Irish farming conditions”.

According to a press release issued late yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) [2], routine tests by DAFF discovered that the Pioneer Hi-Bred maize is contaminated by Monsanto’s patented GM “event” NK603. The genetic modification forces the crop to survive heavy spraying with glyphosate, part of the cocktail of toxic chemicals contained in Monsanto’s controversial Roundup herbicide. [3]

Cultivation of this GM maize is illegal the EU, although importation is allowed for animal feed and human food. It is unclear when DAFF first discovered the contamination. The EPA says it was only notified on 3 June – three months after the same seeds were found to be contaminated in Germany, and long after they were sown in Ireland. DAFF re-confirmed the contamination on 19 July.

The EPA says that Pioneer provided a “certificate of analysis” claiming the maize was GM-free. But random tests by DAFF found that 3 out of every 1,000 plants were contaminated by the illegal GM maize variety. That’s about 300 illegal GM crops per hectare. DAFF says it destroyed its fields of contaminated maize plants before they reached the flowering stage, in order to prevent pollen drift that would further contaminate neighbouring conventional and organic farmers, whose crops would then also have to be destroyed.

This is the first time a GM crop has been grown – albeit accidentally – in Ireland since protestors destroyed field trials of Monsanto’s patented GM beets in 1998.

https://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2010/0...n-ireland/

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they should be seriously sued for contaminating non-GM fields like this. where is the justice?

you want to do your GM shit fine, but if that shit drifts you get fined up the a-hole.

In Soviet America, Monsanto sues YOU when their posion infects your farm!
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